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Source of Funds Report

 

TYRONZA ELEMENTARY
412 MAIN ST.,TYRONZA, AR 72386

Source of Funds

For: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries, NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies, NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects, NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services.

Total Amount Reported: $178985

Generated on September 25, 2014


Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $9941
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $28827
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $99562
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $35402
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $5253
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $9941
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP math Priority:

    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 80 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 32% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 57% PROFICIENT, and 19% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, Female 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 19% Below Basic, 48% Basic, 33% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 17% Basic, 48% Proficient, 35% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: all multiple choice were above 50%. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, data analysis and probability. The data showed that the scores remained the same. According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 53 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 21% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 100% PROFICIENT, and 0% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 30% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 22% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 33% Proficient, 30% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 29% Proficient, 29% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 100% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 40% Proficient, 27% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 20% DECREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 49 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 30% scored BASIC, and 22% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 23% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 10% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 17% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 17% ADVANCED. Male 19% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 46% Proficient, 4% Advanced, Female 24% Below Basic, 29% Basic, 29% Proficient, 18% Advanced, African American 50% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 25% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 40% Proficient, 13% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 17% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 54% Below Basic, 38% Basic, 8% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 17% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, and data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations, measurement and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry, measurement and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 3% INCREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6th GRADE. Overall, 59 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 20% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 39% PROFICIENT, and 12% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 8% BASIC, 69% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Male 24% Below Basic, 19% Basic, 48% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 18% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 23% Below Basic, 16% Basic, 48% Proficient, 14% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 70% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 10% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 9% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 55% Proficient, 16% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 33% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: measurement. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: numbers and operations.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 10% scored BASIC, and10 % BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 47% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 60% ADVANCED. Male 70% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 90% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, 13% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% INCREASE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement, Geometry, and Data and Probablilty. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 65% compared to the state total of 71%, Data Analysis and Probability-61% compared to the state total of 73%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis in O/R, and numbers and operations in O/R, Measurement, Geometry, and Algebra. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 73% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 17% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 47% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A- ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 56% ADVANCED, 13% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Measurement, and Data and Probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, Geometry, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, measurement O/R, and Data Analysis and Probability O/R. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 46% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 28% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 33% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 7% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 9% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 64% PROFICIENT, and 9% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, 67% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 33% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 7% ADVANCED, 42% PROFICIENT, 23% BASIC, 28% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 15% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement, and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability, Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Data Analysis and Probability, and Geometry. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, and Measurement. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6TH GRADE. Overall, 64% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 10% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 12% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 28% PROFICIENT, and 32% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 66% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 25% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 42% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 20% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 5% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: N/A. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, algebra, and data analysis and probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on number and operations, and measurement. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    2012
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 25% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33 % BASIC, 25% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 17% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 29% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECLINE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement and Algebra. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 72% compared to the state total of 78%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis, probability, and numbers and operations in O/R.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 79% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 15% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 46% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 3% PROFICIENT, and 3% ADVANCED. Male 38% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 32% ADVANCED, 47% PROFICIENT, 11% BASIC, 11% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 4% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 61% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 23% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 36% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 30% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Male 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 26% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 18% ADVANACED, 36% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 27% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 28% ADVANCED, 40% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 15% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 16% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 9% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 11% BELOW BASIC, 27% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 68 % ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 50% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 25% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 43% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 10% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 3% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Data Analysis/Probability. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on data analysis/probability.
    2011
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 78% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 76%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Number and Operations and Data Analysis. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra and Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Measurement as well as open response questions focusing on algebra and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 4TH GRADE: Overall, 83% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 79%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 89% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, and Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 10% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, and Algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Geometry and Measurement in 4th grade.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 5th GRADE. Overall, 77% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75%, Non-economically disadvantaged 81%, Male 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 83% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 25% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations, and Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Measurement, Numbers and Operations, and Data and Probability.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 6th GRADE. Overall, 66% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 63%, Non-economically disadvantaged 79%, Male 56% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 34% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 65% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability and Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement, and Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Algebra and Geometry. In Open Response we will focus on Measurement and Numbers and Operations.
  2. 2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2011-2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
  3. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%. 2011/2012 was 94.96%, and 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
  4. 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st) - Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding, to taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in positions, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. 2. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. 3. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (addition). 4. Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. 5. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equals shares created smaller shares. 6. Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. 7. Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral. 8. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers who sum is less than or equal to 20, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown to represent the problem. 9. Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps. 10. Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used. Second Grade (2nd) are as follows: 1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Compare: Difference Unknown) 2. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions ( Compare: Bigger Unknown). 3. Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >,=, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. 4. Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write and equations to express and even number as a sum of two equal addends. b. write and equation. 5. Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds (addition). 6. Understand that the three digit number represents amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones. 7. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknown positions. 9. Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. 10. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Result Unknown). Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters (find perimeters). 2. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognizes area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts applying this technique to solve real world problems. 3. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the sides’ lengths, finding and unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas with the same area and different perimeters (compare area and perimeter). 4. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including (Addition and Subtraction). 5. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. 6. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. (Picture graph) 7Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs (bar graph). 8. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. 9. Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. A. represents a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line. 10. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). 6 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (perimeter). 2. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the rage 1-100 is a multiple of a given one digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime of composite (prime or composite). 3. Apply area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (Area). 4. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (find unknown angle). 5. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm, kg, g, lb, oz, ml, hr, min, sec; Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. 6. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (recognize angle measure as additive). 7. Multiply of divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. 8. Draw points, line, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in tow-dimensional figures. 9. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison e.g. Interpret 35=5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. (Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison). 10. Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison for additive comparison. (Compare-number of groups unknown). Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: 1. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consistent of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. 2. Apply and extent previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction of a whole number by a fraction. B. Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by tilting it with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles and represent fraction produces as rectangular areas. 3. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. B. a solid figure can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units. 4. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition an solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. A. find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as it would be found by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of the base. Represent threefold whole-number products as volumes, to represent the associative property of multiplication. 5. Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. 6. Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by: a. comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication. 7. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume. 8. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. C. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two non-overlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. 9. Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. 10. Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions. Sixth Grade (6th) are as follows: 1. Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. 2. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinates axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. A. Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line; recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself. 3. Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to expression quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought as the independent variables using graphs and tables, relate these to the equation. 4. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 5. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 6. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expression to produce the equivalent expression. 7. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. 8. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 9. Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values. 10. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents. A. write numerical expressions.
    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two- step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, compare: difference unknown, compare: bigger unknown, write and equation, understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amount of hundreds, tens, ones, compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits using >, =, and < symbols, add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations, add and subtract within 1000 using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares. Third Grade- Solve two-step word problems using the four operations, use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100, understand a fraction as a number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram, explain equivalence of fractions by reasoning their size, draw a scaled picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories, bar graphs, picture graphs, relate areas to operations of multiplication and addition, solve real world and mathematical problems finding perimeter, compare area and perimeter, partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Fourth Grade- Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplication comparison, compare- number of groups unknown, multiples, know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including: km, m, cm; kg, g, lb, oz, l, ml, hr, min, sec., Area, Perimeter, Recognize angle measure as additive, find unknown angles, draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines: identify these in two-dimensional figures. Fifth Grade- Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them-read, write, and compare decimal to thousandths, add and subtract fractions with like denominators, apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or a whole number by a fraction, interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), Apply and extend previous understandings of division and divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions, recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. Sixth Grade- Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write and equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, solve real- world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane, apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions, understand a rational number as a point on the number line (coordinate plane), understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values, write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents.
    11-12-THE LEARNING INSTITUTE: Analyzing data from 11-12 we found these areas that need improvement for the 12-13 school year: FIRST GRADE: Represent a whole number less than 15 in all possible ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 20 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 20 in various forms. Recognize the number or quality of sets up to 10 without counting, regardless of arrangement. Compare 2 numbers, with less than 12 in each set, using objects and pictures with and without appropriate technology. Count on and back using physical models or a number line starting at any whole number to fifty. Develop an understanding of the commutative property of addition using objects. Develop and understanding of the commutative property of addition. Apply number theory: odd or even. Apply number theory: use conventional symbols to represent the operations of addition and subtraction. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Develop strategies for basic addition. Solve addition problems by using a variety of methods. Solve subtraction problems by using a variety of methods and tools. Sort and classify objects by one or two attributes in more than one way. Identify and describe patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count. Recognize, extend, and create simple repeating patterns using a wide variety of materials and describe those using words. Interpret qualitative change. Compare three-dimensional solids. Compare and make geometric figures. Identify a line of symmetry. Replicate a simple two-dimensional figure from a briefly displayed example. Recognize that new figures can be created by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize the number of days in a week and the number of days in a month using a calendar. Orally sequence the months of a year. Recognize that an hour is longer than a minute and a minute is longer than a second. Recognize coins. Compare the value of coins. Distinguish between hot and cold temperatures on a thermometer. Recognize attributes of measurement and tools used to measure. Use a calendar to determine elapsed time. Tell time to the half-hour. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations. Determine the value of a small collection of coins. Show different combinations of coins. Select the appropriate non-standard measurement tools for length, capacity and mass. Estimate and measure the capacity, volume, length, width, weight, and mass of an object. Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs, Venn diagram, t chart. Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart. Describe probability of an event with more, less, or equally likely to occur. SECOND GRADE: Use efficient strategies to count a given set of objects in groups of 2s and 5s. Represent a whole number in multiple ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 100 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 100 in various forms. Determine relative position using ordinal numbers. Compare 2 numbers, less than 100 using numerals without appropriate technology. Model and use the commutative property for addition. Apply number theory. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Model, represent and explain division as sharing equally and represented subtraction in contextual situations. Develop strategies for basic addition facts. Demonstrate multiple strategies for adding two-digit whole numbers. Demonstrate computational fluency. State the value of a dollar. Demonstrate computational fluency. Use estimation strategies to solve addition problems and judge in reasonableness of the answer. Sort, classify, and label objects by 3 or more attributes in more than one way. Describe repeating patterns in the environment. Describe growing patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count forward and backward when given a number less than or equal to 100. Identify, describe and extend skip counting patterns from any given number. Identify a number that is more or less than any whole number less than 100 using multiples of ten. Compare the value of coins. Recognize, describe, extend, and create growing patterns using a wide variety of materials to solve problems. Select and/or write number sentences to find the unknown in problem-solving contexts involving two-digit addition and subtraction using appropriate labels. Interpret and compare quantitative change. Identify, classify and describe two-dimensional geometric figures. Use lines of symmetry to demonstrate and describe congruent figures within a two-dimensional figure. Create new figures by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize there are 12 months in a year and that each month has a specific number of days. Compare temperatures using the Fahrenheit scale. Tell time to the nearest 5 minute interval. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations in hour increments regardless of starting time. Demonstrate a given value of money up to $1.00 using a variety of coin combinations. Estimate and Measure length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools. Identify the purpose for data collection and collect, organize, record, and display the stat using physical materials. Make simple predications for a set of given data.
  5. TLI 5th Grade Science:
    Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: Compare the cell theory to the characteristics of a scientific theory. 2. Calculate mode from scientific data using SI units. 3. Identify the transfer of energy using pyramids; terrestrial and aquatic. 4. Identify characteristics of physical change. 5. Calculate range from scientific data using Si units. 6. Calculate median from scientific data using SI units. 7. Examine the role of limiting factors on the carrying capacity of an ecosystem: food, space, water, shelter. 8. Conduct investigations using: inclined planes-ramps. 9. Compare the human body’s mass to weight on Earth, the moon, and other planets in our solar system. 10. Explain the role of observation in the development of a theory.
Goal Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored a 59.09. We are a Needs Improvement school in Math. We will continue to strive to show growth in 2014-2015 school year, in order to make AMO of 83.12.
Intervention: Provide a standards based math program utilizing Common Core Math Curriculum.
Scientific Based Research: U.S. Department of Education, " What works Clearinghouse: EnVisionMATH" January, 2013.
PRWeb, "Reserach Study Shows Stunning Gains for Elemenrtary Student with Person's enVisionMATH Program" April, 2010.
An Action Based Research Study on How Using Manipulatives will Increase Students' Achievement in Mathematics. Published by Crystal Allen in 2007.
Standards, Assessments, and Accountability (2009) National Academy of Education.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
2 smartboards will be purchased to enhance our daily instruction. These smartboards will help reach the individual needs of every student.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Janice Baine and Tabitha Thacker Start: 07/01/2015
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $8,759.00

ACTION BUDGET: $8,759.00
Total Budget: $8,759.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance math instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: A Job-Embedded Professional Development: What It Is, Who is Responsible, and How to Get It Done Well, published by Andrew Croft, Jane G Coggshall, ph.D., Megan Dolan, Ed. D., Elizabeth Powers, Joellen Killion in 2010.
Michelle Larocque, Ira Kleiman, and Sharon M. Darling. (2011) "Parental Involvement: The Missing Link in School Achievement". 55(3), 115-122.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
11 ipads and 1 mac computer will be purchased to run the ipad mobile card. The mobile cart will help enhance instruction within the classroom. The mobile cart will hold 30 ipads and students will have one to one with the devices.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $1,182.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,182.00
Total Budget: $1,182.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $28827
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .9 GT .1 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $11,394.00

ACTION BUDGET: $11,394.00
(Jan Mullins)Paraprofessional will assist teachers in small groups in grades K-6. Providing interventions in response to literacy. 1120 FTE 1.00
Jan Mullins, paraprofessional, Doris Armstrong, paraprofessional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $3,009.00

ACTION BUDGET: $3,009.00
Frances Busby will be a child care provider for one child.
Jacinda Prince, Principal Start: 00/00/0000
End: 00/00/0000
  • Performance Assessments
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $4,638.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,638.00
Total Budget: $19,041.00
Intervention: Implementing Standards Based Instructional Practices
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Judy Meyer will be hired as an interventionist for grade k-6. She will help students to achieve common core standards. FTE 1.00 1591/62000
Action Type: Collaboration
Judy Meyer Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $4,800.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,800.00
Keiona Smith will tutor at risk students 30 minutes in the mornings.
Keiona Smith Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $159.00

ACTION BUDGET: $159.00
Total Budget: $4,959.00
Intervention: COMPUTER LAB
Scientific Based Research: "What Do Students Need to Know?", Willard R. Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc., published in Smart Start Summer Conference Program Materials Booklet, 1999 by the National School Conference Institute.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Computer lab manager will maintain Title I computer lab for grades K-6. 1120. FTE 1.00 Survey results are as follows: 153 students were asked if they were asked if they were comfortable using a computer, 153 said yes. 153 students were asked if they had internet at home, 20 replied with no and 133 replied yes. 153 students were asked if they were comfortable asking for help in computer lab, and 153 said yes.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doris Armstrong, computer para professional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Computers
  • District Staff
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $4,827.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,827.00
Total Budget: $4,827.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $99562
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .9 GT .1 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $44,231.00

ACTION BUDGET: $44,231.00
(Jan Mullins)Paraprofessional will assist teachers in small groups in grades K-6. Providing interventions in response to literacy. 1120 FTE 1.00
Jan Mullins, paraprofessional, Doris Armstrong, paraprofessional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,899.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,899.00
Frances Busby will be a child care provider for one child.
Jacinda Prince, Principal Start: 00/00/0000
End: 00/00/0000
  • Performance Assessments
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,024.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,024.00
Total Budget: $71,154.00
Intervention: Implementing Standards Based Instructional Practices
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Judy Meyer will be hired as an interventionist for grade k-6. She will help students to achieve common core standards. FTE 1.00 1591/62000
Action Type: Collaboration
Judy Meyer Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,774.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,774.00
Keiona Smith will tutor at risk students 30 minutes in the mornings.
Keiona Smith Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $735.00

ACTION BUDGET: $735.00
Total Budget: $14,509.00
Intervention: COMPUTER LAB
Scientific Based Research: "What Do Students Need to Know?", Willard R. Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc., published in Smart Start Summer Conference Program Materials Booklet, 1999 by the National School Conference Institute.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Computer lab manager will maintain Title I computer lab for grades K-6. 1120. FTE 1.00 Survey results are as follows: 153 students were asked if they were asked if they were comfortable using a computer, 153 said yes. 153 students were asked if they had internet at home, 20 replied with no and 133 replied yes. 153 students were asked if they were comfortable asking for help in computer lab, and 153 said yes.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doris Armstrong, computer para professional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Computers
  • District Staff
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,899.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,899.00
Total Budget: $13,899.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $35402
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .9 GT .1 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $1,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,000.00
Total Budget: $1,000.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance literacy instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Research on Progress Monitoring?" Brooks, D. Christopher. “Space Matters: The impact of Formal Learning Environments’ On student Learning. “ British Journal of Educational Technology 42.5 (2011): 719-726. ERIC. Web. 6 Sept. 2013.
Morris, Betty. (2002). “Overcoming Dyslexia.” Shaywitz, Sally E., ( 1996). “Dyslexia” Scientific American, (1996): November.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Tyronza Elementary will implement the Orton Gillingham Dyslexia program for all students. We will purchase raised alphabet letters, spellers, sand trays, glass beads, and glass slates. These items will be purchased for every student in grades K-2nd.
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $6,740.00

ACTION BUDGET: $6,740.00
Total Budget: $6,740.00
Intervention: COMPUTER LAB
Scientific Based Research: "What Do Students Need to Know?", Willard R. Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc., published in Smart Start Summer Conference Program Materials Booklet, 1999 by the National School Conference Institute.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Teachers will take students to the computer lab to work on common core research projects. There will be four research projects due per student each year. The research projects will be completed based on common core standards. Purchase of a computer lab printer.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
All classroom teachers Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $760.00

ACTION BUDGET: $760.00
32 computers will be purchased to update our 7 year old computer lab. These computers will help our students with research projects. These computers will also help enhance daily instruction.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $21,568.00

ACTION BUDGET: $21,568.00
Total Budget: $22,328.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP math Priority:

    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 80 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 32% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 57% PROFICIENT, and 19% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, Female 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 19% Below Basic, 48% Basic, 33% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 17% Basic, 48% Proficient, 35% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: all multiple choice were above 50%. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, data analysis and probability. The data showed that the scores remained the same. According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 53 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 21% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 100% PROFICIENT, and 0% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 30% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 22% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 33% Proficient, 30% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 29% Proficient, 29% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 100% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 40% Proficient, 27% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 20% DECREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 49 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 30% scored BASIC, and 22% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 23% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 10% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 17% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 17% ADVANCED. Male 19% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 46% Proficient, 4% Advanced, Female 24% Below Basic, 29% Basic, 29% Proficient, 18% Advanced, African American 50% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 25% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 40% Proficient, 13% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 17% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 54% Below Basic, 38% Basic, 8% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 17% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, and data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations, measurement and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry, measurement and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 3% INCREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6th GRADE. Overall, 59 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 20% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 39% PROFICIENT, and 12% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 8% BASIC, 69% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Male 24% Below Basic, 19% Basic, 48% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 18% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 23% Below Basic, 16% Basic, 48% Proficient, 14% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 70% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 10% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 9% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 55% Proficient, 16% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 33% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: measurement. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: numbers and operations.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 10% scored BASIC, and10 % BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 47% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 60% ADVANCED. Male 70% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 90% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, 13% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% INCREASE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement, Geometry, and Data and Probablilty. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 65% compared to the state total of 71%, Data Analysis and Probability-61% compared to the state total of 73%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis in O/R, and numbers and operations in O/R, Measurement, Geometry, and Algebra. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 73% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 17% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 47% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A- ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 56% ADVANCED, 13% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Measurement, and Data and Probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, Geometry, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, measurement O/R, and Data Analysis and Probability O/R. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 46% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 28% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 33% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 7% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 9% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 64% PROFICIENT, and 9% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, 67% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 33% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 7% ADVANCED, 42% PROFICIENT, 23% BASIC, 28% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 15% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement, and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability, Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Data Analysis and Probability, and Geometry. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, and Measurement. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6TH GRADE. Overall, 64% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 10% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 12% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 28% PROFICIENT, and 32% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 66% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 25% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 42% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 20% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 5% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: N/A. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, algebra, and data analysis and probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on number and operations, and measurement. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    2012
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 25% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33 % BASIC, 25% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 17% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 29% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECLINE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement and Algebra. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 72% compared to the state total of 78%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis, probability, and numbers and operations in O/R.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 79% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 15% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 46% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 3% PROFICIENT, and 3% ADVANCED. Male 38% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 32% ADVANCED, 47% PROFICIENT, 11% BASIC, 11% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 4% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 61% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 23% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 36% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 30% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Male 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 26% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 18% ADVANACED, 36% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 27% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 28% ADVANCED, 40% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 15% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 16% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 9% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 11% BELOW BASIC, 27% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 68 % ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 50% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 25% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 43% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 10% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 3% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Data Analysis/Probability. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on data analysis/probability.
    2011
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 78% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 76%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Number and Operations and Data Analysis. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra and Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Measurement as well as open response questions focusing on algebra and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 4TH GRADE: Overall, 83% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 79%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 89% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, and Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 10% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, and Algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Geometry and Measurement in 4th grade.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 5th GRADE. Overall, 77% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75%, Non-economically disadvantaged 81%, Male 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 83% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 25% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations, and Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Measurement, Numbers and Operations, and Data and Probability.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 6th GRADE. Overall, 66% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 63%, Non-economically disadvantaged 79%, Male 56% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 34% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 65% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability and Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement, and Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Algebra and Geometry. In Open Response we will focus on Measurement and Numbers and Operations.
  2. 2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2011-2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
  3. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%. 2011/2012 was 94.96%, and 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
  4. 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st) - Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding, to taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in positions, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. 2. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. 3. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (addition). 4. Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. 5. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equals shares created smaller shares. 6. Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. 7. Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral. 8. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers who sum is less than or equal to 20, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown to represent the problem. 9. Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps. 10. Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used. Second Grade (2nd) are as follows: 1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Compare: Difference Unknown) 2. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions ( Compare: Bigger Unknown). 3. Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >,=, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. 4. Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write and equations to express and even number as a sum of two equal addends. b. write and equation. 5. Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds (addition). 6. Understand that the three digit number represents amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones. 7. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknown positions. 9. Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. 10. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Result Unknown). Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters (find perimeters). 2. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognizes area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts applying this technique to solve real world problems. 3. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the sides’ lengths, finding and unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas with the same area and different perimeters (compare area and perimeter). 4. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including (Addition and Subtraction). 5. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. 6. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. (Picture graph) 7Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs (bar graph). 8. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. 9. Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. A. represents a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line. 10. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). 6 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (perimeter). 2. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the rage 1-100 is a multiple of a given one digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime of composite (prime or composite). 3. Apply area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (Area). 4. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (find unknown angle). 5. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm, kg, g, lb, oz, ml, hr, min, sec; Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. 6. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (recognize angle measure as additive). 7. Multiply of divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. 8. Draw points, line, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in tow-dimensional figures. 9. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison e.g. Interpret 35=5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. (Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison). 10. Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison for additive comparison. (Compare-number of groups unknown). Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: 1. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consistent of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. 2. Apply and extent previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction of a whole number by a fraction. B. Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by tilting it with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles and represent fraction produces as rectangular areas. 3. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. B. a solid figure can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units. 4. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition an solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. A. find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as it would be found by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of the base. Represent threefold whole-number products as volumes, to represent the associative property of multiplication. 5. Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. 6. Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by: a. comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication. 7. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume. 8. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. C. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two non-overlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. 9. Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. 10. Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions. Sixth Grade (6th) are as follows: 1. Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. 2. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinates axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. A. Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line; recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself. 3. Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to expression quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought as the independent variables using graphs and tables, relate these to the equation. 4. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 5. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 6. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expression to produce the equivalent expression. 7. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. 8. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 9. Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values. 10. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents. A. write numerical expressions.
    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two- step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, compare: difference unknown, compare: bigger unknown, write and equation, understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amount of hundreds, tens, ones, compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits using >, =, and < symbols, add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations, add and subtract within 1000 using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares. Third Grade- Solve two-step word problems using the four operations, use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100, understand a fraction as a number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram, explain equivalence of fractions by reasoning their size, draw a scaled picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories, bar graphs, picture graphs, relate areas to operations of multiplication and addition, solve real world and mathematical problems finding perimeter, compare area and perimeter, partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Fourth Grade- Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplication comparison, compare- number of groups unknown, multiples, know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including: km, m, cm; kg, g, lb, oz, l, ml, hr, min, sec., Area, Perimeter, Recognize angle measure as additive, find unknown angles, draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines: identify these in two-dimensional figures. Fifth Grade- Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them-read, write, and compare decimal to thousandths, add and subtract fractions with like denominators, apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or a whole number by a fraction, interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), Apply and extend previous understandings of division and divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions, recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. Sixth Grade- Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write and equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, solve real- world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane, apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions, understand a rational number as a point on the number line (coordinate plane), understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values, write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents.
    11-12-THE LEARNING INSTITUTE: Analyzing data from 11-12 we found these areas that need improvement for the 12-13 school year: FIRST GRADE: Represent a whole number less than 15 in all possible ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 20 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 20 in various forms. Recognize the number or quality of sets up to 10 without counting, regardless of arrangement. Compare 2 numbers, with less than 12 in each set, using objects and pictures with and without appropriate technology. Count on and back using physical models or a number line starting at any whole number to fifty. Develop an understanding of the commutative property of addition using objects. Develop and understanding of the commutative property of addition. Apply number theory: odd or even. Apply number theory: use conventional symbols to represent the operations of addition and subtraction. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Develop strategies for basic addition. Solve addition problems by using a variety of methods. Solve subtraction problems by using a variety of methods and tools. Sort and classify objects by one or two attributes in more than one way. Identify and describe patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count. Recognize, extend, and create simple repeating patterns using a wide variety of materials and describe those using words. Interpret qualitative change. Compare three-dimensional solids. Compare and make geometric figures. Identify a line of symmetry. Replicate a simple two-dimensional figure from a briefly displayed example. Recognize that new figures can be created by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize the number of days in a week and the number of days in a month using a calendar. Orally sequence the months of a year. Recognize that an hour is longer than a minute and a minute is longer than a second. Recognize coins. Compare the value of coins. Distinguish between hot and cold temperatures on a thermometer. Recognize attributes of measurement and tools used to measure. Use a calendar to determine elapsed time. Tell time to the half-hour. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations. Determine the value of a small collection of coins. Show different combinations of coins. Select the appropriate non-standard measurement tools for length, capacity and mass. Estimate and measure the capacity, volume, length, width, weight, and mass of an object. Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs, Venn diagram, t chart. Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart. Describe probability of an event with more, less, or equally likely to occur. SECOND GRADE: Use efficient strategies to count a given set of objects in groups of 2s and 5s. Represent a whole number in multiple ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 100 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 100 in various forms. Determine relative position using ordinal numbers. Compare 2 numbers, less than 100 using numerals without appropriate technology. Model and use the commutative property for addition. Apply number theory. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Model, represent and explain division as sharing equally and represented subtraction in contextual situations. Develop strategies for basic addition facts. Demonstrate multiple strategies for adding two-digit whole numbers. Demonstrate computational fluency. State the value of a dollar. Demonstrate computational fluency. Use estimation strategies to solve addition problems and judge in reasonableness of the answer. Sort, classify, and label objects by 3 or more attributes in more than one way. Describe repeating patterns in the environment. Describe growing patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count forward and backward when given a number less than or equal to 100. Identify, describe and extend skip counting patterns from any given number. Identify a number that is more or less than any whole number less than 100 using multiples of ten. Compare the value of coins. Recognize, describe, extend, and create growing patterns using a wide variety of materials to solve problems. Select and/or write number sentences to find the unknown in problem-solving contexts involving two-digit addition and subtraction using appropriate labels. Interpret and compare quantitative change. Identify, classify and describe two-dimensional geometric figures. Use lines of symmetry to demonstrate and describe congruent figures within a two-dimensional figure. Create new figures by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize there are 12 months in a year and that each month has a specific number of days. Compare temperatures using the Fahrenheit scale. Tell time to the nearest 5 minute interval. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations in hour increments regardless of starting time. Demonstrate a given value of money up to $1.00 using a variety of coin combinations. Estimate and Measure length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools. Identify the purpose for data collection and collect, organize, record, and display the stat using physical materials. Make simple predications for a set of given data.
  5. TLI 5th Grade Science:
    Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: Compare the cell theory to the characteristics of a scientific theory. 2. Calculate mode from scientific data using SI units. 3. Identify the transfer of energy using pyramids; terrestrial and aquatic. 4. Identify characteristics of physical change. 5. Calculate range from scientific data using Si units. 6. Calculate median from scientific data using SI units. 7. Examine the role of limiting factors on the carrying capacity of an ecosystem: food, space, water, shelter. 8. Conduct investigations using: inclined planes-ramps. 9. Compare the human body’s mass to weight on Earth, the moon, and other planets in our solar system. 10. Explain the role of observation in the development of a theory.
Goal Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored a 59.09. We are a Needs Improvement school in Math. We will continue to strive to show growth in 2014-2015 school year, in order to make AMO of 83.12.
Intervention: Strategies to enhance math instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: A Job-Embedded Professional Development: What It Is, Who is Responsible, and How to Get It Done Well, published by Andrew Croft, Jane G Coggshall, ph.D., Megan Dolan, Ed. D., Elizabeth Powers, Joellen Killion in 2010.
Michelle Larocque, Ira Kleiman, and Sharon M. Darling. (2011) "Parental Involvement: The Missing Link in School Achievement". 55(3), 115-122.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
11 ipads and 1 mac computer will be purchased to run the ipad mobile card. The mobile cart will help enhance instruction within the classroom. The mobile cart will hold 30 ipads and students will have one to one with the devices.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $5,334.00

ACTION BUDGET: $5,334.00
Total Budget: $5,334.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $5253
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .9 GT .1 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,000.00
Total Budget: $2,000.00
Intervention: Implementing Standards Based Instructional Practices
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Tyronza librarian will help implement reading strategies to enhance student achievement. Follett software will provide technical support for library.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Carey Smith, media specialist Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $1,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,000.00
Total Budget: $1,000.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance literacy instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Research on Progress Monitoring?" Brooks, D. Christopher. “Space Matters: The impact of Formal Learning Environments’ On student Learning. “ British Journal of Educational Technology 42.5 (2011): 719-726. ERIC. Web. 6 Sept. 2013.
Morris, Betty. (2002). “Overcoming Dyslexia.” Shaywitz, Sally E., ( 1996). “Dyslexia” Scientific American, (1996): November.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Teachers will use Test preparation materials and DIBELS assessments.
Action Type: Equity
Action Type: Special Education
Jacinda Prince, Principal Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,253.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,253.00
Total Budget: $2,253.00