District Menu Page | Work On Your ACSIP | Reports | Federal/State Budgets | School Completion Status | FAQ | Feedback | Logout
Source of Funds Report

 

EAST POINSETT CO. SCHOOL DIST.
502 McClellan Ave Lepanto AR 72354

Source of Funds Report

For: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries, NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies, NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects, NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services.

Total Amount Reported: $552570.2

Generated on September 25, 2014



EAST POINSETT CO. HIGH SCHOOL -- $204777
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $14910
    Priority 2: Achieving School in Math
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $16689
    Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $72883
    Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $41927
    Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
    Priority 2: Achieving School in Math
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $266
    Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $58102
    Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
        Goal: For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
EAST POINSETT CO. SCHOOL DIST. -- $50521.2
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $16073.4
    Priority 4: Wellness
        Goal: Students participating in the BMI activity will show physical improvements and be more educated in health and safety issues.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $34447.8
    Priority 1: Administrative
        Goal: The administration of East Poinsett County continues to verify its compliance with the laws governing education in the state of Arkansas and requirements governing allocation of federal funds to ensure that a quality, equitable education is provided to all students in a functional, safe environment.
    Priority 5: School Improvement
        Goal: The administration - along with parents and staff - will develop a district improvement plan to address various facets of instruction and learning during the 2014-2015 school year to enhance district-wide achievement. The district will focus on teaching, training, and instructing students to be mature, productive, and well-rounded adults.
LEPANTO ELEMENTARY -- $125720
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $9941
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to utilize our data, interventions, and tutoring to improve and motivate our students in their weakest areas, while striving to meet the rigor of PARCC and Common Core State Standards.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $14724
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $59605
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $36302
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to utilize our data, interventions, and tutoring to improve and motivate our students in their weakest areas, while striving to meet the rigor of PARCC and Common Core State Standards.
        Goal: All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $5148
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to utilize our data, interventions, and tutoring to improve and motivate our students in their weakest areas, while striving to meet the rigor of PARCC and Common Core State Standards.
        Goal: All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
TYRONZA ELEMENTARY -- $171552
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $9941
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $26309
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $94647
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $35402
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
    Priority 2: Math
        Goal: Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $0
    There is no data for the Source of Funds type "NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects".
Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $5253
    Priority 1: Literacy
        Goal: To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.

EAST POINSETT CO. HIGH SCHOOL -- $204777

Source of Funds

For: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries, NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies, NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects, NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services.


Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $14910
Priority 2: Achieving School in Math
Supporting Data:
  1. The 2013/2014 7th Grade Benchmark Exam: The scores for the 7th Grade Benchmark exam showed an overall proficiency rate of 46% and an advance rate of 22%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 47% Proficient and 21% Advanced. The weaknesses for students on this exam were Measurement for the multiple choice questions and the open response question. Strengths were in Numbers and Operations on multiple choice and Geometry Open Responses. The 2012/2013 7th Grade Benchmark Exam: The scores for the 7th Grade Benchmark exam showed an overall proficiency rate of 31% and an advance rate of 35%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 33% Proficient and 30% Advanced. The weaknesses for students on this exam were Measurement for the multiple choice questions and numbers and operations for the open response questions. Strengths were in Numbers and operations and Data Analysis and Probability in multiple choice. The 2011/2012 7th Grade Benchmark Exam: The scores for the 7th Grade Benchmark exam reflected an overall proficiency rate of 54% and an advance rate of 27%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 49% Proficient and 16% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 58% Proficient and 27% Advanced. The weaknesses for students on this exam were Measurement for the multiple choice questions and numbers and operations for the open response questions. Strengths were in Numbers and operations in multiple choice and Measurement in open response questions, in which students scored higher than the state averages.
  2. The 2013/2014 8th Grade Benchmark Exam. The scores for the 8th Grade Benchmark exam reflected an overall proficiency rate of 41% and an advance rate of 22%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 41% Proficient and 20% Advanced. The weaknesses for the 8th grade were the Geometry Multiple Choice questions and Open Response Questions. The strengths were Numbers and Operations multiple choice questions and Data Analysis and Probability open responses. The 2012/2013 8th Grade Benchmark Exam. The scores for this exam showed 43% Proficient and 15% Advanced. Our data showed that our strengths are in multiple choice numbers and operations, Algebra multiple choice, and data analysis and probability open responses. We identified our weaknesses as open response measurements and algebra open responses. The 2011/2012 8th Grade Benchmark Exam. The scores for the 8th Grade Benchmark exam reflected an overall proficiency rate of 45% and an advance rate of 14%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 43% Proficient and 11% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 47% Proficient and 14% Advanced. The weaknesses for the 8th grade were the Data Analysis and Probability open responses and the Data Analysis and Probability and Measurement multiple choice questions. The strengths were Numbers and Operations multiple choice questions and the Geometry open responses.
  3. EOC-Algebra Exam Benchmark 2013-2014 Exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 32% and an Advance rate of 23%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 29% Proficient and 18% Advanced. The weaknesses for this test were Linear Functions on Multiple Choice and Non-Linear Functions on Open Responses. The strengths were Language of Algebra on Multiple Choice and solving Equations and inequalities on Open Responses. END OF COURSE ALGEBRA EXAM 2012-2013: This exam showed an overall Proficiency rating of 60% and Advanced rating of 28%. This is an increase over last year’s scores. The strengths for this exam were the Language of Algebra and Linear Functions and the weakness was Solving Equations. EOC-Algebra Exam Benchmark 2011-2012 exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 51% and an Advance rate of 30%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 54% Proficient and 31% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 59% Proficient and 35% Advanced. The weaknesses for this test were Solving Equations and Linear Functions. The strengths were Language of Algebra and probability.
  4. 2013-2014 EOC-Geometry Benchmark Exam. The scores for the Geometry EOC exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 61% and an Advance rate of 8%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 58% Proficient and 9% Advanced. The weaknesses for this assessment were Triangle Multiple Choice and Triangle on Open Response. The strengths were Language of Geometry on Multiple Choice and Measurements on Open Response. 2012-2013 End-of-Course Geometry Benchmark Exam: The scores for this exam reflected an overall Proficiency Rate of 53% and Advanced Rate of 14%. The weaknesses for this assessment was relationships between 2 and 3 dimensions and measurement. The strengths was Language of Geometry. 2011-2012 EOC-Geometry Benchmark Exam The scores for the Geometry EOC exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 31% and an Advance rate of 25%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 33% Proficient and 20% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 30% Proficient and 30% Advanced. The weaknesses for this assessment were Coordinate Geometry and Transformations. The strengths were Language of Geometry.
  5. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT EPC 2014 average ACT Math score was 17.7 EPC 2013 average ACT Math score was 16.6 EPC 2012 average ACT Math score was 18.2
Goal For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: Teachers will work on improving basic skills necessary to ensure student success in math and science classes.
Scientific Based Research: Peterson, Shelley Stagg. "Teaching Content With The Help Of Writing Across The Curriculum." Middle School Journal 39.2 (2007): 26-33. ERIC. Web. 11 Sept. 2013.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Teachers will use math concepts and/or open ended questions, evaluate progress, and adjust instructions. Students will utilize technology in order to apply learning of math concepts in multiple content areas. 3 SMARTboards (1 enhanced Smartboard) will be purchased for Business Applications Career Class and Music Art Classes.
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
Math Teachers, Angie Rogers Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $14,910.00

ACTION BUDGET: $14,910.00
Total Budget: $14,910.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $16689
Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. BENCHMARK EXAM 2013/2014 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 47% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 90% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 76% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were in Reading Practical Passages 84% proficent compared to the state’s 82% and Writing across the board is higher than the state. Weaknesses for this test were in the Reading of Literary Passages and Writing: Style Domain; however, we were just a few points from the state averages for both of these areas. BENCHMARK EXAM 2012/2013- 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 40% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 89% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 66% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were Writing Usage and Mechanics and our weaknesses were in Literary Open Responses. BENCHMARK EXAM 2011/2012- 7TH Grade Literacy Exam The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy exam for this exam were 40% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We noticed a decline in our discrepancy between the male and female population with females scoring 77% Proficient and Advanced and males scoring 53% Proficient and Advanced. Strengths for students were in Writing Usage and Mechanics while areas of low performance were in Content Reading passages.
  2. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013/2014 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 78% with 51% of students scoring Proficient and 27% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap decrease between our male and female population with 81% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 75% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in all aspects of Writing, where we scored above state average in all areas. Another strength was in Reading Literary Passages where we scored 6.2 versus the state’s 6.0. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Mulitple Choice questions and Reading Practical Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012/2013 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 60% with 30% of students scoring Proficient and 30% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap increase between our male and female population with 75% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 50% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Reading Multiple Choice on the Content Passage and Open Responses on Literary Passages. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Content and Style and Reading Practical Passages and Content Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011/2012 The 2011-2012 Exam showed that 59% of students were proficient and 18% of students were advanced. We saw a decline in the gap between the male to female proficiency levels with females scoring 65% proficient or advanced and males scoring 54% proficient or advanced. For the eighth grade test students showed strength in reading practical passages and a weakness in reading literary passages. In writing there was strength in sentence formation and a weakness in content and style.
  3. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013-2014 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 48% of students scored Proficient and 18% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 24% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 83% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 50% Proficient and Advanced. We did see a decline in our African American population with 20% scoring Proficient and Advanced; compared to our Caucasian students who scored 70% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content, Mechanics, and Style and Reading Content Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage, Writing Mulitple Choice, and Reading Literary Passages. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012-2013 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 54% of students scored Proficient and 15% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 81% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 62% Proficient and Advanced. We did see gains in our African American population with 33% scoring Proficient and Advanced; however, there is still a gap compared to our Caucasian students who scored 81% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content and Style and Reading Literary and Practical Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Sentence Formation. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011-2012 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 50% of the East Poinsett County Juniors were proficient and 11% were advanced. This compares to the 49% proficiency at the state level and 19% advanced. There is a gap in proficiency between males and females with females scoring 73% proficient and advanced and males scoring 52% proficient and advanced; however, we did see a decrease in this discrepancy . We also identified a gap in achievement between the African Americans and the Caucasians. The African Americans had a proficiency rate of 25% while the Caucasians had 71% proficiency. The weakest area for the EPC Juniors was open responses for content reading passages and practical reading. The strength was in writing mechanics, usage, and sentence formation.
  4. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT: EPC 2014 average ACT English score was 18.0 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.1. The average composite score was 18.1. EPC 2013 average ACT English score was 16.5 and the average ACT Reading score was 17.2. The average composite score was 16.7. EPC 2012 average ACT English score was 18.3 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.2. The average composite score was 18.3.
  5. 2013 School Graduation Rate is 88.57, which met our AMO of 81.82% graduated. We are achieving in this area, but we will continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2012-2013 This data recording period shows a graduation rate of 71.43. This is below our AMO which requires us to be at 79.80% graduated. We also are below on our three year data period in which we are at 74.86% graduated, which is below our AMO goal of 79.80%. This remains as a weakness and we continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2011-2012 School year shows a graduation rate of 76.92%. This is below our AMO which requires us to be 79.78% graduated. We have identified this as a weakness and strive to increase our graduation rate.
Goal For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year at the high school, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth. For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: Implement the use of technology to improve literacy scores and enhance student learning.
Scientific Based Research: Enriquez, Amelito G. "Enhancing Student Performance Using Tablet Computers." College Teaching 58.3 (2010): 77-84. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Maintain Instructional Assistant for Plato Lab and ALE for students in the Junior and Senior High building . FTE 1.0 1140/61000-62000
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Teri Boon, Instructional Assistant, Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $3,009.00

ACTION BUDGET: $3,009.00
Maintain Remediation Coach for Senior High Building to assist in Plato Program. In order to increase our Graduation Rate and decrease the number of students repeating courses, we will offer course recovery during the summer months. Remediation Coach will be paid for summer services. FTE 1.0 1140/61000/62000
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
Arnessa Joplin-Remediaton Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $2,820.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,820.00
Distance Learning para-pro hired with NSLA funds to run and assist with distant learning classes. Journalism,Spanish I and II, and Calculus are offered.FTE:1.00 1120/61000/62000
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Tammy Turner,Para-pro Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $2,928.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,928.00
Total Budget: $8,757.00
Intervention: Implement programs that raise ACT test scores for all students taking ACT tests.
Scientific Based Research: Higgins, Betty, Melinda Miller, and Susan Wegmann. "Teaching To The Test...Not! Balancing Best Practice And Testing Requirements In Writing." Reading Teacher 60.4 (2006): 310-319. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
ACT classes in English, Reading, Math, and Science Reasoning are offered during the summer. Refresher classes are offered during school year before test dates. Purchase of 7 ACT tests for participating students and stipends for three teachers.1140/61000/62000/68000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doug Skipper-Teacher, Jennifer Fithen-Teacher, Melody Couch-Teacher Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $975.00

ACTION BUDGET: $975.00
Total Budget: $975.00
Intervention: New teaching strategies will be implemented to enhance instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Williams, Debra L. "Which Literacy Interventions Work For Adolescents That Continue To Struggle With Reading In High School And How Will They Be Provided?." Online Submission (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Due to high student absenteeism in the high school, the Interventionist will phone parents daily, counseling and encouraging them to see that their child attends school regularly. He will conduct weekly meetings with students who are at risk of not achieving, will meet and counsel at risk students in an attempt to identify whether their low performance is due to poor attendance, low skill level, or both. After identification has been made, he will work with the principal,teachers, and instructional coaches to provide interventions to improve student achievement. He will set up meetings with students and parents to discuss the importance of an education. He will oversee daily faculty advisory period, by distributing curriculum plans weekly. EVALUATION a call log will be maintained and daily attendance recorded for data effectiveness for the 2013-2014 school year. FTE.4914 1140
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Program Evaluation
Action Type: Special Education
John Kelly, Brian Weathers Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $6,957.00

ACTION BUDGET: $6,957.00
Total Budget: $6,957.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $72883
Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. BENCHMARK EXAM 2013/2014 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 47% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 90% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 76% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were in Reading Practical Passages 84% proficent compared to the state’s 82% and Writing across the board is higher than the state. Weaknesses for this test were in the Reading of Literary Passages and Writing: Style Domain; however, we were just a few points from the state averages for both of these areas. BENCHMARK EXAM 2012/2013- 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 40% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 89% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 66% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were Writing Usage and Mechanics and our weaknesses were in Literary Open Responses. BENCHMARK EXAM 2011/2012- 7TH Grade Literacy Exam The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy exam for this exam were 40% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We noticed a decline in our discrepancy between the male and female population with females scoring 77% Proficient and Advanced and males scoring 53% Proficient and Advanced. Strengths for students were in Writing Usage and Mechanics while areas of low performance were in Content Reading passages.
  2. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013/2014 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 78% with 51% of students scoring Proficient and 27% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap decrease between our male and female population with 81% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 75% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in all aspects of Writing, where we scored above state average in all areas. Another strength was in Reading Literary Passages where we scored 6.2 versus the state’s 6.0. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Mulitple Choice questions and Reading Practical Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012/2013 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 60% with 30% of students scoring Proficient and 30% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap increase between our male and female population with 75% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 50% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Reading Multiple Choice on the Content Passage and Open Responses on Literary Passages. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Content and Style and Reading Practical Passages and Content Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011/2012 The 2011-2012 Exam showed that 59% of students were proficient and 18% of students were advanced. We saw a decline in the gap between the male to female proficiency levels with females scoring 65% proficient or advanced and males scoring 54% proficient or advanced. For the eighth grade test students showed strength in reading practical passages and a weakness in reading literary passages. In writing there was strength in sentence formation and a weakness in content and style.
  3. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013-2014 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 48% of students scored Proficient and 18% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 24% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 83% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 50% Proficient and Advanced. We did see a decline in our African American population with 20% scoring Proficient and Advanced; compared to our Caucasian students who scored 70% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content, Mechanics, and Style and Reading Content Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage, Writing Mulitple Choice, and Reading Literary Passages. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012-2013 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 54% of students scored Proficient and 15% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 81% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 62% Proficient and Advanced. We did see gains in our African American population with 33% scoring Proficient and Advanced; however, there is still a gap compared to our Caucasian students who scored 81% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content and Style and Reading Literary and Practical Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Sentence Formation. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011-2012 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 50% of the East Poinsett County Juniors were proficient and 11% were advanced. This compares to the 49% proficiency at the state level and 19% advanced. There is a gap in proficiency between males and females with females scoring 73% proficient and advanced and males scoring 52% proficient and advanced; however, we did see a decrease in this discrepancy . We also identified a gap in achievement between the African Americans and the Caucasians. The African Americans had a proficiency rate of 25% while the Caucasians had 71% proficiency. The weakest area for the EPC Juniors was open responses for content reading passages and practical reading. The strength was in writing mechanics, usage, and sentence formation.
  4. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT: EPC 2014 average ACT English score was 18.0 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.1. The average composite score was 18.1. EPC 2013 average ACT English score was 16.5 and the average ACT Reading score was 17.2. The average composite score was 16.7. EPC 2012 average ACT English score was 18.3 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.2. The average composite score was 18.3.
  5. 2013 School Graduation Rate is 88.57, which met our AMO of 81.82% graduated. We are achieving in this area, but we will continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2012-2013 This data recording period shows a graduation rate of 71.43. This is below our AMO which requires us to be at 79.80% graduated. We also are below on our three year data period in which we are at 74.86% graduated, which is below our AMO goal of 79.80%. This remains as a weakness and we continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2011-2012 School year shows a graduation rate of 76.92%. This is below our AMO which requires us to be 79.78% graduated. We have identified this as a weakness and strive to increase our graduation rate.
Goal For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year at the high school, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth. For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: Implement the use of technology to improve literacy scores and enhance student learning.
Scientific Based Research: Enriquez, Amelito G. "Enhancing Student Performance Using Tablet Computers." College Teaching 58.3 (2010): 77-84. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Maintain Instructional Assistant for Plato Lab and ALE for students in the Junior and Senior High building . FTE 1.0 1140/61000-62000
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Teri Boon, Instructional Assistant, Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,899.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,899.00
Maintain Remediation Coach for Senior High Building to assist in Plato Program. In order to increase our Graduation Rate and decrease the number of students repeating courses, we will offer course recovery during the summer months. Remediation Coach will be paid for summer services. FTE 1.0 1140/61000/62000
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
Arnessa Joplin-Remediaton Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,024.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,024.00
Distance Learning para-pro hired with NSLA funds to run and assist with distant learning classes. Journalism,Spanish I and II, and Calculus are offered.FTE:1.00 1120/61000/62000
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Tammy Turner,Para-pro Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,524.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,524.00
Total Budget: $40,447.00
Intervention: Implement programs that raise ACT test scores for all students taking ACT tests.
Scientific Based Research: Higgins, Betty, Melinda Miller, and Susan Wegmann. "Teaching To The Test...Not! Balancing Best Practice And Testing Requirements In Writing." Reading Teacher 60.4 (2006): 310-319. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
ACT classes in English, Reading, Math, and Science Reasoning are offered during the summer. Refresher classes are offered during school year before test dates. Purchase of 7 ACT tests for participating students and stipends for three teachers.1140/61000/62000/68000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doug Skipper-Teacher, Jennifer Fithen-Teacher, Melody Couch-Teacher Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $4,500.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,500.00
Total Budget: $4,500.00
Intervention: New teaching strategies will be implemented to enhance instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Williams, Debra L. "Which Literacy Interventions Work For Adolescents That Continue To Struggle With Reading In High School And How Will They Be Provided?." Online Submission (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Due to high student absenteeism in the high school, the Interventionist will phone parents daily, counseling and encouraging them to see that their child attends school regularly. He will conduct weekly meetings with students who are at risk of not achieving, will meet and counsel at risk students in an attempt to identify whether their low performance is due to poor attendance, low skill level, or both. After identification has been made, he will work with the principal,teachers, and instructional coaches to provide interventions to improve student achievement. He will set up meetings with students and parents to discuss the importance of an education. He will oversee daily faculty advisory period, by distributing curriculum plans weekly. EVALUATION a call log will be maintained and daily attendance recorded for data effectiveness for the 2013-2014 school year. FTE.4914 1140
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Program Evaluation
Action Type: Special Education
John Kelly, Brian Weathers Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $27,936.00

ACTION BUDGET: $27,936.00
Total Budget: $27,936.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $41927
Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. BENCHMARK EXAM 2013/2014 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 47% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 90% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 76% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were in Reading Practical Passages 84% proficent compared to the state’s 82% and Writing across the board is higher than the state. Weaknesses for this test were in the Reading of Literary Passages and Writing: Style Domain; however, we were just a few points from the state averages for both of these areas. BENCHMARK EXAM 2012/2013- 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 40% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 89% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 66% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were Writing Usage and Mechanics and our weaknesses were in Literary Open Responses. BENCHMARK EXAM 2011/2012- 7TH Grade Literacy Exam The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy exam for this exam were 40% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We noticed a decline in our discrepancy between the male and female population with females scoring 77% Proficient and Advanced and males scoring 53% Proficient and Advanced. Strengths for students were in Writing Usage and Mechanics while areas of low performance were in Content Reading passages.
  2. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013/2014 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 78% with 51% of students scoring Proficient and 27% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap decrease between our male and female population with 81% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 75% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in all aspects of Writing, where we scored above state average in all areas. Another strength was in Reading Literary Passages where we scored 6.2 versus the state’s 6.0. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Mulitple Choice questions and Reading Practical Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012/2013 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 60% with 30% of students scoring Proficient and 30% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap increase between our male and female population with 75% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 50% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Reading Multiple Choice on the Content Passage and Open Responses on Literary Passages. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Content and Style and Reading Practical Passages and Content Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011/2012 The 2011-2012 Exam showed that 59% of students were proficient and 18% of students were advanced. We saw a decline in the gap between the male to female proficiency levels with females scoring 65% proficient or advanced and males scoring 54% proficient or advanced. For the eighth grade test students showed strength in reading practical passages and a weakness in reading literary passages. In writing there was strength in sentence formation and a weakness in content and style.
  3. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013-2014 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 48% of students scored Proficient and 18% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 24% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 83% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 50% Proficient and Advanced. We did see a decline in our African American population with 20% scoring Proficient and Advanced; compared to our Caucasian students who scored 70% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content, Mechanics, and Style and Reading Content Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage, Writing Mulitple Choice, and Reading Literary Passages. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012-2013 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 54% of students scored Proficient and 15% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 81% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 62% Proficient and Advanced. We did see gains in our African American population with 33% scoring Proficient and Advanced; however, there is still a gap compared to our Caucasian students who scored 81% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content and Style and Reading Literary and Practical Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Sentence Formation. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011-2012 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 50% of the East Poinsett County Juniors were proficient and 11% were advanced. This compares to the 49% proficiency at the state level and 19% advanced. There is a gap in proficiency between males and females with females scoring 73% proficient and advanced and males scoring 52% proficient and advanced; however, we did see a decrease in this discrepancy . We also identified a gap in achievement between the African Americans and the Caucasians. The African Americans had a proficiency rate of 25% while the Caucasians had 71% proficiency. The weakest area for the EPC Juniors was open responses for content reading passages and practical reading. The strength was in writing mechanics, usage, and sentence formation.
  4. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT: EPC 2014 average ACT English score was 18.0 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.1. The average composite score was 18.1. EPC 2013 average ACT English score was 16.5 and the average ACT Reading score was 17.2. The average composite score was 16.7. EPC 2012 average ACT English score was 18.3 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.2. The average composite score was 18.3.
  5. 2013 School Graduation Rate is 88.57, which met our AMO of 81.82% graduated. We are achieving in this area, but we will continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2012-2013 This data recording period shows a graduation rate of 71.43. This is below our AMO which requires us to be at 79.80% graduated. We also are below on our three year data period in which we are at 74.86% graduated, which is below our AMO goal of 79.80%. This remains as a weakness and we continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2011-2012 School year shows a graduation rate of 76.92%. This is below our AMO which requires us to be 79.78% graduated. We have identified this as a weakness and strive to increase our graduation rate.
Goal For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year at the high school, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth. For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: New teaching strategies will be implemented to enhance instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Williams, Debra L. "Which Literacy Interventions Work For Adolescents That Continue To Struggle With Reading In High School And How Will They Be Provided?." Online Submission (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
"G/K" EPC Jr. High and High School will provide professional development for our teachers based on weaknesses determined through student performance. PD funds and state funds will provide professional development for all teachers to attend State and National conferences approved by principal. In order to ensure that all students are being reached equally, teachers will be trained and utilize new teaching methods and strategies. Purchase of Books and Workbooks and Posters for every teacher. 2210/63000-65000
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
John Kelly, Principal Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • District Staff
  • Outside Consultants
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $2,391.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,391.00
Total Budget: $2,391.00
Intervention: "Reading Strategies"
Scientific Based Research: Williams, Debra L. "Which Literacy Interventions Work For Adolescents That Continue To Struggle With Reading In High School And How Will They Be Provided?." Online Submission (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
TITLE I SCHOOLWIDE #10 "I" COORDINATION OF FUNDS: EPC High School and Jr. High School will purchase materials for classroom teachers to help support comprehensive literacy. Teachers will use explanation and modeling, guided reading practices, and sustained silent reading with charts and diagrams,project base learning assessments, and career and technology books to improve reading strategies. Purchase of monthly non-fiction monthly publications for additional relevant reading in classrooms and FLOCABULARY to aid in the vocabulary instruction.1591/66000 1140/67000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jennifer Fithen, Doug Skipper, Rosalie Craig Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $550.00

ACTION BUDGET: $550.00
Total Budget: $550.00
Priority 2: Achieving School in Math
Supporting Data:
  1. The 2013/2014 7th Grade Benchmark Exam: The scores for the 7th Grade Benchmark exam showed an overall proficiency rate of 46% and an advance rate of 22%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 47% Proficient and 21% Advanced. The weaknesses for students on this exam were Measurement for the multiple choice questions and the open response question. Strengths were in Numbers and Operations on multiple choice and Geometry Open Responses. The 2012/2013 7th Grade Benchmark Exam: The scores for the 7th Grade Benchmark exam showed an overall proficiency rate of 31% and an advance rate of 35%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 33% Proficient and 30% Advanced. The weaknesses for students on this exam were Measurement for the multiple choice questions and numbers and operations for the open response questions. Strengths were in Numbers and operations and Data Analysis and Probability in multiple choice. The 2011/2012 7th Grade Benchmark Exam: The scores for the 7th Grade Benchmark exam reflected an overall proficiency rate of 54% and an advance rate of 27%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 49% Proficient and 16% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 58% Proficient and 27% Advanced. The weaknesses for students on this exam were Measurement for the multiple choice questions and numbers and operations for the open response questions. Strengths were in Numbers and operations in multiple choice and Measurement in open response questions, in which students scored higher than the state averages.
  2. The 2013/2014 8th Grade Benchmark Exam. The scores for the 8th Grade Benchmark exam reflected an overall proficiency rate of 41% and an advance rate of 22%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 41% Proficient and 20% Advanced. The weaknesses for the 8th grade were the Geometry Multiple Choice questions and Open Response Questions. The strengths were Numbers and Operations multiple choice questions and Data Analysis and Probability open responses. The 2012/2013 8th Grade Benchmark Exam. The scores for this exam showed 43% Proficient and 15% Advanced. Our data showed that our strengths are in multiple choice numbers and operations, Algebra multiple choice, and data analysis and probability open responses. We identified our weaknesses as open response measurements and algebra open responses. The 2011/2012 8th Grade Benchmark Exam. The scores for the 8th Grade Benchmark exam reflected an overall proficiency rate of 45% and an advance rate of 14%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 43% Proficient and 11% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 47% Proficient and 14% Advanced. The weaknesses for the 8th grade were the Data Analysis and Probability open responses and the Data Analysis and Probability and Measurement multiple choice questions. The strengths were Numbers and Operations multiple choice questions and the Geometry open responses.
  3. EOC-Algebra Exam Benchmark 2013-2014 Exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 32% and an Advance rate of 23%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 29% Proficient and 18% Advanced. The weaknesses for this test were Linear Functions on Multiple Choice and Non-Linear Functions on Open Responses. The strengths were Language of Algebra on Multiple Choice and solving Equations and inequalities on Open Responses. END OF COURSE ALGEBRA EXAM 2012-2013: This exam showed an overall Proficiency rating of 60% and Advanced rating of 28%. This is an increase over last year’s scores. The strengths for this exam were the Language of Algebra and Linear Functions and the weakness was Solving Equations. EOC-Algebra Exam Benchmark 2011-2012 exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 51% and an Advance rate of 30%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 54% Proficient and 31% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 59% Proficient and 35% Advanced. The weaknesses for this test were Solving Equations and Linear Functions. The strengths were Language of Algebra and probability.
  4. 2013-2014 EOC-Geometry Benchmark Exam. The scores for the Geometry EOC exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 61% and an Advance rate of 8%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 58% Proficient and 9% Advanced. The weaknesses for this assessment were Triangle Multiple Choice and Triangle on Open Response. The strengths were Language of Geometry on Multiple Choice and Measurements on Open Response. 2012-2013 End-of-Course Geometry Benchmark Exam: The scores for this exam reflected an overall Proficiency Rate of 53% and Advanced Rate of 14%. The weaknesses for this assessment was relationships between 2 and 3 dimensions and measurement. The strengths was Language of Geometry. 2011-2012 EOC-Geometry Benchmark Exam The scores for the Geometry EOC exam reflected an overall Proficiency rate of 31% and an Advance rate of 25%. The Economically Disadvantaged students scored 33% Proficient and 20% Advanced. The Caucasian population scored 30% Proficient and 30% Advanced. The weaknesses for this assessment were Coordinate Geometry and Transformations. The strengths were Language of Geometry.
  5. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT EPC 2014 average ACT Math score was 17.7 EPC 2013 average ACT Math score was 16.6 EPC 2012 average ACT Math score was 18.2
Goal For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: Develop Individual Academic Improvement Plan.
Scientific Based Research: Arkansas Department of Education Rules Governing the Arkansas Comprehensive Testing, Assessment and Accountability Program and the Academic Distress Program, July 2010. http://www.arkansased.org/public/userfiles/Legal/LegalCurrent20Rules/ade_247_actaap_0710_current.pdf
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Individual student tutoring, using computer software or a highly qualified teacher during an enrichment period or study skills class, is available for students who request or are referred for assistance. Additionally, before school and after school tutoring is available through a teacher or on-line program. In order to ensure that all students have equal access to technology, computers will be available before school and after school for student use. Purchase of 43 computers.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jamie Carpenter, Angie Rogers, Veta Hall, Monty May, Hayden Wood, Arnessa Joplin Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $37,186.00

ACTION BUDGET: $37,186.00
Total Budget: $37,186.00
Intervention: Teachers will work on improving basic skills necessary to ensure student success in math and science classes.
Scientific Based Research: Peterson, Shelley Stagg. "Teaching Content With The Help Of Writing Across The Curriculum." Middle School Journal 39.2 (2007): 26-33. ERIC. Web. 11 Sept. 2013.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Students will increase their knowledge through the use of inquiry based learning by engaging in science labs that reinforce fundamental math skills. This will also be EVALUATED through the EOC Biology scores in which 29% of students were proficient or advanced for 2013-2014 school year. Science lab materials, Foss kits will be purchased to offer real world, kinesthetic learning opportunities to all students.1140/66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Program Evaluation
Donna Parrish,Bo Powell- Science, Debora Gordon- Science Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $1,800.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,800.00
Total Budget: $1,800.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $266
Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. BENCHMARK EXAM 2013/2014 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 47% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 90% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 76% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were in Reading Practical Passages 84% proficent compared to the state’s 82% and Writing across the board is higher than the state. Weaknesses for this test were in the Reading of Literary Passages and Writing: Style Domain; however, we were just a few points from the state averages for both of these areas. BENCHMARK EXAM 2012/2013- 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 40% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 89% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 66% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were Writing Usage and Mechanics and our weaknesses were in Literary Open Responses. BENCHMARK EXAM 2011/2012- 7TH Grade Literacy Exam The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy exam for this exam were 40% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We noticed a decline in our discrepancy between the male and female population with females scoring 77% Proficient and Advanced and males scoring 53% Proficient and Advanced. Strengths for students were in Writing Usage and Mechanics while areas of low performance were in Content Reading passages.
  2. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013/2014 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 78% with 51% of students scoring Proficient and 27% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap decrease between our male and female population with 81% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 75% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in all aspects of Writing, where we scored above state average in all areas. Another strength was in Reading Literary Passages where we scored 6.2 versus the state’s 6.0. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Mulitple Choice questions and Reading Practical Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012/2013 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 60% with 30% of students scoring Proficient and 30% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap increase between our male and female population with 75% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 50% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Reading Multiple Choice on the Content Passage and Open Responses on Literary Passages. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Content and Style and Reading Practical Passages and Content Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011/2012 The 2011-2012 Exam showed that 59% of students were proficient and 18% of students were advanced. We saw a decline in the gap between the male to female proficiency levels with females scoring 65% proficient or advanced and males scoring 54% proficient or advanced. For the eighth grade test students showed strength in reading practical passages and a weakness in reading literary passages. In writing there was strength in sentence formation and a weakness in content and style.
  3. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013-2014 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 48% of students scored Proficient and 18% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 24% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 83% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 50% Proficient and Advanced. We did see a decline in our African American population with 20% scoring Proficient and Advanced; compared to our Caucasian students who scored 70% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content, Mechanics, and Style and Reading Content Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage, Writing Mulitple Choice, and Reading Literary Passages. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012-2013 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 54% of students scored Proficient and 15% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 81% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 62% Proficient and Advanced. We did see gains in our African American population with 33% scoring Proficient and Advanced; however, there is still a gap compared to our Caucasian students who scored 81% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content and Style and Reading Literary and Practical Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Sentence Formation. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011-2012 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 50% of the East Poinsett County Juniors were proficient and 11% were advanced. This compares to the 49% proficiency at the state level and 19% advanced. There is a gap in proficiency between males and females with females scoring 73% proficient and advanced and males scoring 52% proficient and advanced; however, we did see a decrease in this discrepancy . We also identified a gap in achievement between the African Americans and the Caucasians. The African Americans had a proficiency rate of 25% while the Caucasians had 71% proficiency. The weakest area for the EPC Juniors was open responses for content reading passages and practical reading. The strength was in writing mechanics, usage, and sentence formation.
  4. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT: EPC 2014 average ACT English score was 18.0 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.1. The average composite score was 18.1. EPC 2013 average ACT English score was 16.5 and the average ACT Reading score was 17.2. The average composite score was 16.7. EPC 2012 average ACT English score was 18.3 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.2. The average composite score was 18.3.
  5. 2013 School Graduation Rate is 88.57, which met our AMO of 81.82% graduated. We are achieving in this area, but we will continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2012-2013 This data recording period shows a graduation rate of 71.43. This is below our AMO which requires us to be at 79.80% graduated. We also are below on our three year data period in which we are at 74.86% graduated, which is below our AMO goal of 79.80%. This remains as a weakness and we continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2011-2012 School year shows a graduation rate of 76.92%. This is below our AMO which requires us to be 79.78% graduated. We have identified this as a weakness and strive to increase our graduation rate.
Goal For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year at the high school, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth. For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: Implement programs that raise ACT test scores for all students taking ACT tests.
Scientific Based Research: Higgins, Betty, Melinda Miller, and Susan Wegmann. "Teaching To The Test...Not! Balancing Best Practice And Testing Requirements In Writing." Reading Teacher 60.4 (2006): 310-319. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
ACT classes in English, Reading, Math, and Science Reasoning are offered during the summer. Refresher classes are offered during school year before test dates. Purchase of 7 ACT tests for participating students and stipends for three teachers.1140/61000/62000/68000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doug Skipper-Teacher, Jennifer Fithen-Teacher, Melody Couch-Teacher Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects: $266.00

ACTION BUDGET: $266.00
Total Budget: $266.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $58102
Priority 1: Achieving School in Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. BENCHMARK EXAM 2013/2014 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 47% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 90% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 76% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were in Reading Practical Passages 84% proficent compared to the state’s 82% and Writing across the board is higher than the state. Weaknesses for this test were in the Reading of Literary Passages and Writing: Style Domain; however, we were just a few points from the state averages for both of these areas. BENCHMARK EXAM 2012/2013- 7TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy Exam for this year were 40% Proficient and 36% Advanced. We are still watching a gap between our male and female population with females scoring 89% Proficient and Advanced over the males who scored 66% Proficient or Advanced. The strengths for our students were Writing Usage and Mechanics and our weaknesses were in Literary Open Responses. BENCHMARK EXAM 2011/2012- 7TH Grade Literacy Exam The overall results of the 7th Grade Literacy exam for this exam were 40% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We noticed a decline in our discrepancy between the male and female population with females scoring 77% Proficient and Advanced and males scoring 53% Proficient and Advanced. Strengths for students were in Writing Usage and Mechanics while areas of low performance were in Content Reading passages.
  2. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013/2014 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 78% with 51% of students scoring Proficient and 27% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap decrease between our male and female population with 81% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 75% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in all aspects of Writing, where we scored above state average in all areas. Another strength was in Reading Literary Passages where we scored 6.2 versus the state’s 6.0. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Mulitple Choice questions and Reading Practical Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012/2013 The overall results for the 8th Grade Literacy Exam were 60% with 30% of students scoring Proficient and 30% of students scoring Advanced. We saw a gap increase between our male and female population with 75% of females scoring Proficient or Advanced and males scoring 50% Proficient or Advanced. The identifiable strengths on this exam were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Reading Multiple Choice on the Content Passage and Open Responses on Literary Passages. The weaknesses we identified were in Writing Content and Style and Reading Practical Passages and Content Passages. BENCHMARK 8TH GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011/2012 The 2011-2012 Exam showed that 59% of students were proficient and 18% of students were advanced. We saw a decline in the gap between the male to female proficiency levels with females scoring 65% proficient or advanced and males scoring 54% proficient or advanced. For the eighth grade test students showed strength in reading practical passages and a weakness in reading literary passages. In writing there was strength in sentence formation and a weakness in content and style.
  3. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2013-2014 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 48% of students scored Proficient and 18% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 24% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 83% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 50% Proficient and Advanced. We did see a decline in our African American population with 20% scoring Proficient and Advanced; compared to our Caucasian students who scored 70% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content, Mechanics, and Style and Reading Content Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage, Writing Mulitple Choice, and Reading Literary Passages. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2012-2013 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 54% of students scored Proficient and 15% scored Advanced. This compares to the state levels of 48% Proficient and 22% Advanced. We are still seeing an achievement gap at this level between our male and female population, with females scoring 81% Proficient and Advanced versus the males scoring 62% Proficient and Advanced. We did see gains in our African American population with 33% scoring Proficient and Advanced; however, there is still a gap compared to our Caucasian students who scored 81% Proficient and Advanced. Our strengths on this exam were Writing Content and Style and Reading Literary and Practical Passages. Our weaknesses were in Writing Usage and Mechanics and Sentence Formation. 11th GRADE LITERACY EXAM 2011-2012 On the 11th Grade Literacy Exam, 50% of the East Poinsett County Juniors were proficient and 11% were advanced. This compares to the 49% proficiency at the state level and 19% advanced. There is a gap in proficiency between males and females with females scoring 73% proficient and advanced and males scoring 52% proficient and advanced; however, we did see a decrease in this discrepancy . We also identified a gap in achievement between the African Americans and the Caucasians. The African Americans had a proficiency rate of 25% while the Caucasians had 71% proficiency. The weakest area for the EPC Juniors was open responses for content reading passages and practical reading. The strength was in writing mechanics, usage, and sentence formation.
  4. With a 36 being the highest score to make on the ACT: EPC 2014 average ACT English score was 18.0 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.1. The average composite score was 18.1. EPC 2013 average ACT English score was 16.5 and the average ACT Reading score was 17.2. The average composite score was 16.7. EPC 2012 average ACT English score was 18.3 and the average ACT Reading score was 18.2. The average composite score was 18.3.
  5. 2013 School Graduation Rate is 88.57, which met our AMO of 81.82% graduated. We are achieving in this area, but we will continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2012-2013 This data recording period shows a graduation rate of 71.43. This is below our AMO which requires us to be at 79.80% graduated. We also are below on our three year data period in which we are at 74.86% graduated, which is below our AMO goal of 79.80%. This remains as a weakness and we continue to strive to increase our graduation rate. 2011-2012 School year shows a graduation rate of 76.92%. This is below our AMO which requires us to be 79.78% graduated. We have identified this as a weakness and strive to increase our graduation rate.
Goal For the 2014 School Year, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year at the high school, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth. For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow.
Intervention: Implement the use of technology to improve literacy scores and enhance student learning.
Scientific Based Research: Enriquez, Amelito G. "Enhancing Student Performance Using Tablet Computers." College Teaching 58.3 (2010): 77-84. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
TITLE I SCHOOLWIDE #9/H TIMELY AND EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION: Instruction will be provided for weak areas determined from test data and class performance. Continuing of purchase of PLATO software for 40 licenses, if needed, for students to have access to programs teaching grammar, linguistics, technical and creative writing skills,appropiate word choice, & vocabulary and continuing the Plato Support contract. 1140/67000
Action Type: Equity
Action Type: Special Education
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
Rosalie Craig, Douglas Skipper, Jennifer Fithen, Teri Boon, A. Joplin Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $38,500.00

ACTION BUDGET: $38,500.00
Total Budget: $38,500.00
Intervention: Implement programs that raise ACT test scores for all students taking ACT tests.
Scientific Based Research: Higgins, Betty, Melinda Miller, and Susan Wegmann. "Teaching To The Test...Not! Balancing Best Practice And Testing Requirements In Writing." Reading Teacher 60.4 (2006): 310-319. ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Counselors review EXPLORER and PLAN scores with students and parents and explain the role of ACT scores in the college process. A career counselor, Mary Williams, who is shared with Marked Tree High School, is paid for services that help students transition into college.
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Payton Weathers, Counselor Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Community Leaders
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $13,086.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,086.00
Total Budget: $13,086.00
Intervention: New teaching strategies will be implemented to enhance instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Williams, Debra L. "Which Literacy Interventions Work For Adolescents That Continue To Struggle With Reading In High School And How Will They Be Provided?." Online Submission (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Grades will be maintained online for parents to review. ACT 307 "F" Parent-Teacher conferences and 4-week progress reports will inform parents as will a newsletter. PARENTAL ENGAGEMENT HH ACT 397 EPC will conduct formal and non-formal meetings, and community wide orientation of students' progress. Through these resources, parent feedback is encouraged. East Poinsett County School District will have a PARENT FACILITATOR. Maintain support for Global Scholar On-Course lesson plan program.63000-65000/
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
District Staff, Christie Austin-Parent Facilitator Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $5,516.00

ACTION BUDGET: $5,516.00
Total Budget: $5,516.00
Intervention: "Reading Strategies"
Scientific Based Research: Williams, Debra L. "Which Literacy Interventions Work For Adolescents That Continue To Struggle With Reading In High School And How Will They Be Provided?." Online Submission (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Sept. 2012.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Oral fluency will be monitored using a grade level text. Students will be encouraged to utilize reading strategies through independent library reading. Purchase Follett software to aid in library usage.
Action Type: Alignment
Jennifer Fithen, Rosalie Craig, Douglas Skipper Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $1,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,000.00
Total Budget: $1,000.00

EAST POINSETT CO. SCHOOL DIST. -- $50521.2

Source of Funds

For: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries, NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies, NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects, NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services.


Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $16073.4
Priority 4: Wellness
Supporting Data:
  1. "Let's Get Physical-Promotion and Education Strategies" by Dr. Hal Wechsler. http://www.fns.usda.gov./oabe/menu/NNEC/Files/2003/LetsGetPhysical.pdf
Goal Students participating in the BMI activity will show physical improvements and be more educated in health and safety issues.
Benchmark The measurements taken during the 2013-14 school year will reflect a decrease of the average Body Mass Index for students by one-half percent from the previous year as evaluated by the annual BMI screening for grades K,2,4,6,8, and 10. EVALUATION: The BMI Classifications are as follows for the East Poinsett County School District in 2013-2014: The BMI classifications for male and female students in each grade are listed below: 2013-2014 BMI Results Kindergarten: 39 males were tested, 66.7% were healthy or underweight and 33.3% were overweight or obese. 28 females were tested, 64.3% were healthy or underweight and 35.7% were overweight or obese. FIRST GRADE n/a SECOND GRADE: 32 males were tested, 56.2% were healthy or underweight and 43.8% were overweight or obese. 17 females were tested, 70.6% were healthy or underweight and 29.4% were overweight or obese. THIRD GRADE: n/a FOURTH GRADE: 26 males were tested, 30.8% were healthy or underweight and 69.2% were overweight or obese. 21 females were tested, 52.4% were healthy or underweight and 47.6% were overweight or obese. FIFTH GRADE n/a SIXTH GRADE 20 males were tested, 35% were healthy or underweight and 65% were overweight or obese. 32 females were tested, 40.6% were healthy or underweight and 59.4% were overweight or obese.
Intervention: All students participating in BMI activities will show improvement in their cardiovascular muscle strength/endurance and flexibility.
Scientific Based Research: "Development and Promotion of Walking Trails", "On the GO": http://walk.hhp.ufl.edu/
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
The district through NSLA funding will pay for all students that are reduced pay breakfast and lunches. Breakfast:129x 178 days=22962 x.30Cents=$6888. Lunch:129 studentsx178 days=22962 meals x.40=$9184
Action Type: Wellness
Carolyn Harrson, Food Director Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects: $16,073.40

ACTION BUDGET: $16,073.40
Total Budget: $16,073.40

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $34447.8
Priority 1: Administrative
Supporting Data:
  1. Academic data in each building plan will be evaluated every year for effectiveness toward impacting student achievement.
Goal The administration of East Poinsett County continues to verify its compliance with the laws governing education in the state of Arkansas and requirements governing allocation of federal funds to ensure that a quality, equitable education is provided to all students in a functional, safe environment.
Benchmark The administration will provide various means of evaluating the schools' academic programs.
Benchmark For the 2014 School Year at the high school, we have been labeled as an Achieving School in Literacy. We have met all four criteria of AMO by scoring 75.94% in Performance over our needed 65.04%; showing Growth of 81.31% over our needed 68.09%; scoring 70.29% performance over a three year period over our needed 65.04%; and showing 73.86% growth over three years over our needed 68.09%. We will continue to identify our weakness and accommodate our teaching to reflect our continued growth. We are in Achieving School in Literacy Status because we have meet the requirement of our AMO in both growth and performance, through the evaluation of our Benchmark Exams, 11th Grade Literacy Exams, and ITBS. For the 2014 School Year, We have been labeled as Achieving in Mathematics. Our goal for the 2014-2015 school year is the continued growth towards our AMO goal. We have been labeled as an Achieving School in Math. Our school has shown a Growth Performance of 67.29% which was our targeted AMO for Growth. We will work to address our identified weaknesses and continue to grow. We have been labeled as an ACHIEVING SCHOOL IN GRADUATION RATE, because we met our AMO for this area. We will meet the requirements for teachers and paraprofessionals by participating in the necessary professional development and other programs to continue growth on our AMO. We will provide parents information on our status, and we will work with them to ensure the success of our students.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014 in literacy. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85 in literacy. Tyronza Elementary scored a 59.09 in Math. We are a Needs Improvement school in Math. We will continue to strive to show growth in 2014-2015 school year, in order to make AMO of 83.12. Lepanto Elementary scored 87.27% for combined population in Literacy. We will continue to enhance our students knowledge base as set forth in the Common Core State Standards. The 2014 CRT indicated combined population scored 85% for third grade and fourth grade scored 54%. We will continue to move our third and fourth grade students to the proficient or advanced level on the Math portion of the upcoming PARRC assessment. We have adopted Common Core Standards at Lepanto Elementary. Our scores on the ACTAAP were as follows: THIRD GRADE: Combined Population 85% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra (67%), Measurement (56%), Data/Probability (62%), Numbers/Operations (72%)OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (53%), Algebra (68%), Data/Probability (50%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%); OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry (1%), Measurement (15%). FOURTH GRADE Combined Population 54% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS IN MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers/Operations (73%), Algebra (56%), Data/Probability (58%); OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement (55%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Intervention: The East Poinsett County School District will provide administrative support for the Title I program in literacy and math. The district supports the schools by providing the services of a math coach, and two literacy coaches.
Scientific Based Research: Knight, Jim. (2007).Instructional Coaching: A Partnership Approach to Improving Instruction. Corwin Press.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Evaluation: Principals will conduct at least five classroom observations per week. Written feedback that will help support classroom instruction and student learning will be provided to teachers. Principals will develop a list of focus points based on classroom observations that can be used for monitoring expectations. Principals will maintain a log of classroom observations. A summative evaluation is conducted at the end of the school year. The evaluation is based on Pathwise practices for quality instruction. The math coach and the literacy coaches will also support the elementary and high school's improvement efforts by observing/modeling in classrooms to support teachers in their implementation of the curriculum and in the use of research-based instructional strategies. Instructional facilitators will support elementary school improvement efforts in math and literacy through observing/modeling in classrooms. Weekly grade level meetings will be held at the elementary schools to discuss student data and teachers' instructional needs. Sign-in sheets, agendas, and meeting notes will be maintained. High school teachers in core content areas will meet at least quarterly to discuss student data and teachers' instructional needs. We will move forward with the new AR Teacher Excellence and Support System. Purchased for 6 teachers X $ 36.00 "Enhancing professional practice a framework for teaching" books By Charlotte Daniels and binders.
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Equity
Action Type: Program Evaluation
Action Type: Special Education
Gary Williams- Principal, Jacinda Prince - Principal Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • District Staff
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $216.00

ACTION BUDGET: $216.00
Total Budget: $216.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance literacy instruction for all students will continue to implement across all content areas.
Scientific Based Research: Improving Reading Comprehension in Kindergarten through 3rd Grade. (2010). What Works Clearinghouse. Improving Adolescent Literacy: Effective Classroom and Intervention Practices. ((2008). What Works Clearinghouse. Harvey, S. and Goudvis, A. (2007). Strategies that Work: Teaching Comprehension for Understanding and Engagement. Forget, Mark. (2004). MAX Teaching with Reading and Writing. Trafford Publishing.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
The East Poinsett County District will continue the Total Instructional Alignment process to review and/or refine curriculum development. Common Core State Standards will be fully implemented in grades K-8. Instructional resources will be provided and technology will be utilized for collaborative lesson planning. This curriculum tool will allow for productive professional collaboration in both vertical and horizontal aligment of the curriculum in all buildings and throughout the district. This process will benefit the students in that there will be a logical progression of learning throughout the K-12 curriculum. Pacing guides will be revised in math and literacy. These pacing guides will be used to identify curriculum gaps and overlaps. The pacing guides will be reviewed at the end of each module to identify curriculum strengths and areas that must be supplemented. Adjustments will be made as necessary based upon student instructional needs. The pacing guides in math and literacy will serve as the baseline document to fully develop the curriculum. Curriculum for all areas will be developed based upon Common Core or state standards, depending upon the content area. Key components of the curriculum include student learning objectives, key vocabulary, scientifically based instructional strategies, resources, formative assessments, essential questions, and enduring understandings. The Total Instructional Alignment process will be utilized to develop the curriculum. Grades 9-12 will take preliminary steps toward full Common Core State Standard implementation.2540/63000-65000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Jacinda Prince,elem. principal, Gary Williams,high school principal Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Central Office
  • Computers
  • District Staff
  • Outside Consultants
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $20,843.00

ACTION BUDGET: $20,843.00
The East Poinsett County District has adopted the state's recommended common core standards for K-12 instruction. Elementary teachers have been trained in ELLA and Effective Literacy and literacy facilitators will provide support in implementing the common core standards into the curriculum. Literacy teachers in grades 5-12 will employ best practices for adolescent literacy instruction. To support the jr. high/high school with its improvement efforts, secondary teachers will be trained in reading and writing strategies that will be implemented in all content areas. Leadership will monitor the implementation of the instructional strategies through lesson plans and classroom observations. The district will monitor student growth through ongoing formative assessments in the classroom and the administration of interim assessments in literacy, math, and science (grades 3-8 and biology)provided through The Learning Institute. Plans for classroom instruction and student interventions will be based on the data derived from these assessments. Assessment walls will be used as visual displays to monitor student progress toward proficiency. Crowley's Ridge Coop charges the district $100.00 per certified staff and $3.00 per ADM for Professional Development activities presented by the Coop.
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Michael Pierce, superintendent Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Central Office
  • Computers
  • District Staff
  • Outside Consultants
  • Performance Assessments
  • School Library
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $8,757.00

ACTION BUDGET: $8,757.00
Total Budget: $29,600.00
Priority 5: School Improvement
Supporting Data:
  1. Lepanto Elementary is considered an Achieving School in Literacy by a score of 85.5% Proficient/Advanced. We scored Above the State Average. We will continue to make improvements in literacy to meet the AMO for 2013 of 77.32%. As we analyzed our data we will strive to improve in the following weak areas: In THIRD GRADE we will work on Literary and Practical Passages in the area of Multiple Choice. We will focus on Reading Practical and Writing Content in open response items. The data stated that for FOURTH GRADE we need to focus more on Reading Practical Passages in the multiple choice area and in open response the focus will be content. We will focus on Style Domain and the Content Domain in writing. Lepanto Elementary fell short of the goal of 84.89% by scoring 75%. We will strive to meet the AMO of 85.90% making 10.90% improvement. Lepanto Elementary is committed to improving student achievement in math. We will focus on our greatest areas of need being MULTIPLE CHOICE-GEOMETRY/DATA ANALYSIS AND PROBABILITY/MEASUREMENT. OPEN RESPONSE weak areas: DATA ANALYSIS AND PROBABILITY/NUMBERS & OPERATIONS. We will focus on these weak areas as well as teaching students how to justify their answers. The 2011 AYP reports identify the AYP status of each school as well as the district. Lepanto Elementary has an AYP status of Alert for not meeting standatds in literacy. Lepanto Elementary met standards for math. Tyronza Elementary has an AYP Status of Achieving for meeting standards in both math and literacy. The AYP Status for EPC High School is Whole School Improvement Year 2. The overall math status is SI_2. The overall literacy status is Alert. The overall district AYP improvement status is Alert. The K-5 district math and literacy status is SI_4 based on the students with disabilities sub-population. The 9-12 district math status is SI_2. The 9-12 district literacy status is SI_3. The district will provide support and guidance to each school to maintain or improve their AYP status.
  2. EPC High School scores declined during the 2010-2011 school year. Previous year's scores had shown an increase at most grade levels. NORMES information provides the following data: Scoring proficient or advanced in the combined population for literacy: 2010-2011=53.4%, 2009-2010=65.4%, 2008-2009=61.2%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the combined population for math: 2010-2011=67.5%, 2009-2010=69.2%, 2008-2009=51%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the economically disadvantaged population for literacy: 2010-2011= 49%, 2009-2010=60%, 2008-2009=54.2%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the economically disadvantaged population for math: 2010-2011=56.8%, 2009-2010=62.9%, 2008-2009=46.5%. Scores are reported for subpopulations; however, an insufficient number of students are present for actual sub-groups. Scoring proficient or advanced in the African-American population for literacy: 2010-2011=17.4%, 2009-2010=26.3%, 2008-2009=27.3%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the African-American population for math: 2010-2011=61.1%, 2009-2010=56.5%, 2008-2009=36%.
  3. Tyronza Elementary School scores have shown improvement at most grade levels over the past three years. NORMES information provides the following data: Scoring proficient or advanced in the combined population for literacy: 2010-2011=72.8%, 2009-2010=69.7%, 2008-2009=63.9%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the combined population for math: 2010-2011=74.7%, 2009-2010=61.3%, 2008-2009=76.4%. Tyronza Elementary is committed to improve math skills for all students. Tyronza Elementary scored 66.67. We are a Needs Improvement school in Math. Tyronza Elementary will strive to show a gain to meet our AMO of 78.90 in 2012-2013. Scoring proficient or advanced in the economically disadvantaged population for literacy: 2010-2011=70.5%, 2009-2010=65.8%, 2008-2009=58.7%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the economically disadvantaged population for math: 2010-2011=73%. 2009-2010=57%, 2008-2009=73.1%. Scores are reported for subpopulations; however, an insufficient number of students are present for actual sub-groups. Scoring proficient or advanced in the African-American population for literacy: 2010-2011=50%, 2009-2010=50%, 2008-2009=30.8%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the African-American population for math: 2010-2011=50%, 2009-2010=60%, 2008-2009=84.6%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the students with disabilities population for literacy: 2010-2011=17.1%, 2009-2010=18.8%, 2008-2009=13%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the students with disabilities population for math: 2010-2011=34.3$, 2009-2010=25%, 2008-2009=30.4%.
  4. Lepanto Elementary School scores have shown improvement at most grade levels over the past three years. NORMES information provides the following data: Scoring proficient or advanced in the combined population for literacy: 2010-2011=75.4%, 2009-2010=71.2%, 2008-2009=60.9%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the combined population for math: 2010-2011=83.1%, 2009-2010=77.3%, 2008-2009=85.5%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the economically disadvantaged population for literacy: 2010-2011=75%, 2009-2010=66.7%, 2008-2009=62.3%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the economically disadvantaged population for math: 2010-2011=82.1%, 2009-2010=73.7%, 2008-2009=83%. Scores are reported for subpopulations; however, an insufficient number of students are present for actual sub-groups. Scoring proficient or advanced in the African-American population for literacy: 2010-2011=70%, 2009-2010=40%, 2008-2009=75%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the African-American population for math: 2010-2011=90%, 2009-2010=80%, 2008-2009=100%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the students with disabilities population for literacy: 2010-2011=20%, 2009-2010=15.4%, 2008-2009=18.8%. Scoring proficient or advanced in the students with disabilities population for math: 2010-2011=46.7%, 2009-2010=53.8%, 2008-2009=50%.
  5. Additional supporting data are located in the individual building plans.
Goal The administration - along with parents and staff - will develop a district improvement plan to address various facets of instruction and learning during the 2014-2015 school year to enhance district-wide achievement. The district will focus on teaching, training, and instructing students to be mature, productive, and well-rounded adults.
Benchmark Each campus in the district will strive to meet or exceed AMO and student growth in the 2014-2015 school year.
Benchmark
Intervention: The district formed a Task Force that includes members of the administration, faculty, students, parents and community members,law enforcement,resource officer and EMT's for the purpose of communicating ideas to increase student motivation, citizenship, closing the achievement gap, and overall student achievement.Will evaluate the effectiveness by sign in sheets attendance for all meetings
Scientific Based Research: Price, Hugh B. (2008) Mobilizing the Community to Help Students Succeed. Marzano, Robert J. (2003). What Works in Schools pgs. 47-65.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Parents will be notified about school improvement status through a public meeting, newspaper articles, school web site posting, and direct communication from the district to patrons. The district will utilize an automated calling system to maintain parental contact and share information. Key personnel will be trained to activate the calling system
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Professional Development
Mickey Pierce, Superintendent Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,131.80

ACTION BUDGET: $2,131.80
Total Budget: $2,131.80
Intervention: The district will collaborate with the local educational cooperative and retain APSRC services for the district and for the buildings'professional development, instructional assistance, grant monies, and technology inclusion.
Scientific Based Research: Roy, P. and Preston, S. (2008) A tool kit for quality professional development in Arkansas. Arkansas Department of Education and National Staf Development Council. Price, H.(2008) Mobilizing the community to help students succeed.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
The district will retain APSRC to provide research base intensive professional development in the area of teaching and learning to alignment to common core and technology inclusion to help analyze and disaggregate data in Math and literacy to develop strategies and use these to reduce the achievment gap for our students. 2213/630000
Action Type: Collaboration
Michael Pierce, superintendent Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Community Leaders
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,500.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,500.00
Total Budget: $2,500.00

LEPANTO ELEMENTARY -- $125720

Source of Funds

For: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries, NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies, NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects, NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services.


Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $9941
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2013-2014 As we analyzed our data for the 2013-2014 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in Second Grade were: ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text; recount stories including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral; describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song; describe the overall structure of a story, including describing the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action; describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area; know and use various text features to locate key information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. Weak areas for THIRD GRADE were: ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language; refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters; ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; use text features and search tools to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently; distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use determiners; produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts; capitalize dates and names of people; use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series; use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Weak areas for FOURTH GRADE were: refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the meaning fo words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text; explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text; explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening; demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings; explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences; produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. Our weak areas in Third Grade were: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how (20%), know and use various text features (23%), describe how reasons support specific points the authors makes in a text (35%), identify the main topic of a multi paragraph text (44%), recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures (45%). Our weak areas in Fourth Grade were: Reading: refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a topic (19%), determine the main idea of a text; recount key details (31%), describe the relationship between a series of historical events (38%), ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text (38%), describe characters in a story (36%). Writing: demonstrate common of conventions of standard English grammar and usage (7%) demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization and punctuation (33%), produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentences (46%), use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series (47%). THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2012-2013 As we analyzed our data for the 2012-2013 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: article details;inference; main idea; literary element analysis; sequencing; vocabulary; literary devices; analysis; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area, know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. THIRD GRADE: article details; inference; literary devices; analysis; use text features and search tools to locate informatin relevant to a given topic efficiently; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; use abstract nouns; irregular nouns; subordinating conjunctions; commas; quotation marks. FOURTH GRADE: article details; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; main idea; analysis; explain how an author uses reasons for reading and evidence to support particular points in a text; fragments; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar adn usage when writing or speaking; metaphor; adage/proverb; demonstratives; adverbs; simple sentences. 2011-2012 As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our greatest need in SECOND GRADE were main topic of a multiparagraph text, identifying the main purpose of a text and know and use various text features. In SECOND GRADE WRITING demonstrate command of the conventions of standards, use commas in dates to separate single words and capitalize dates and names of people. THIRD GRADE'S weakest areas were in describe the relationship between a series, recount stories and including fables and folktales. In THIRD GRADE WRITING the data showed demonstrate command of conventions, and use knowledge of language and its conventions. . FOURTH GRADE data showed a need in the overall structure, describe in depth a character, setting or events, and determine the main idea of a text. In FOURTH GRADE WRITING the areas were produce simple, compound, and complex sentences and demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English. We will focus on these areas in both classroom instruction and intervention time.
  2. 2013-2014 ACTAAP Data According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, the data is as follows: COMBINED POPULATION: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 13% basic, 50% proficient, 25% advanced; NON DISABLED STUDENTS: 6% basic, 53% proficient, and 41% advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% proficient; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 17% below basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced. As we analyzed our data, we will strive to improve the following weak areas: CONTENT (58%) MULTIPLE CHOICE WRITING (54%) OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGES (45%) CONTENT (25%) PRACTICAL (41%) Our STRENGTHS were MULTIPLE CHOICE-LITERARY PASSAGE 62% PRACTICAL PASSAGE 71%; OPEN RESPONSE-WRITING CONTENT 61%, WRITING STYLE 63%, SENTENCE FORMATION 70%, USAGE 76%, MECHANICS 73%. 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% proficient. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, and 0% advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANAGED: 9% scored below basic, 30% scored basic, 26% scored proficient, and 36% scored advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 10% below basic, 0% basic, 30% proficient, and 60% advanced. As we analyzed our data we will strive to improve in the following weak areas: In THIRD GRADE we will work on Literary (50%), Content (50), Practical (38%) all being Open Response items. Our STRENGTHS were Multiple Choice: Content (63%), Practical (63%), Writing (63%), Content (65%), Style (65%), Sentence Formation (70%), Usage (84%), Mechanics (78%)/ 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES-0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-11% Below basic 5% Basic 84% Proficient/Advanced GENDER GAP FEMALE-7% Below Basic 7% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE 21% Below Basic 0% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced ETHNICITY-HISPANIC-40% Below Basic 0% Basic 60% Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN-6% Below Basic 6% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced Our Strengths included Multiple Choice Writing and Content Passage. Our strengths in Open Response were Reading Content and Writing Sentence Formation. We scored above State Average in all areas. We will focus on our weak areas being Multiple Choice Literacy Passage and Practical Passage. Our weak areas in Open Response were Reading Practical and Writing Content. 2013-2014 ACTAAP DATA According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the sub populations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 17% proficient, and 17% advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 39% proficient, 18% advanced; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 42% proficient, and 4% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 20% proficient, and 50% advanced. Our weak areas included WRITING MULTIPLE CHOICE (63%) and OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGE (35%). Our STRENGTHS were in the area of LITERARY PASSAGE (64%), CONTENT PASSAGE (71%) PRACTICAL (66%); open response-CONTENT PASSAGE (78%) PRACTICAL PASSAGE (63%), WRITING CONTENT (71%) STYLE (71%), SENTENCE FORMATION (80%) USAGE (89%) MECHANICS (80%) 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 90% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% advanced NON-DIABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% Advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 6% below basic, 3% basic, 42% proficient, and 48% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 11% basic, 33% proficient, and 56% advanced. In Fourth Grade, we will work on Literary (38%)and Practical (50%) in Open Response items. Our only weak area in Multiple Choice for Fourth Grade was Writing (50%). Our STRENGTHS included the following: all strands of Writing: Content(74%),Style (74%), Sentence Formation (88%), Usage (98%), Mechanics (86%); MULTIPLE CHOICE: Literary (63%), Content (75%), Practical (75%). OPEN RESPONSE: Content (63%). 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 87% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-3.1% Below Basic 11.1% Basic 86% Proficient/Advanced MALE-7.1% Below Basic 7.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE-0% Below Basic 13.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced WHITE-4.1% Below Basic 8.1% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced Our STRENGTHS in Multiple Choice include Writing-Multiple Choice. Open Response Reading Practical Passage, Writing Sentence Formation, Writing Usage, Writing Mechanics. Our WEAKEST areas in multiple choice was Reading Practical Passage. In Open Response Writing Style Domain, Writing Content Domain and Reading Content Domain.
  3. 2013-2014 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2014, FIRST GRADE: COMBINED POPULATION VOCABULARY Out of 31 students tested, 12 scored above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-out of 31 students tested, 15 scored above benchmark, SPELLING-31 students tested, 14 scored above benchmark. Weak areas being in VOCABULARY. SECOND GRADE ITBS DATA 2013-2014 COMBINED POPULATION-VOCABULARY 31.3% above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-43.8% above benchmark, SPELLING-43.7% above benchmark. Our weakest area being in VOCABULARY. 2012-2013 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2013, FIRST GRADE: VOCABULARY 26 out of 32 students scored below basic. 6 out of 32 students scored at or above benchmark. SPELLING: 18 out of 32 scored below basic. 14 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION: 17 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. 15 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE VOCABULARY: 14 out of 25 scored below benchmark. 11 out of 25 scored 44% at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark. 10 out of 25 scored below benchmark. Our STRENGTHS were in COMPREHENSION for both grades with 17 out of 32 scoring at or above benchmark in FIRST GRADE and 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark in SECOND GRADE. SECOND GRADE had a STRENGTH in SPELLING with 13 our of 25 scored at or above benchmark. Our WEAKNESSESS were in VOCABULARY with 26 out of 32 scoring below benchmark and SPELLING with 18 out of 32 scored below benchmark. According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2011-2012, out of 31 students tested, First Grade scored 41% in Reading and 47% in Language. When analyzing the subpopulations, they were as follows: African American-25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient HISPANIC-100% Below Basic CAUCASIAN-16.7% Below Basic 33.3% in Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED- 18.5 Below Basic 37% Basic 44% Proficient/Advanced SECOND GRADE 2011-2012 Overall, 36 students tested-38% Reading 40% Language. When the sub populations were analyzed the results are the following: African American-66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced Hispanic-50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Causasion-41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 41.6 Proficient/Advanced Economically Disadvantaged-46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced
  4. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2013-2014 KINDERGARTEN: EOY-46 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY-45 students were tested 44% scored at or above benchmark 18% scored some risk 38% scored at risk FIRST GRADE EOY-31 students were tested 32% scored at risk 10% scored some risk 58% scored at or above benchmark BOY:34 students were tested 64% scored at or above benchmark 21% scored some risk 15% scored at risk SECOND GRADE EOY-32 students were tested 6% scored at risk 16% scored some risk 78% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 16 students were tested 88% scored at or above benchmark 6% scored some risk 6% scored at risk THIRD GRADE EOY-24 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 15 students were tested 47% scored at or above benchmark 20% scored some risk 33% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2012-2013 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested 50%% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 33% scored low risk EOY-36 students were tested 81% scored low risk 11% scored some risk 8% scored at risk FIRST GRADE: BOY-36 students were tested 33% scored well below benchmark 19% scored below benchmark 48% scored at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 53 scored low risk 38 scored some risk 9% scored at risk SECOND GRADE: BOY-25 students were tested 84% students scored at or above benchmark 8% scored some risk 8% scored at risk EOY-24 students were tested 83% scored low risk 17% scored some risk 0 scored at risk THIRD GRADE: BOY- 36 students were tested 46% were well below benchmark 3% were below benchmark 51% were at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 62% scored low risk 3% scored some risk 46% scored at risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-40 students were tested 60% were at or above benchmark 15% were some risk 25% were at risk EOY-40 students were tested 65% scored at or above benchmark 15% scored some risk 20% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2011-2012 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-33 students tested. 10 students low risk 10 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-35 students tested 17 students low risk 14 students some risk 4 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 28 students low risk 7 students some risk 2 students high risk FIRST GRADE BOY-29 students tested 18 low risk 5 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-29 students tested 17 students low risk 6 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-31 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 5 students high risk SECOND GRADE BOY-32 students tested 23 low risk 3 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-38 students tested 21 students low risk 2 students some risk 15 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 20 students low risk 7 students some risk 9 students high risk THIRD GRADE BOY-38 students tested 22 students low risk 6 students some risk 10 students high risk MOY-41 students tested 25 students low risk 10 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-41 students tested 29 students low risk 5 students some risk 7 students low risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-37 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-36 students tested 24 students low risk 3 students some risk 9 students high risk EOY-38 students tested 19 students low risk 10 students some risk 9 students high risk
  5. Lepanto Elementary's average daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  6. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2014-2015 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested First Sound Fluency: 25% scored at risk 11% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark FIRST GRADE: BOY-43 students were tested Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark Phoneme Segmentation Fluency: 9% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 72% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Correct Letter Sound 7% scored at risk 23% scored some risk 70% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Word Read 58% scored some risk 42% scored at or above benchmark SECOND GRADE-26 students were tested Nonsense Word Fluency-Correct Letter Sound 39% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency-Words Read 19% scored at risk 27% scored some risk 54% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Fluency 27% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 54% scored at or above risk DORF-Accuracy 12% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 76% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Retell 24% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark THIRD GRADE: 51 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 18% scored at risk 35% scored some risk 47% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 14% scored at risk 25% scored some risk 61% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 2% scored at risk 8% scored some risk 90% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 22% scored at risk 22% scored some risk 56% scored at or above benchmark FOURTH GRADE 46 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 39% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 20% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 65% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 11% scored at risk 89% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 15% scored at risk 33% scored some risk 52% scored at or above benchmark
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to utilize our data, interventions, and tutoring to improve and motivate our students in their weakest areas, while striving to meet the rigor of PARCC and Common Core State Standards.
Benchmark Lepanto Elementary scored 87.27% for combined population in Literacy. We will continue to enhance our students knowledge base as set forth in the Common Core State Standards.
Intervention: Lepanto Elementary is in its fifth year of transitioning to COMMON CORE STANDARDS and will continue to utilize COMPREHENSIVE LITERACY STRATEGIES to enhance the education of its students in the classroom setting. We will continue to utilize the Put Reading First building blocks for reading.
Scientific Based Research: Mission Statement." Common Core State Standards Initiative. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2013 Donna DiPrima Bickel, et al. "Investigating The Effectiveness Of A Comprehensive Literacy Coaching Program In Schools With High Teacher Mobility." Elementary School Journal 111.1 (2010): 35-62. ERIC. Web. 11 Sept. 2013. The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute Brooks, D. Christopher. “Space Matters: The impact of Formal Learning Environments’ On student Learning. “ British Journal of Educational Technology 42.5 (2011): 719-726. ERIC. Web. 6 Sept. 2013. Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Reserach on Progress Monitoring?" Dorn, LJ.,French C., T. 1998. Apprenticeship in Literacy: Transitions Across Reading and Writing."Stenhouse Publishers, Portland, Maine. Put Reading First The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children To Read: National Reading Panel, Teaching Children to Read: Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for Reading Instruction-Reports of the subgroups. National Institute for Literacy at ED Pubs." Morris, Betty. (2002). “Overcoming Dyslexia.” Shaywitz, Sally E., ( 1996). “Dyslexia” Scientific American, (1996): November.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will continue to purchase materials, supplies, books AND TWO SMARTBOARDS for Courtney Wewers and Debra DuFord enabling classroom teachers the ability to continue a comprehensive literacy program. 1120/66000
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
Mike Kelly, Courtney Wewers, Debra DuFord Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $8,759.00

ACTION BUDGET: $8,759.00
Total Budget: $8,759.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 85% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 25% basic, 76% proficient/advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS 12% basic, 88% proficient/advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% basic; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 89% proficient/advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 33% basic, 67% proficient/advanced We will focus on our greatest areas of needs: Geometry (44%) and Measurement (15%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 73.61% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 23% basic, 39% proficient, and 39% advanced. LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 26% basic, 57% proficient, and 17% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 20% basic, 0% proficient, and 80% advanced. We will focus on our greatest areas of being Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations-Fractions. 2012 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84.49% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: Below Basic 8% Basic 11% 81%% Proficient/Advanced LEP: Below Basic: 40% Basic 0% 60% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 0% Below Basic 12% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 7% Below Basic 7% Basic 85% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 7% Below Basic 10% Basic 82% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history shows a gain of 2.49% from last year. Our weaknesses in MULTIPLE CHOICE were DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY AND MEASUREMENT. OPEN RESPONSE WEAKNESSES were DATA ANALYSIS % PROBABILITY/NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS. Our STRENGTHS included for MULTIPLE CHOICE NUMBERS & OPERATIONS. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE were GEOMETRY. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE 2013-2014 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall, 54% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 34% proficient/advanced NON DIABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 57% proficient/advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 50% below basic, 50% basic ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 46% proficient/advanced NON ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 70% proficient/advanced We will FOCUS on our weak areas: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%), Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra (39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year is as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 50% below basic, 25% basic, 25% proficient, and 0% advanced NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 12% basic, 50% proficient, and 35% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 40% basic, 40% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 12% below basic, 0% basic, 45% proficient, and 24% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% below basic, 0 basic, 44% proficient, and 44% advanced. We will FOCUS on Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: COMBINED: 13.1% Below Basic 21.1% Basic 66% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 14% Below Basic 20% Basic 65% Proficient/Advanced LEP: 0% Below Basic 25% Basic 75% Proficient/Advanced CAUSCASIAN: 19% Below Basic 33% Basic 62% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 20% Below Basic 33% Basic 47% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 9% Below Basic 13% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history showed a 1% gain over 2011 school year. Our STRENGTHS included MEASUREMENT in MULTIPLE CHOICE. STRENGTHS in OPEN RESPONSE were ALGEBRA. Our WEAKNESSES in MULTIPLE CHOICE included GEOMETRY. WEAK area for OPEN RESPONSE was DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY.
  2. In 2014, ITBS scores First Grade-Math Concepts 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark. Both areas are weaknesses for our school. Second Grade-Math Concepts 46.9% scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 31.3% scored at or above benchmark. Math problems are our weakest area. In 2013, ITBS scores FIRST GRADE: MATH CONCEPTS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 20 out of 32 scored below benchmark. MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 15 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 17 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE: MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 25 students scored at or above benchmark; 13 out of 25 students scored below benchmark. STRENGTHS: MATH CONCEPTS: 16 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark; 9 out of 25 scored below benchmark. In 2012, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 53%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011-2012 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN: 25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 100% Below Basic MULTI-ETHNIC: 50%Basic 50% Advanced CAUCASIAN: 16.7% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our weak areas were MATH CONCEPTS & MATH PROBLEMS. SECOND GRADE: According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2011-2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 35% AFRICAN AMERICAN: 66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced MULTI ETHNIC: 33.3% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 33.3 Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 56% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced Our WEAK areas were MATH CONCEPTS and MATH PROBLEMS. Our data showed no strengths. KINDERGARTEN In 2011, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 55.9%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-28.6% HISPANIC-50% CAUCASIAN-60.9% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-55.2% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-100% Our STRENGTHS were numbers properties and operations and problem solving. Our WEAKNESSES were geometry and measurement. FIRST GRADE ITBS 2011 In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 51.5%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-40% CAUCASIAN-63.6% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-44% FIRST GRADE STRENGTH was measurement. WEAKNESSES were numbers and operations, geometry, and problem solving. . SECOND GRADE 2011 In 2011 ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 64.1%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-66.7% HISPANIC-40% CAUCASIAN-66.7% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-60.6% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-50% SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS were numbers and operations, algebraic concepts, geometry, and single step problems. WEAKNESSES were measurement, multiple step problems, data, relationships/trends, and comparing quantities.
  3. Lepanto Elementary's daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  4. EVALUATION This is Lepanto Elementary's fifth year to utilize THE LEARNING INSTITUTE. We will assess the impact on student achievement by analyzing students performance on TLI modules throughout the year. TLI Math Data 2014-2015 Our weak areas in FIRST GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (c) add to: start unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (j) compare: difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (k) compare: bigger unknown; understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6=6, 7=8-1,5+2=2+5, 4+1=5+2; count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral; add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, one and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten; express the length of an object as a whole number of length units; by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps; tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks; organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another; compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangle, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape (a) 2-d shapes. Our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (d) take from: result unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem . (e) take from change unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (h) put together/take apart: added unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (j) put together/take apart: both addends unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (i) compare difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (l) compare smaller unknown; determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g. , by pairing objects or counting them by 2’s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends. (a) even and odd; count within 1000, skip count by 5’s, 10’s 100’s. (b) skip counting; measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. (b) equal shares not same shape. Our weak areas in THIRD GRADE were: solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation for estimation strategies including rounding. (a) addition & subtraction; use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 to 100 (a) round to nearest 10; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. (b) subtract; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 5 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. (A range of algorithms may be used); measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g) , kilograms (k), and liters (l). 6 add subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem. (a) measure and estimate liquid volumes; draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets. (a) picture graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units); relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. (a) find perimeter. Our weak areas in FOURTH GRADE were: multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (a) equal group-unknown products, equal groups-group size unknown, equal groups-number of groups unknown, arrays, area-unknown products, arrays, area-group size unknown, arrays, area-number of groups unknown; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (b) compare-unknown product; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (d) compare- number of groups unknown; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite. (c) prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain formally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way. (b) identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself; fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure. (a) recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, line segments, rays, angles, (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. 2012-2013-As we analyzed our data for 2012-2013, we found the following weaknessess: SECOND GRADE: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-stewp word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positins; determine whether a group of objects has an odd or even number of members; count within 10000, skip county by 5's, 10's, and 100's; measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares; desvribing the shares using the word halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. We will also concentrate on CCSS weaknesses: Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations in Base Ten THIRD GRADE:interpret products of whole numbers; solve two-step word problems using the four operations; represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity;l use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value; properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 usings strategies based on place value and properties of operations; draw a scaled picture-graph adn a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several catergories; solve one- and two- step "how many more" and "how many less" praoblems using information presented in scaled bar graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares; relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons; including finding the perimeter given the side lengths; finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimters. We have adopted CCSS and will work on the following areas also: Operations & Algebraic Thinking, Numbers & Operations-Fractions FOURTH GRADE: interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicaiotn equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicatiogn equation by using draawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100; recognize that a whole numbers is a multiple of each of its factors; determine whether a given whole number in in the range of 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number; determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; fluently add and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers, using the standard algorithm; recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, lines, line segments, rays angles. and perpendicular and parallel lines. We have adopted the CCSS and will also focus on these areas of weak ness: Numbers& Operations in Base Ten and Numbers & Operations-Fractions 2011-2012 EVALUATION As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 , we found the following weaknesses: SECOND GRADE: Operations and Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. THIRD GRADE: Data analysis and probalility; measurement; numbers and operations; geometry; FOURTH GRADE: Geometry; measurement.
  5. TLI Science Data 2014 4th Grade The weak areas in SCIENCE were: generate conclusions based on evidence; evaluate the quality and feasibility of an idea or project; use simple equipment, age appropriate tools, technology, and mathematics in scientific investigations (e.g., balances, hand lenses, microscopes, rulers, thermometers, calculators, computers); apply lab safety rules as they relate to specific science lab activities; classify vertebrates into major subgroups; mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles; identify major parts and functions of the following systems: circulatory; illustrate the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem; collect and interpret measurable empirical evidence in teams and as individuals; evaluate the impact of water pollution.
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Benchmark The 2014 CRT indicated combined population scored 85% for third grade and fourth grade scored 54%. We will continue to move our third and fourth grade students to the proficient or advanced level on the Math portion of the upcoming PARRC assessment. We have adopted Common Core Standards at Lepanto Elementary. Our scores on the ACTAAP were as follows: THIRD GRADE: Combined Population 85% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra (67%), Measurement (56%), Data/Probability (62%), Numbers/Operations (72%)OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (53%), Algebra (68%), Data/Probability (50%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%); OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry (1%), Measurement (15%). FOURTH GRADE Combined Population 54% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS IN MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers/Operations (73%), Algebra (56%), Data/Probability (58%); OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement (55%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Intervention: Computer Assisted Instruction
Scientific Based Research: Ed Thoughts: What We Know About Mathematics Teaching and Learning. p. 61-71, McRel, edited by John Sutton and Alice Krueger, Aurora, CO, 2002. PRWeb, "Reserach Study Shows Stunning Gains for Elemenrtary Student with Person's enVisionMATH Program" April, 2010.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will purchase 8 IPADS and 1 MAC Computer for use by students for research.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Mike Kelly Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $1,182.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,182.00
Total Budget: $1,182.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $14724
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2013-2014 As we analyzed our data for the 2013-2014 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in Second Grade were: ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text; recount stories including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral; describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song; describe the overall structure of a story, including describing the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action; describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area; know and use various text features to locate key information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. Weak areas for THIRD GRADE were: ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language; refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters; ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; use text features and search tools to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently; distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use determiners; produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts; capitalize dates and names of people; use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series; use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Weak areas for FOURTH GRADE were: refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the meaning fo words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text; explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text; explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening; demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings; explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences; produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. Our weak areas in Third Grade were: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how (20%), know and use various text features (23%), describe how reasons support specific points the authors makes in a text (35%), identify the main topic of a multi paragraph text (44%), recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures (45%). Our weak areas in Fourth Grade were: Reading: refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a topic (19%), determine the main idea of a text; recount key details (31%), describe the relationship between a series of historical events (38%), ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text (38%), describe characters in a story (36%). Writing: demonstrate common of conventions of standard English grammar and usage (7%) demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization and punctuation (33%), produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentences (46%), use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series (47%). THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2012-2013 As we analyzed our data for the 2012-2013 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: article details;inference; main idea; literary element analysis; sequencing; vocabulary; literary devices; analysis; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area, know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. THIRD GRADE: article details; inference; literary devices; analysis; use text features and search tools to locate informatin relevant to a given topic efficiently; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; use abstract nouns; irregular nouns; subordinating conjunctions; commas; quotation marks. FOURTH GRADE: article details; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; main idea; analysis; explain how an author uses reasons for reading and evidence to support particular points in a text; fragments; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar adn usage when writing or speaking; metaphor; adage/proverb; demonstratives; adverbs; simple sentences. 2011-2012 As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our greatest need in SECOND GRADE were main topic of a multiparagraph text, identifying the main purpose of a text and know and use various text features. In SECOND GRADE WRITING demonstrate command of the conventions of standards, use commas in dates to separate single words and capitalize dates and names of people. THIRD GRADE'S weakest areas were in describe the relationship between a series, recount stories and including fables and folktales. In THIRD GRADE WRITING the data showed demonstrate command of conventions, and use knowledge of language and its conventions. . FOURTH GRADE data showed a need in the overall structure, describe in depth a character, setting or events, and determine the main idea of a text. In FOURTH GRADE WRITING the areas were produce simple, compound, and complex sentences and demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English. We will focus on these areas in both classroom instruction and intervention time.
  2. 2013-2014 ACTAAP Data According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, the data is as follows: COMBINED POPULATION: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 13% basic, 50% proficient, 25% advanced; NON DISABLED STUDENTS: 6% basic, 53% proficient, and 41% advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% proficient; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 17% below basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced. As we analyzed our data, we will strive to improve the following weak areas: CONTENT (58%) MULTIPLE CHOICE WRITING (54%) OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGES (45%) CONTENT (25%) PRACTICAL (41%) Our STRENGTHS were MULTIPLE CHOICE-LITERARY PASSAGE 62% PRACTICAL PASSAGE 71%; OPEN RESPONSE-WRITING CONTENT 61%, WRITING STYLE 63%, SENTENCE FORMATION 70%, USAGE 76%, MECHANICS 73%. 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% proficient. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, and 0% advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANAGED: 9% scored below basic, 30% scored basic, 26% scored proficient, and 36% scored advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 10% below basic, 0% basic, 30% proficient, and 60% advanced. As we analyzed our data we will strive to improve in the following weak areas: In THIRD GRADE we will work on Literary (50%), Content (50), Practical (38%) all being Open Response items. Our STRENGTHS were Multiple Choice: Content (63%), Practical (63%), Writing (63%), Content (65%), Style (65%), Sentence Formation (70%), Usage (84%), Mechanics (78%)/ 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES-0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-11% Below basic 5% Basic 84% Proficient/Advanced GENDER GAP FEMALE-7% Below Basic 7% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE 21% Below Basic 0% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced ETHNICITY-HISPANIC-40% Below Basic 0% Basic 60% Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN-6% Below Basic 6% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced Our Strengths included Multiple Choice Writing and Content Passage. Our strengths in Open Response were Reading Content and Writing Sentence Formation. We scored above State Average in all areas. We will focus on our weak areas being Multiple Choice Literacy Passage and Practical Passage. Our weak areas in Open Response were Reading Practical and Writing Content. 2013-2014 ACTAAP DATA According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the sub populations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 17% proficient, and 17% advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 39% proficient, 18% advanced; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 42% proficient, and 4% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 20% proficient, and 50% advanced. Our weak areas included WRITING MULTIPLE CHOICE (63%) and OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGE (35%). Our STRENGTHS were in the area of LITERARY PASSAGE (64%), CONTENT PASSAGE (71%) PRACTICAL (66%); open response-CONTENT PASSAGE (78%) PRACTICAL PASSAGE (63%), WRITING CONTENT (71%) STYLE (71%), SENTENCE FORMATION (80%) USAGE (89%) MECHANICS (80%) 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 90% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% advanced NON-DIABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% Advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 6% below basic, 3% basic, 42% proficient, and 48% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 11% basic, 33% proficient, and 56% advanced. In Fourth Grade, we will work on Literary (38%)and Practical (50%) in Open Response items. Our only weak area in Multiple Choice for Fourth Grade was Writing (50%). Our STRENGTHS included the following: all strands of Writing: Content(74%),Style (74%), Sentence Formation (88%), Usage (98%), Mechanics (86%); MULTIPLE CHOICE: Literary (63%), Content (75%), Practical (75%). OPEN RESPONSE: Content (63%). 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 87% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-3.1% Below Basic 11.1% Basic 86% Proficient/Advanced MALE-7.1% Below Basic 7.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE-0% Below Basic 13.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced WHITE-4.1% Below Basic 8.1% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced Our STRENGTHS in Multiple Choice include Writing-Multiple Choice. Open Response Reading Practical Passage, Writing Sentence Formation, Writing Usage, Writing Mechanics. Our WEAKEST areas in multiple choice was Reading Practical Passage. In Open Response Writing Style Domain, Writing Content Domain and Reading Content Domain.
  3. 2013-2014 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2014, FIRST GRADE: COMBINED POPULATION VOCABULARY Out of 31 students tested, 12 scored above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-out of 31 students tested, 15 scored above benchmark, SPELLING-31 students tested, 14 scored above benchmark. Weak areas being in VOCABULARY. SECOND GRADE ITBS DATA 2013-2014 COMBINED POPULATION-VOCABULARY 31.3% above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-43.8% above benchmark, SPELLING-43.7% above benchmark. Our weakest area being in VOCABULARY. 2012-2013 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2013, FIRST GRADE: VOCABULARY 26 out of 32 students scored below basic. 6 out of 32 students scored at or above benchmark. SPELLING: 18 out of 32 scored below basic. 14 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION: 17 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. 15 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE VOCABULARY: 14 out of 25 scored below benchmark. 11 out of 25 scored 44% at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark. 10 out of 25 scored below benchmark. Our STRENGTHS were in COMPREHENSION for both grades with 17 out of 32 scoring at or above benchmark in FIRST GRADE and 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark in SECOND GRADE. SECOND GRADE had a STRENGTH in SPELLING with 13 our of 25 scored at or above benchmark. Our WEAKNESSESS were in VOCABULARY with 26 out of 32 scoring below benchmark and SPELLING with 18 out of 32 scored below benchmark. According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2011-2012, out of 31 students tested, First Grade scored 41% in Reading and 47% in Language. When analyzing the subpopulations, they were as follows: African American-25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient HISPANIC-100% Below Basic CAUCASIAN-16.7% Below Basic 33.3% in Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED- 18.5 Below Basic 37% Basic 44% Proficient/Advanced SECOND GRADE 2011-2012 Overall, 36 students tested-38% Reading 40% Language. When the sub populations were analyzed the results are the following: African American-66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced Hispanic-50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Causasion-41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 41.6 Proficient/Advanced Economically Disadvantaged-46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced
  4. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2013-2014 KINDERGARTEN: EOY-46 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY-45 students were tested 44% scored at or above benchmark 18% scored some risk 38% scored at risk FIRST GRADE EOY-31 students were tested 32% scored at risk 10% scored some risk 58% scored at or above benchmark BOY:34 students were tested 64% scored at or above benchmark 21% scored some risk 15% scored at risk SECOND GRADE EOY-32 students were tested 6% scored at risk 16% scored some risk 78% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 16 students were tested 88% scored at or above benchmark 6% scored some risk 6% scored at risk THIRD GRADE EOY-24 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 15 students were tested 47% scored at or above benchmark 20% scored some risk 33% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2012-2013 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested 50%% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 33% scored low risk EOY-36 students were tested 81% scored low risk 11% scored some risk 8% scored at risk FIRST GRADE: BOY-36 students were tested 33% scored well below benchmark 19% scored below benchmark 48% scored at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 53 scored low risk 38 scored some risk 9% scored at risk SECOND GRADE: BOY-25 students were tested 84% students scored at or above benchmark 8% scored some risk 8% scored at risk EOY-24 students were tested 83% scored low risk 17% scored some risk 0 scored at risk THIRD GRADE: BOY- 36 students were tested 46% were well below benchmark 3% were below benchmark 51% were at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 62% scored low risk 3% scored some risk 46% scored at risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-40 students were tested 60% were at or above benchmark 15% were some risk 25% were at risk EOY-40 students were tested 65% scored at or above benchmark 15% scored some risk 20% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2011-2012 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-33 students tested. 10 students low risk 10 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-35 students tested 17 students low risk 14 students some risk 4 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 28 students low risk 7 students some risk 2 students high risk FIRST GRADE BOY-29 students tested 18 low risk 5 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-29 students tested 17 students low risk 6 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-31 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 5 students high risk SECOND GRADE BOY-32 students tested 23 low risk 3 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-38 students tested 21 students low risk 2 students some risk 15 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 20 students low risk 7 students some risk 9 students high risk THIRD GRADE BOY-38 students tested 22 students low risk 6 students some risk 10 students high risk MOY-41 students tested 25 students low risk 10 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-41 students tested 29 students low risk 5 students some risk 7 students low risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-37 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-36 students tested 24 students low risk 3 students some risk 9 students high risk EOY-38 students tested 19 students low risk 10 students some risk 9 students high risk
  5. Lepanto Elementary's average daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  6. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2014-2015 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested First Sound Fluency: 25% scored at risk 11% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark FIRST GRADE: BOY-43 students were tested Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark Phoneme Segmentation Fluency: 9% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 72% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Correct Letter Sound 7% scored at risk 23% scored some risk 70% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Word Read 58% scored some risk 42% scored at or above benchmark SECOND GRADE-26 students were tested Nonsense Word Fluency-Correct Letter Sound 39% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency-Words Read 19% scored at risk 27% scored some risk 54% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Fluency 27% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 54% scored at or above risk DORF-Accuracy 12% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 76% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Retell 24% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark THIRD GRADE: 51 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 18% scored at risk 35% scored some risk 47% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 14% scored at risk 25% scored some risk 61% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 2% scored at risk 8% scored some risk 90% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 22% scored at risk 22% scored some risk 56% scored at or above benchmark FOURTH GRADE 46 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 39% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 20% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 65% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 11% scored at risk 89% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 15% scored at risk 33% scored some risk 52% scored at or above benchmark
Goal All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
Benchmark All kindergarten students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten prepared for math and reading readiness.
Intervention: Two ABC preschool classrooms will serve the Lepanto campus providing transition from home to school for low income families.
Scientific Based Research: "The Effects of Preschool Experiences on Academic Achievement of First Graders Kohart, Rebecca; Nickell, Kathryn June 1994, Starting at 3, a project of Education Law Center, supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, 2005 Education Law Center Hustedt, Jason T., et al. "The effects of the Arkansas Better Chance Program on young children’s school readiness." National Institute for Early Education Research (2007)
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will continue to fund the NSLA Pre-K classroom due to the large number of children who couldn't get into the regular ABC Pre-K program. We felt this was a good use of our monies. 1 classified teacher and 1 parapro hired. PD/Materials & Supplies used to set classroom up. They are under Department of Human Services and Arkansas Minimun Licensure.
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Professional Development
Connie Gill, June Franks Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Central Office
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $10,695.00

ACTION BUDGET: $10,695.00
Total Budget: $10,695.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 85% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 25% basic, 76% proficient/advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS 12% basic, 88% proficient/advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% basic; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 89% proficient/advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 33% basic, 67% proficient/advanced We will focus on our greatest areas of needs: Geometry (44%) and Measurement (15%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 73.61% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 23% basic, 39% proficient, and 39% advanced. LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 26% basic, 57% proficient, and 17% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 20% basic, 0% proficient, and 80% advanced. We will focus on our greatest areas of being Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations-Fractions. 2012 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84.49% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: Below Basic 8% Basic 11% 81%% Proficient/Advanced LEP: Below Basic: 40% Basic 0% 60% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 0% Below Basic 12% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 7% Below Basic 7% Basic 85% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 7% Below Basic 10% Basic 82% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history shows a gain of 2.49% from last year. Our weaknesses in MULTIPLE CHOICE were DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY AND MEASUREMENT. OPEN RESPONSE WEAKNESSES were DATA ANALYSIS % PROBABILITY/NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS. Our STRENGTHS included for MULTIPLE CHOICE NUMBERS & OPERATIONS. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE were GEOMETRY. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE 2013-2014 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall, 54% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 34% proficient/advanced NON DIABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 57% proficient/advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 50% below basic, 50% basic ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 46% proficient/advanced NON ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 70% proficient/advanced We will FOCUS on our weak areas: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%), Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra (39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year is as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 50% below basic, 25% basic, 25% proficient, and 0% advanced NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 12% basic, 50% proficient, and 35% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 40% basic, 40% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 12% below basic, 0% basic, 45% proficient, and 24% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% below basic, 0 basic, 44% proficient, and 44% advanced. We will FOCUS on Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: COMBINED: 13.1% Below Basic 21.1% Basic 66% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 14% Below Basic 20% Basic 65% Proficient/Advanced LEP: 0% Below Basic 25% Basic 75% Proficient/Advanced CAUSCASIAN: 19% Below Basic 33% Basic 62% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 20% Below Basic 33% Basic 47% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 9% Below Basic 13% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history showed a 1% gain over 2011 school year. Our STRENGTHS included MEASUREMENT in MULTIPLE CHOICE. STRENGTHS in OPEN RESPONSE were ALGEBRA. Our WEAKNESSES in MULTIPLE CHOICE included GEOMETRY. WEAK area for OPEN RESPONSE was DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY.
  2. In 2014, ITBS scores First Grade-Math Concepts 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark. Both areas are weaknesses for our school. Second Grade-Math Concepts 46.9% scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 31.3% scored at or above benchmark. Math problems are our weakest area. In 2013, ITBS scores FIRST GRADE: MATH CONCEPTS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 20 out of 32 scored below benchmark. MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 15 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 17 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE: MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 25 students scored at or above benchmark; 13 out of 25 students scored below benchmark. STRENGTHS: MATH CONCEPTS: 16 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark; 9 out of 25 scored below benchmark. In 2012, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 53%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011-2012 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN: 25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 100% Below Basic MULTI-ETHNIC: 50%Basic 50% Advanced CAUCASIAN: 16.7% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our weak areas were MATH CONCEPTS & MATH PROBLEMS. SECOND GRADE: According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2011-2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 35% AFRICAN AMERICAN: 66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced MULTI ETHNIC: 33.3% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 33.3 Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 56% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced Our WEAK areas were MATH CONCEPTS and MATH PROBLEMS. Our data showed no strengths. KINDERGARTEN In 2011, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 55.9%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-28.6% HISPANIC-50% CAUCASIAN-60.9% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-55.2% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-100% Our STRENGTHS were numbers properties and operations and problem solving. Our WEAKNESSES were geometry and measurement. FIRST GRADE ITBS 2011 In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 51.5%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-40% CAUCASIAN-63.6% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-44% FIRST GRADE STRENGTH was measurement. WEAKNESSES were numbers and operations, geometry, and problem solving. . SECOND GRADE 2011 In 2011 ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 64.1%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-66.7% HISPANIC-40% CAUCASIAN-66.7% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-60.6% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-50% SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS were numbers and operations, algebraic concepts, geometry, and single step problems. WEAKNESSES were measurement, multiple step problems, data, relationships/trends, and comparing quantities.
  3. Lepanto Elementary's daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  4. EVALUATION This is Lepanto Elementary's fifth year to utilize THE LEARNING INSTITUTE. We will assess the impact on student achievement by analyzing students performance on TLI modules throughout the year. TLI Math Data 2014-2015 Our weak areas in FIRST GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (c) add to: start unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (j) compare: difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (k) compare: bigger unknown; understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6=6, 7=8-1,5+2=2+5, 4+1=5+2; count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral; add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, one and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten; express the length of an object as a whole number of length units; by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps; tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks; organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another; compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangle, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape (a) 2-d shapes. Our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (d) take from: result unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem . (e) take from change unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (h) put together/take apart: added unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (j) put together/take apart: both addends unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (i) compare difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (l) compare smaller unknown; determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g. , by pairing objects or counting them by 2’s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends. (a) even and odd; count within 1000, skip count by 5’s, 10’s 100’s. (b) skip counting; measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. (b) equal shares not same shape. Our weak areas in THIRD GRADE were: solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation for estimation strategies including rounding. (a) addition & subtraction; use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 to 100 (a) round to nearest 10; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. (b) subtract; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 5 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. (A range of algorithms may be used); measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g) , kilograms (k), and liters (l). 6 add subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem. (a) measure and estimate liquid volumes; draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets. (a) picture graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units); relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. (a) find perimeter. Our weak areas in FOURTH GRADE were: multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (a) equal group-unknown products, equal groups-group size unknown, equal groups-number of groups unknown, arrays, area-unknown products, arrays, area-group size unknown, arrays, area-number of groups unknown; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (b) compare-unknown product; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (d) compare- number of groups unknown; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite. (c) prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain formally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way. (b) identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself; fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure. (a) recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, line segments, rays, angles, (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. 2012-2013-As we analyzed our data for 2012-2013, we found the following weaknessess: SECOND GRADE: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-stewp word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positins; determine whether a group of objects has an odd or even number of members; count within 10000, skip county by 5's, 10's, and 100's; measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares; desvribing the shares using the word halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. We will also concentrate on CCSS weaknesses: Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations in Base Ten THIRD GRADE:interpret products of whole numbers; solve two-step word problems using the four operations; represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity;l use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value; properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 usings strategies based on place value and properties of operations; draw a scaled picture-graph adn a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several catergories; solve one- and two- step "how many more" and "how many less" praoblems using information presented in scaled bar graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares; relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons; including finding the perimeter given the side lengths; finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimters. We have adopted CCSS and will work on the following areas also: Operations & Algebraic Thinking, Numbers & Operations-Fractions FOURTH GRADE: interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicaiotn equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicatiogn equation by using draawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100; recognize that a whole numbers is a multiple of each of its factors; determine whether a given whole number in in the range of 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number; determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; fluently add and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers, using the standard algorithm; recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, lines, line segments, rays angles. and perpendicular and parallel lines. We have adopted the CCSS and will also focus on these areas of weak ness: Numbers& Operations in Base Ten and Numbers & Operations-Fractions 2011-2012 EVALUATION As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 , we found the following weaknesses: SECOND GRADE: Operations and Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. THIRD GRADE: Data analysis and probalility; measurement; numbers and operations; geometry; FOURTH GRADE: Geometry; measurement.
  5. TLI Science Data 2014 4th Grade The weak areas in SCIENCE were: generate conclusions based on evidence; evaluate the quality and feasibility of an idea or project; use simple equipment, age appropriate tools, technology, and mathematics in scientific investigations (e.g., balances, hand lenses, microscopes, rulers, thermometers, calculators, computers); apply lab safety rules as they relate to specific science lab activities; classify vertebrates into major subgroups; mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles; identify major parts and functions of the following systems: circulatory; illustrate the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem; collect and interpret measurable empirical evidence in teams and as individuals; evaluate the impact of water pollution.
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Benchmark The 2014 CRT indicated combined population scored 85% for third grade and fourth grade scored 54%. We will continue to move our third and fourth grade students to the proficient or advanced level on the Math portion of the upcoming PARRC assessment. We have adopted Common Core Standards at Lepanto Elementary. Our scores on the ACTAAP were as follows: THIRD GRADE: Combined Population 85% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra (67%), Measurement (56%), Data/Probability (62%), Numbers/Operations (72%)OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (53%), Algebra (68%), Data/Probability (50%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%); OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry (1%), Measurement (15%). FOURTH GRADE Combined Population 54% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS IN MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers/Operations (73%), Algebra (56%), Data/Probability (58%); OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement (55%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Intervention: Prescriptive Diagnostic Intervention
Scientific Based Research: An Action Based Research Study on How Using Manipulatives will Increase Students' Achievement in Mathematics. Published by Crystal Allen in 2007. Educational Leadership. February (2005) Volume 62 Number 5 How Schools Improve p. 81-83. Research Matters/How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction Nancy Safer adn Steve Fleischman. ED Thoughts: What We Know About Mathematics Teaching and Learning. p. 44-45. McRel. Edited by John Sutton and Krueger, Aurora, CO., (2002). McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G., Understanding by Design, ASCD, Alexandria, VA, p. 160, (1998).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Marilyn Rece HIGHLY QUALIFIED PARAPROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISSTANT will assist in the intervention process as tutors for grades K-4. FTE 1.00 1120 NSLA Salary
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Special Education
Marilyn Rece Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $2,955.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,955.00
Total Budget: $2,955.00
Intervention: Lepanto Elementary will continue to offer after school tutoring to students who qualify by use of District Generated Tests.
Scientific Based Research: SCIENTIFIC BASED RESEARCH: Reducing Dropout Rates through Expanded Learning Opportunities Laura Harris Policy Analyst October 28, 2009. "The Effects of an After-School Tutoring Program on the Academic Performance of At-Risk Students and Students with LD. F. Hock, Michael A.Pulvers, Kim D.Deshley, Donald B.Schumaker, Jean. Remedial & Special Edcuation; May/Jun 2001, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p172, 15p, 4 graphs.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
To increase Math Fluency, 3 tutors will be employed to provide additional help for students identified by teachers as need improvement. Tutors will assist with grades 1st-4th grades for 25 weeks. 3 tutors will work 2 hours per day for 4 days a week for a total of 200 hours over the duration of the year with a rate of pay at $8.26 per hour for a total cost of $6030.00 for the year. $1074.00 Benefits
Anthony Dowdy Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
 
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $1,074.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,074.00
Total Budget: $1,074.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $59605
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2013-2014 As we analyzed our data for the 2013-2014 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in Second Grade were: ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text; recount stories including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral; describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song; describe the overall structure of a story, including describing the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action; describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area; know and use various text features to locate key information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. Weak areas for THIRD GRADE were: ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language; refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters; ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; use text features and search tools to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently; distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use determiners; produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts; capitalize dates and names of people; use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series; use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Weak areas for FOURTH GRADE were: refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the meaning fo words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text; explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text; explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening; demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings; explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences; produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. Our weak areas in Third Grade were: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how (20%), know and use various text features (23%), describe how reasons support specific points the authors makes in a text (35%), identify the main topic of a multi paragraph text (44%), recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures (45%). Our weak areas in Fourth Grade were: Reading: refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a topic (19%), determine the main idea of a text; recount key details (31%), describe the relationship between a series of historical events (38%), ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text (38%), describe characters in a story (36%). Writing: demonstrate common of conventions of standard English grammar and usage (7%) demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization and punctuation (33%), produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentences (46%), use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series (47%). THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2012-2013 As we analyzed our data for the 2012-2013 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: article details;inference; main idea; literary element analysis; sequencing; vocabulary; literary devices; analysis; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area, know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. THIRD GRADE: article details; inference; literary devices; analysis; use text features and search tools to locate informatin relevant to a given topic efficiently; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; use abstract nouns; irregular nouns; subordinating conjunctions; commas; quotation marks. FOURTH GRADE: article details; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; main idea; analysis; explain how an author uses reasons for reading and evidence to support particular points in a text; fragments; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar adn usage when writing or speaking; metaphor; adage/proverb; demonstratives; adverbs; simple sentences. 2011-2012 As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our greatest need in SECOND GRADE were main topic of a multiparagraph text, identifying the main purpose of a text and know and use various text features. In SECOND GRADE WRITING demonstrate command of the conventions of standards, use commas in dates to separate single words and capitalize dates and names of people. THIRD GRADE'S weakest areas were in describe the relationship between a series, recount stories and including fables and folktales. In THIRD GRADE WRITING the data showed demonstrate command of conventions, and use knowledge of language and its conventions. . FOURTH GRADE data showed a need in the overall structure, describe in depth a character, setting or events, and determine the main idea of a text. In FOURTH GRADE WRITING the areas were produce simple, compound, and complex sentences and demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English. We will focus on these areas in both classroom instruction and intervention time.
  2. 2013-2014 ACTAAP Data According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, the data is as follows: COMBINED POPULATION: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 13% basic, 50% proficient, 25% advanced; NON DISABLED STUDENTS: 6% basic, 53% proficient, and 41% advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% proficient; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 17% below basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced. As we analyzed our data, we will strive to improve the following weak areas: CONTENT (58%) MULTIPLE CHOICE WRITING (54%) OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGES (45%) CONTENT (25%) PRACTICAL (41%) Our STRENGTHS were MULTIPLE CHOICE-LITERARY PASSAGE 62% PRACTICAL PASSAGE 71%; OPEN RESPONSE-WRITING CONTENT 61%, WRITING STYLE 63%, SENTENCE FORMATION 70%, USAGE 76%, MECHANICS 73%. 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% proficient. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, and 0% advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANAGED: 9% scored below basic, 30% scored basic, 26% scored proficient, and 36% scored advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 10% below basic, 0% basic, 30% proficient, and 60% advanced. As we analyzed our data we will strive to improve in the following weak areas: In THIRD GRADE we will work on Literary (50%), Content (50), Practical (38%) all being Open Response items. Our STRENGTHS were Multiple Choice: Content (63%), Practical (63%), Writing (63%), Content (65%), Style (65%), Sentence Formation (70%), Usage (84%), Mechanics (78%)/ 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES-0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-11% Below basic 5% Basic 84% Proficient/Advanced GENDER GAP FEMALE-7% Below Basic 7% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE 21% Below Basic 0% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced ETHNICITY-HISPANIC-40% Below Basic 0% Basic 60% Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN-6% Below Basic 6% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced Our Strengths included Multiple Choice Writing and Content Passage. Our strengths in Open Response were Reading Content and Writing Sentence Formation. We scored above State Average in all areas. We will focus on our weak areas being Multiple Choice Literacy Passage and Practical Passage. Our weak areas in Open Response were Reading Practical and Writing Content. 2013-2014 ACTAAP DATA According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the sub populations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 17% proficient, and 17% advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 39% proficient, 18% advanced; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 42% proficient, and 4% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 20% proficient, and 50% advanced. Our weak areas included WRITING MULTIPLE CHOICE (63%) and OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGE (35%). Our STRENGTHS were in the area of LITERARY PASSAGE (64%), CONTENT PASSAGE (71%) PRACTICAL (66%); open response-CONTENT PASSAGE (78%) PRACTICAL PASSAGE (63%), WRITING CONTENT (71%) STYLE (71%), SENTENCE FORMATION (80%) USAGE (89%) MECHANICS (80%) 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 90% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% advanced NON-DIABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% Advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 6% below basic, 3% basic, 42% proficient, and 48% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 11% basic, 33% proficient, and 56% advanced. In Fourth Grade, we will work on Literary (38%)and Practical (50%) in Open Response items. Our only weak area in Multiple Choice for Fourth Grade was Writing (50%). Our STRENGTHS included the following: all strands of Writing: Content(74%),Style (74%), Sentence Formation (88%), Usage (98%), Mechanics (86%); MULTIPLE CHOICE: Literary (63%), Content (75%), Practical (75%). OPEN RESPONSE: Content (63%). 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 87% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-3.1% Below Basic 11.1% Basic 86% Proficient/Advanced MALE-7.1% Below Basic 7.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE-0% Below Basic 13.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced WHITE-4.1% Below Basic 8.1% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced Our STRENGTHS in Multiple Choice include Writing-Multiple Choice. Open Response Reading Practical Passage, Writing Sentence Formation, Writing Usage, Writing Mechanics. Our WEAKEST areas in multiple choice was Reading Practical Passage. In Open Response Writing Style Domain, Writing Content Domain and Reading Content Domain.
  3. 2013-2014 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2014, FIRST GRADE: COMBINED POPULATION VOCABULARY Out of 31 students tested, 12 scored above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-out of 31 students tested, 15 scored above benchmark, SPELLING-31 students tested, 14 scored above benchmark. Weak areas being in VOCABULARY. SECOND GRADE ITBS DATA 2013-2014 COMBINED POPULATION-VOCABULARY 31.3% above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-43.8% above benchmark, SPELLING-43.7% above benchmark. Our weakest area being in VOCABULARY. 2012-2013 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2013, FIRST GRADE: VOCABULARY 26 out of 32 students scored below basic. 6 out of 32 students scored at or above benchmark. SPELLING: 18 out of 32 scored below basic. 14 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION: 17 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. 15 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE VOCABULARY: 14 out of 25 scored below benchmark. 11 out of 25 scored 44% at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark. 10 out of 25 scored below benchmark. Our STRENGTHS were in COMPREHENSION for both grades with 17 out of 32 scoring at or above benchmark in FIRST GRADE and 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark in SECOND GRADE. SECOND GRADE had a STRENGTH in SPELLING with 13 our of 25 scored at or above benchmark. Our WEAKNESSESS were in VOCABULARY with 26 out of 32 scoring below benchmark and SPELLING with 18 out of 32 scored below benchmark. According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2011-2012, out of 31 students tested, First Grade scored 41% in Reading and 47% in Language. When analyzing the subpopulations, they were as follows: African American-25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient HISPANIC-100% Below Basic CAUCASIAN-16.7% Below Basic 33.3% in Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED- 18.5 Below Basic 37% Basic 44% Proficient/Advanced SECOND GRADE 2011-2012 Overall, 36 students tested-38% Reading 40% Language. When the sub populations were analyzed the results are the following: African American-66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced Hispanic-50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Causasion-41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 41.6 Proficient/Advanced Economically Disadvantaged-46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced
  4. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2013-2014 KINDERGARTEN: EOY-46 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY-45 students were tested 44% scored at or above benchmark 18% scored some risk 38% scored at risk FIRST GRADE EOY-31 students were tested 32% scored at risk 10% scored some risk 58% scored at or above benchmark BOY:34 students were tested 64% scored at or above benchmark 21% scored some risk 15% scored at risk SECOND GRADE EOY-32 students were tested 6% scored at risk 16% scored some risk 78% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 16 students were tested 88% scored at or above benchmark 6% scored some risk 6% scored at risk THIRD GRADE EOY-24 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 15 students were tested 47% scored at or above benchmark 20% scored some risk 33% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2012-2013 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested 50%% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 33% scored low risk EOY-36 students were tested 81% scored low risk 11% scored some risk 8% scored at risk FIRST GRADE: BOY-36 students were tested 33% scored well below benchmark 19% scored below benchmark 48% scored at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 53 scored low risk 38 scored some risk 9% scored at risk SECOND GRADE: BOY-25 students were tested 84% students scored at or above benchmark 8% scored some risk 8% scored at risk EOY-24 students were tested 83% scored low risk 17% scored some risk 0 scored at risk THIRD GRADE: BOY- 36 students were tested 46% were well below benchmark 3% were below benchmark 51% were at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 62% scored low risk 3% scored some risk 46% scored at risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-40 students were tested 60% were at or above benchmark 15% were some risk 25% were at risk EOY-40 students were tested 65% scored at or above benchmark 15% scored some risk 20% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2011-2012 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-33 students tested. 10 students low risk 10 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-35 students tested 17 students low risk 14 students some risk 4 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 28 students low risk 7 students some risk 2 students high risk FIRST GRADE BOY-29 students tested 18 low risk 5 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-29 students tested 17 students low risk 6 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-31 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 5 students high risk SECOND GRADE BOY-32 students tested 23 low risk 3 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-38 students tested 21 students low risk 2 students some risk 15 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 20 students low risk 7 students some risk 9 students high risk THIRD GRADE BOY-38 students tested 22 students low risk 6 students some risk 10 students high risk MOY-41 students tested 25 students low risk 10 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-41 students tested 29 students low risk 5 students some risk 7 students low risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-37 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-36 students tested 24 students low risk 3 students some risk 9 students high risk EOY-38 students tested 19 students low risk 10 students some risk 9 students high risk
  5. Lepanto Elementary's average daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  6. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2014-2015 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested First Sound Fluency: 25% scored at risk 11% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark FIRST GRADE: BOY-43 students were tested Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark Phoneme Segmentation Fluency: 9% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 72% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Correct Letter Sound 7% scored at risk 23% scored some risk 70% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Word Read 58% scored some risk 42% scored at or above benchmark SECOND GRADE-26 students were tested Nonsense Word Fluency-Correct Letter Sound 39% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency-Words Read 19% scored at risk 27% scored some risk 54% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Fluency 27% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 54% scored at or above risk DORF-Accuracy 12% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 76% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Retell 24% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark THIRD GRADE: 51 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 18% scored at risk 35% scored some risk 47% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 14% scored at risk 25% scored some risk 61% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 2% scored at risk 8% scored some risk 90% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 22% scored at risk 22% scored some risk 56% scored at or above benchmark FOURTH GRADE 46 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 39% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 20% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 65% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 11% scored at risk 89% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 15% scored at risk 33% scored some risk 52% scored at or above benchmark
Goal All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
Benchmark All kindergarten students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten prepared for math and reading readiness.
Intervention: Two ABC preschool classrooms will serve the Lepanto campus providing transition from home to school for low income families.
Scientific Based Research: "The Effects of Preschool Experiences on Academic Achievement of First Graders Kohart, Rebecca; Nickell, Kathryn June 1994, Starting at 3, a project of Education Law Center, supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, 2005 Education Law Center Hustedt, Jason T., et al. "The effects of the Arkansas Better Chance Program on young children’s school readiness." National Institute for Early Education Research (2007)
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will continue to fund the NSLA Pre-K classroom due to the large number of children who couldn't get into the regular ABC Pre-K program. We felt this was a good use of our monies. 1 classified teacher and 1 parapro hired. PD/Materials & Supplies used to set classroom up. They are under Department of Human Services and Arkansas Minimun Licensure.
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Professional Development
Connie Gill, June Franks Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Central Office
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $41,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $41,000.00
Total Budget: $41,000.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 85% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 25% basic, 76% proficient/advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS 12% basic, 88% proficient/advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% basic; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 89% proficient/advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 33% basic, 67% proficient/advanced We will focus on our greatest areas of needs: Geometry (44%) and Measurement (15%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 73.61% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 23% basic, 39% proficient, and 39% advanced. LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 26% basic, 57% proficient, and 17% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 20% basic, 0% proficient, and 80% advanced. We will focus on our greatest areas of being Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations-Fractions. 2012 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84.49% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: Below Basic 8% Basic 11% 81%% Proficient/Advanced LEP: Below Basic: 40% Basic 0% 60% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 0% Below Basic 12% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 7% Below Basic 7% Basic 85% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 7% Below Basic 10% Basic 82% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history shows a gain of 2.49% from last year. Our weaknesses in MULTIPLE CHOICE were DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY AND MEASUREMENT. OPEN RESPONSE WEAKNESSES were DATA ANALYSIS % PROBABILITY/NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS. Our STRENGTHS included for MULTIPLE CHOICE NUMBERS & OPERATIONS. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE were GEOMETRY. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE 2013-2014 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall, 54% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 34% proficient/advanced NON DIABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 57% proficient/advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 50% below basic, 50% basic ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 46% proficient/advanced NON ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 70% proficient/advanced We will FOCUS on our weak areas: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%), Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra (39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year is as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 50% below basic, 25% basic, 25% proficient, and 0% advanced NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 12% basic, 50% proficient, and 35% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 40% basic, 40% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 12% below basic, 0% basic, 45% proficient, and 24% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% below basic, 0 basic, 44% proficient, and 44% advanced. We will FOCUS on Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: COMBINED: 13.1% Below Basic 21.1% Basic 66% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 14% Below Basic 20% Basic 65% Proficient/Advanced LEP: 0% Below Basic 25% Basic 75% Proficient/Advanced CAUSCASIAN: 19% Below Basic 33% Basic 62% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 20% Below Basic 33% Basic 47% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 9% Below Basic 13% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history showed a 1% gain over 2011 school year. Our STRENGTHS included MEASUREMENT in MULTIPLE CHOICE. STRENGTHS in OPEN RESPONSE were ALGEBRA. Our WEAKNESSES in MULTIPLE CHOICE included GEOMETRY. WEAK area for OPEN RESPONSE was DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY.
  2. In 2014, ITBS scores First Grade-Math Concepts 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark. Both areas are weaknesses for our school. Second Grade-Math Concepts 46.9% scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 31.3% scored at or above benchmark. Math problems are our weakest area. In 2013, ITBS scores FIRST GRADE: MATH CONCEPTS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 20 out of 32 scored below benchmark. MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 15 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 17 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE: MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 25 students scored at or above benchmark; 13 out of 25 students scored below benchmark. STRENGTHS: MATH CONCEPTS: 16 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark; 9 out of 25 scored below benchmark. In 2012, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 53%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011-2012 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN: 25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 100% Below Basic MULTI-ETHNIC: 50%Basic 50% Advanced CAUCASIAN: 16.7% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our weak areas were MATH CONCEPTS & MATH PROBLEMS. SECOND GRADE: According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2011-2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 35% AFRICAN AMERICAN: 66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced MULTI ETHNIC: 33.3% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 33.3 Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 56% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced Our WEAK areas were MATH CONCEPTS and MATH PROBLEMS. Our data showed no strengths. KINDERGARTEN In 2011, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 55.9%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-28.6% HISPANIC-50% CAUCASIAN-60.9% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-55.2% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-100% Our STRENGTHS were numbers properties and operations and problem solving. Our WEAKNESSES were geometry and measurement. FIRST GRADE ITBS 2011 In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 51.5%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-40% CAUCASIAN-63.6% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-44% FIRST GRADE STRENGTH was measurement. WEAKNESSES were numbers and operations, geometry, and problem solving. . SECOND GRADE 2011 In 2011 ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 64.1%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-66.7% HISPANIC-40% CAUCASIAN-66.7% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-60.6% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-50% SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS were numbers and operations, algebraic concepts, geometry, and single step problems. WEAKNESSES were measurement, multiple step problems, data, relationships/trends, and comparing quantities.
  3. Lepanto Elementary's daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  4. EVALUATION This is Lepanto Elementary's fifth year to utilize THE LEARNING INSTITUTE. We will assess the impact on student achievement by analyzing students performance on TLI modules throughout the year. TLI Math Data 2014-2015 Our weak areas in FIRST GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (c) add to: start unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (j) compare: difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (k) compare: bigger unknown; understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6=6, 7=8-1,5+2=2+5, 4+1=5+2; count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral; add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, one and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten; express the length of an object as a whole number of length units; by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps; tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks; organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another; compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangle, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape (a) 2-d shapes. Our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (d) take from: result unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem . (e) take from change unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (h) put together/take apart: added unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (j) put together/take apart: both addends unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (i) compare difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (l) compare smaller unknown; determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g. , by pairing objects or counting them by 2’s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends. (a) even and odd; count within 1000, skip count by 5’s, 10’s 100’s. (b) skip counting; measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. (b) equal shares not same shape. Our weak areas in THIRD GRADE were: solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation for estimation strategies including rounding. (a) addition & subtraction; use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 to 100 (a) round to nearest 10; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. (b) subtract; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 5 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. (A range of algorithms may be used); measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g) , kilograms (k), and liters (l). 6 add subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem. (a) measure and estimate liquid volumes; draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets. (a) picture graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units); relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. (a) find perimeter. Our weak areas in FOURTH GRADE were: multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (a) equal group-unknown products, equal groups-group size unknown, equal groups-number of groups unknown, arrays, area-unknown products, arrays, area-group size unknown, arrays, area-number of groups unknown; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (b) compare-unknown product; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (d) compare- number of groups unknown; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite. (c) prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain formally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way. (b) identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself; fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure. (a) recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, line segments, rays, angles, (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. 2012-2013-As we analyzed our data for 2012-2013, we found the following weaknessess: SECOND GRADE: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-stewp word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positins; determine whether a group of objects has an odd or even number of members; count within 10000, skip county by 5's, 10's, and 100's; measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares; desvribing the shares using the word halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. We will also concentrate on CCSS weaknesses: Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations in Base Ten THIRD GRADE:interpret products of whole numbers; solve two-step word problems using the four operations; represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity;l use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value; properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 usings strategies based on place value and properties of operations; draw a scaled picture-graph adn a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several catergories; solve one- and two- step "how many more" and "how many less" praoblems using information presented in scaled bar graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares; relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons; including finding the perimeter given the side lengths; finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimters. We have adopted CCSS and will work on the following areas also: Operations & Algebraic Thinking, Numbers & Operations-Fractions FOURTH GRADE: interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicaiotn equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicatiogn equation by using draawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100; recognize that a whole numbers is a multiple of each of its factors; determine whether a given whole number in in the range of 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number; determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; fluently add and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers, using the standard algorithm; recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, lines, line segments, rays angles. and perpendicular and parallel lines. We have adopted the CCSS and will also focus on these areas of weak ness: Numbers& Operations in Base Ten and Numbers & Operations-Fractions 2011-2012 EVALUATION As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 , we found the following weaknesses: SECOND GRADE: Operations and Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. THIRD GRADE: Data analysis and probalility; measurement; numbers and operations; geometry; FOURTH GRADE: Geometry; measurement.
  5. TLI Science Data 2014 4th Grade The weak areas in SCIENCE were: generate conclusions based on evidence; evaluate the quality and feasibility of an idea or project; use simple equipment, age appropriate tools, technology, and mathematics in scientific investigations (e.g., balances, hand lenses, microscopes, rulers, thermometers, calculators, computers); apply lab safety rules as they relate to specific science lab activities; classify vertebrates into major subgroups; mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles; identify major parts and functions of the following systems: circulatory; illustrate the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem; collect and interpret measurable empirical evidence in teams and as individuals; evaluate the impact of water pollution.
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Benchmark The 2014 CRT indicated combined population scored 85% for third grade and fourth grade scored 54%. We will continue to move our third and fourth grade students to the proficient or advanced level on the Math portion of the upcoming PARRC assessment. We have adopted Common Core Standards at Lepanto Elementary. Our scores on the ACTAAP were as follows: THIRD GRADE: Combined Population 85% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra (67%), Measurement (56%), Data/Probability (62%), Numbers/Operations (72%)OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (53%), Algebra (68%), Data/Probability (50%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%); OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry (1%), Measurement (15%). FOURTH GRADE Combined Population 54% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS IN MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers/Operations (73%), Algebra (56%), Data/Probability (58%); OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement (55%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Intervention: Prescriptive Diagnostic Intervention
Scientific Based Research: An Action Based Research Study on How Using Manipulatives will Increase Students' Achievement in Mathematics. Published by Crystal Allen in 2007. Educational Leadership. February (2005) Volume 62 Number 5 How Schools Improve p. 81-83. Research Matters/How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction Nancy Safer adn Steve Fleischman. ED Thoughts: What We Know About Mathematics Teaching and Learning. p. 44-45. McRel. Edited by John Sutton and Krueger, Aurora, CO., (2002). McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G., Understanding by Design, ASCD, Alexandria, VA, p. 160, (1998).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Marilyn Rece HIGHLY QUALIFIED PARAPROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISSTANT will assist in the intervention process as tutors for grades K-4. FTE 1.00 1120 NSLA Salary
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Special Education
Marilyn Rece Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,649.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,649.00
Total Budget: $13,649.00
Intervention: Lepanto Elementary will continue to offer after school tutoring to students who qualify by use of District Generated Tests.
Scientific Based Research: SCIENTIFIC BASED RESEARCH: Reducing Dropout Rates through Expanded Learning Opportunities Laura Harris Policy Analyst October 28, 2009. "The Effects of an After-School Tutoring Program on the Academic Performance of At-Risk Students and Students with LD. F. Hock, Michael A.Pulvers, Kim D.Deshley, Donald B.Schumaker, Jean. Remedial & Special Edcuation; May/Jun 2001, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p172, 15p, 4 graphs.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
To increase Math Fluency, 3 tutors will be employed to provide additional help for students identified by teachers as need improvement. Tutors will assist with grades 1st-4th grades for 25 weeks. 3 tutors will work 2 hours per day for 4 days a week for a total of 200 hours over the duration of the year with a rate of pay at $8.26 per hour for a total cost of $6030.00 for the year. $1074.00 Benefits
Anthony Dowdy Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
 
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $4,956.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,956.00
Total Budget: $4,956.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $36302
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2013-2014 As we analyzed our data for the 2013-2014 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in Second Grade were: ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text; recount stories including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral; describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song; describe the overall structure of a story, including describing the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action; describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area; know and use various text features to locate key information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. Weak areas for THIRD GRADE were: ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language; refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters; ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; use text features and search tools to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently; distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use determiners; produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts; capitalize dates and names of people; use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series; use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Weak areas for FOURTH GRADE were: refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the meaning fo words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text; explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text; explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening; demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings; explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences; produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. Our weak areas in Third Grade were: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how (20%), know and use various text features (23%), describe how reasons support specific points the authors makes in a text (35%), identify the main topic of a multi paragraph text (44%), recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures (45%). Our weak areas in Fourth Grade were: Reading: refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a topic (19%), determine the main idea of a text; recount key details (31%), describe the relationship between a series of historical events (38%), ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text (38%), describe characters in a story (36%). Writing: demonstrate common of conventions of standard English grammar and usage (7%) demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization and punctuation (33%), produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentences (46%), use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series (47%). THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2012-2013 As we analyzed our data for the 2012-2013 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: article details;inference; main idea; literary element analysis; sequencing; vocabulary; literary devices; analysis; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area, know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. THIRD GRADE: article details; inference; literary devices; analysis; use text features and search tools to locate informatin relevant to a given topic efficiently; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; use abstract nouns; irregular nouns; subordinating conjunctions; commas; quotation marks. FOURTH GRADE: article details; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; main idea; analysis; explain how an author uses reasons for reading and evidence to support particular points in a text; fragments; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar adn usage when writing or speaking; metaphor; adage/proverb; demonstratives; adverbs; simple sentences. 2011-2012 As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our greatest need in SECOND GRADE were main topic of a multiparagraph text, identifying the main purpose of a text and know and use various text features. In SECOND GRADE WRITING demonstrate command of the conventions of standards, use commas in dates to separate single words and capitalize dates and names of people. THIRD GRADE'S weakest areas were in describe the relationship between a series, recount stories and including fables and folktales. In THIRD GRADE WRITING the data showed demonstrate command of conventions, and use knowledge of language and its conventions. . FOURTH GRADE data showed a need in the overall structure, describe in depth a character, setting or events, and determine the main idea of a text. In FOURTH GRADE WRITING the areas were produce simple, compound, and complex sentences and demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English. We will focus on these areas in both classroom instruction and intervention time.
  2. 2013-2014 ACTAAP Data According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, the data is as follows: COMBINED POPULATION: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 13% basic, 50% proficient, 25% advanced; NON DISABLED STUDENTS: 6% basic, 53% proficient, and 41% advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% proficient; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 17% below basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced. As we analyzed our data, we will strive to improve the following weak areas: CONTENT (58%) MULTIPLE CHOICE WRITING (54%) OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGES (45%) CONTENT (25%) PRACTICAL (41%) Our STRENGTHS were MULTIPLE CHOICE-LITERARY PASSAGE 62% PRACTICAL PASSAGE 71%; OPEN RESPONSE-WRITING CONTENT 61%, WRITING STYLE 63%, SENTENCE FORMATION 70%, USAGE 76%, MECHANICS 73%. 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% proficient. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, and 0% advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANAGED: 9% scored below basic, 30% scored basic, 26% scored proficient, and 36% scored advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 10% below basic, 0% basic, 30% proficient, and 60% advanced. As we analyzed our data we will strive to improve in the following weak areas: In THIRD GRADE we will work on Literary (50%), Content (50), Practical (38%) all being Open Response items. Our STRENGTHS were Multiple Choice: Content (63%), Practical (63%), Writing (63%), Content (65%), Style (65%), Sentence Formation (70%), Usage (84%), Mechanics (78%)/ 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES-0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-11% Below basic 5% Basic 84% Proficient/Advanced GENDER GAP FEMALE-7% Below Basic 7% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE 21% Below Basic 0% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced ETHNICITY-HISPANIC-40% Below Basic 0% Basic 60% Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN-6% Below Basic 6% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced Our Strengths included Multiple Choice Writing and Content Passage. Our strengths in Open Response were Reading Content and Writing Sentence Formation. We scored above State Average in all areas. We will focus on our weak areas being Multiple Choice Literacy Passage and Practical Passage. Our weak areas in Open Response were Reading Practical and Writing Content. 2013-2014 ACTAAP DATA According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the sub populations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 17% proficient, and 17% advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 39% proficient, 18% advanced; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 42% proficient, and 4% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 20% proficient, and 50% advanced. Our weak areas included WRITING MULTIPLE CHOICE (63%) and OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGE (35%). Our STRENGTHS were in the area of LITERARY PASSAGE (64%), CONTENT PASSAGE (71%) PRACTICAL (66%); open response-CONTENT PASSAGE (78%) PRACTICAL PASSAGE (63%), WRITING CONTENT (71%) STYLE (71%), SENTENCE FORMATION (80%) USAGE (89%) MECHANICS (80%) 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 90% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% advanced NON-DIABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% Advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 6% below basic, 3% basic, 42% proficient, and 48% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 11% basic, 33% proficient, and 56% advanced. In Fourth Grade, we will work on Literary (38%)and Practical (50%) in Open Response items. Our only weak area in Multiple Choice for Fourth Grade was Writing (50%). Our STRENGTHS included the following: all strands of Writing: Content(74%),Style (74%), Sentence Formation (88%), Usage (98%), Mechanics (86%); MULTIPLE CHOICE: Literary (63%), Content (75%), Practical (75%). OPEN RESPONSE: Content (63%). 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 87% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-3.1% Below Basic 11.1% Basic 86% Proficient/Advanced MALE-7.1% Below Basic 7.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE-0% Below Basic 13.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced WHITE-4.1% Below Basic 8.1% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced Our STRENGTHS in Multiple Choice include Writing-Multiple Choice. Open Response Reading Practical Passage, Writing Sentence Formation, Writing Usage, Writing Mechanics. Our WEAKEST areas in multiple choice was Reading Practical Passage. In Open Response Writing Style Domain, Writing Content Domain and Reading Content Domain.
  3. 2013-2014 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2014, FIRST GRADE: COMBINED POPULATION VOCABULARY Out of 31 students tested, 12 scored above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-out of 31 students tested, 15 scored above benchmark, SPELLING-31 students tested, 14 scored above benchmark. Weak areas being in VOCABULARY. SECOND GRADE ITBS DATA 2013-2014 COMBINED POPULATION-VOCABULARY 31.3% above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-43.8% above benchmark, SPELLING-43.7% above benchmark. Our weakest area being in VOCABULARY. 2012-2013 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2013, FIRST GRADE: VOCABULARY 26 out of 32 students scored below basic. 6 out of 32 students scored at or above benchmark. SPELLING: 18 out of 32 scored below basic. 14 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION: 17 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. 15 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE VOCABULARY: 14 out of 25 scored below benchmark. 11 out of 25 scored 44% at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark. 10 out of 25 scored below benchmark. Our STRENGTHS were in COMPREHENSION for both grades with 17 out of 32 scoring at or above benchmark in FIRST GRADE and 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark in SECOND GRADE. SECOND GRADE had a STRENGTH in SPELLING with 13 our of 25 scored at or above benchmark. Our WEAKNESSESS were in VOCABULARY with 26 out of 32 scoring below benchmark and SPELLING with 18 out of 32 scored below benchmark. According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2011-2012, out of 31 students tested, First Grade scored 41% in Reading and 47% in Language. When analyzing the subpopulations, they were as follows: African American-25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient HISPANIC-100% Below Basic CAUCASIAN-16.7% Below Basic 33.3% in Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED- 18.5 Below Basic 37% Basic 44% Proficient/Advanced SECOND GRADE 2011-2012 Overall, 36 students tested-38% Reading 40% Language. When the sub populations were analyzed the results are the following: African American-66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced Hispanic-50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Causasion-41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 41.6 Proficient/Advanced Economically Disadvantaged-46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced
  4. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2013-2014 KINDERGARTEN: EOY-46 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY-45 students were tested 44% scored at or above benchmark 18% scored some risk 38% scored at risk FIRST GRADE EOY-31 students were tested 32% scored at risk 10% scored some risk 58% scored at or above benchmark BOY:34 students were tested 64% scored at or above benchmark 21% scored some risk 15% scored at risk SECOND GRADE EOY-32 students were tested 6% scored at risk 16% scored some risk 78% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 16 students were tested 88% scored at or above benchmark 6% scored some risk 6% scored at risk THIRD GRADE EOY-24 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 15 students were tested 47% scored at or above benchmark 20% scored some risk 33% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2012-2013 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested 50%% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 33% scored low risk EOY-36 students were tested 81% scored low risk 11% scored some risk 8% scored at risk FIRST GRADE: BOY-36 students were tested 33% scored well below benchmark 19% scored below benchmark 48% scored at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 53 scored low risk 38 scored some risk 9% scored at risk SECOND GRADE: BOY-25 students were tested 84% students scored at or above benchmark 8% scored some risk 8% scored at risk EOY-24 students were tested 83% scored low risk 17% scored some risk 0 scored at risk THIRD GRADE: BOY- 36 students were tested 46% were well below benchmark 3% were below benchmark 51% were at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 62% scored low risk 3% scored some risk 46% scored at risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-40 students were tested 60% were at or above benchmark 15% were some risk 25% were at risk EOY-40 students were tested 65% scored at or above benchmark 15% scored some risk 20% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2011-2012 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-33 students tested. 10 students low risk 10 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-35 students tested 17 students low risk 14 students some risk 4 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 28 students low risk 7 students some risk 2 students high risk FIRST GRADE BOY-29 students tested 18 low risk 5 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-29 students tested 17 students low risk 6 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-31 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 5 students high risk SECOND GRADE BOY-32 students tested 23 low risk 3 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-38 students tested 21 students low risk 2 students some risk 15 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 20 students low risk 7 students some risk 9 students high risk THIRD GRADE BOY-38 students tested 22 students low risk 6 students some risk 10 students high risk MOY-41 students tested 25 students low risk 10 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-41 students tested 29 students low risk 5 students some risk 7 students low risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-37 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-36 students tested 24 students low risk 3 students some risk 9 students high risk EOY-38 students tested 19 students low risk 10 students some risk 9 students high risk
  5. Lepanto Elementary's average daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  6. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2014-2015 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested First Sound Fluency: 25% scored at risk 11% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark FIRST GRADE: BOY-43 students were tested Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark Phoneme Segmentation Fluency: 9% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 72% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Correct Letter Sound 7% scored at risk 23% scored some risk 70% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Word Read 58% scored some risk 42% scored at or above benchmark SECOND GRADE-26 students were tested Nonsense Word Fluency-Correct Letter Sound 39% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency-Words Read 19% scored at risk 27% scored some risk 54% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Fluency 27% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 54% scored at or above risk DORF-Accuracy 12% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 76% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Retell 24% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark THIRD GRADE: 51 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 18% scored at risk 35% scored some risk 47% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 14% scored at risk 25% scored some risk 61% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 2% scored at risk 8% scored some risk 90% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 22% scored at risk 22% scored some risk 56% scored at or above benchmark FOURTH GRADE 46 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 39% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 20% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 65% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 11% scored at risk 89% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 15% scored at risk 33% scored some risk 52% scored at or above benchmark
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to utilize our data, interventions, and tutoring to improve and motivate our students in their weakest areas, while striving to meet the rigor of PARCC and Common Core State Standards.
Benchmark Lepanto Elementary scored 87.27% for combined population in Literacy. We will continue to enhance our students knowledge base as set forth in the Common Core State Standards.
Intervention: Lepanto Elementary is continuing to utilize STANDARDS BASED INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES including the COMMON CORE STANDARDS.
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005). Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Reserach on Progress Monitoring?" Scientific Based Research: The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comrehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief. Marianne Perie, Scott Marion, Brian Gong, and Judy Wurtzel. November (2007). Lorrie Shepard, Jane Hannaway, Eva Baker. (2009) Copyright by National Academy of Education. Standards, Assessments-and What Else? The Essential Elements of Standards-Based School Improvement; CSE Technical Report 528; Diane J. Briars, Pittsburgh Public Schools; Lauren B. Resnick, CRESST/University of Pittsburgh; August 2000.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
"G/A" Literacy Coach, Paige Tyler will produce, examine, and share reports showing students' reading progress with teachers and administrators. She will share this information during COMMON PLANNING TIME and any after school meetings. Materials/Supplies
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Paige Tyler Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $703.00

ACTION BUDGET: $703.00
Total Budget: $703.00
Intervention: Lepanto Elementary is in its fifth year of transitioning to COMMON CORE STANDARDS and will continue to utilize COMPREHENSIVE LITERACY STRATEGIES to enhance the education of its students in the classroom setting. We will continue to utilize the Put Reading First building blocks for reading.
Scientific Based Research: Mission Statement." Common Core State Standards Initiative. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2013 Donna DiPrima Bickel, et al. "Investigating The Effectiveness Of A Comprehensive Literacy Coaching Program In Schools With High Teacher Mobility." Elementary School Journal 111.1 (2010): 35-62. ERIC. Web. 11 Sept. 2013. The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute Brooks, D. Christopher. “Space Matters: The impact of Formal Learning Environments’ On student Learning. “ British Journal of Educational Technology 42.5 (2011): 719-726. ERIC. Web. 6 Sept. 2013. Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Reserach on Progress Monitoring?" Dorn, LJ.,French C., T. 1998. Apprenticeship in Literacy: Transitions Across Reading and Writing."Stenhouse Publishers, Portland, Maine. Put Reading First The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children To Read: National Reading Panel, Teaching Children to Read: Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and Its Implications for Reading Instruction-Reports of the subgroups. National Institute for Literacy at ED Pubs." Morris, Betty. (2002). “Overcoming Dyslexia.” Shaywitz, Sally E., ( 1996). “Dyslexia” Scientific American, (1996): November.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Train Kindergarten and Second Grade Teachers in Orton Interventions. Purchase materials to be used by the teachers to implement Orton in the classrooms.
Action Type: Professional Development
Paige Tyler Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $4,576.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,576.00
Purchase individual reading books to be used by Debbie Duford.
Debbie Duford Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $312.00

ACTION BUDGET: $312.00
Total Budget: $4,888.00
Goal All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
Benchmark All kindergarten students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten prepared for math and reading readiness.
Intervention: Two ABC preschool classrooms will serve the Lepanto campus providing transition from home to school for low income families.
Scientific Based Research: "The Effects of Preschool Experiences on Academic Achievement of First Graders Kohart, Rebecca; Nickell, Kathryn June 1994, Starting at 3, a project of Education Law Center, supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, 2005 Education Law Center Hustedt, Jason T., et al. "The effects of the Arkansas Better Chance Program on young children’s school readiness." National Institute for Early Education Research (2007)
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will continue to fund the NSLA Pre-K classroom due to the large number of children who couldn't get into the regular ABC Pre-K program. We felt this was a good use of our monies. 1 classified teacher and 1 parapro hired. PD/Materials & Supplies used to set classroom up. They are under Department of Human Services and Arkansas Minimun Licensure.
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Professional Development
Connie Gill, June Franks Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Central Office
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $9,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $9,000.00
Total Budget: $9,000.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 85% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 25% basic, 76% proficient/advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS 12% basic, 88% proficient/advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% basic; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 89% proficient/advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 33% basic, 67% proficient/advanced We will focus on our greatest areas of needs: Geometry (44%) and Measurement (15%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 73.61% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 23% basic, 39% proficient, and 39% advanced. LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 26% basic, 57% proficient, and 17% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 20% basic, 0% proficient, and 80% advanced. We will focus on our greatest areas of being Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations-Fractions. 2012 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84.49% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: Below Basic 8% Basic 11% 81%% Proficient/Advanced LEP: Below Basic: 40% Basic 0% 60% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 0% Below Basic 12% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 7% Below Basic 7% Basic 85% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 7% Below Basic 10% Basic 82% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history shows a gain of 2.49% from last year. Our weaknesses in MULTIPLE CHOICE were DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY AND MEASUREMENT. OPEN RESPONSE WEAKNESSES were DATA ANALYSIS % PROBABILITY/NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS. Our STRENGTHS included for MULTIPLE CHOICE NUMBERS & OPERATIONS. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE were GEOMETRY. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE 2013-2014 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall, 54% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 34% proficient/advanced NON DIABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 57% proficient/advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 50% below basic, 50% basic ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 46% proficient/advanced NON ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 70% proficient/advanced We will FOCUS on our weak areas: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%), Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra (39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year is as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 50% below basic, 25% basic, 25% proficient, and 0% advanced NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 12% basic, 50% proficient, and 35% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 40% basic, 40% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 12% below basic, 0% basic, 45% proficient, and 24% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% below basic, 0 basic, 44% proficient, and 44% advanced. We will FOCUS on Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: COMBINED: 13.1% Below Basic 21.1% Basic 66% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 14% Below Basic 20% Basic 65% Proficient/Advanced LEP: 0% Below Basic 25% Basic 75% Proficient/Advanced CAUSCASIAN: 19% Below Basic 33% Basic 62% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 20% Below Basic 33% Basic 47% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 9% Below Basic 13% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history showed a 1% gain over 2011 school year. Our STRENGTHS included MEASUREMENT in MULTIPLE CHOICE. STRENGTHS in OPEN RESPONSE were ALGEBRA. Our WEAKNESSES in MULTIPLE CHOICE included GEOMETRY. WEAK area for OPEN RESPONSE was DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY.
  2. In 2014, ITBS scores First Grade-Math Concepts 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark. Both areas are weaknesses for our school. Second Grade-Math Concepts 46.9% scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 31.3% scored at or above benchmark. Math problems are our weakest area. In 2013, ITBS scores FIRST GRADE: MATH CONCEPTS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 20 out of 32 scored below benchmark. MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 15 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 17 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE: MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 25 students scored at or above benchmark; 13 out of 25 students scored below benchmark. STRENGTHS: MATH CONCEPTS: 16 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark; 9 out of 25 scored below benchmark. In 2012, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 53%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011-2012 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN: 25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 100% Below Basic MULTI-ETHNIC: 50%Basic 50% Advanced CAUCASIAN: 16.7% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our weak areas were MATH CONCEPTS & MATH PROBLEMS. SECOND GRADE: According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2011-2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 35% AFRICAN AMERICAN: 66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced MULTI ETHNIC: 33.3% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 33.3 Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 56% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced Our WEAK areas were MATH CONCEPTS and MATH PROBLEMS. Our data showed no strengths. KINDERGARTEN In 2011, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 55.9%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-28.6% HISPANIC-50% CAUCASIAN-60.9% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-55.2% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-100% Our STRENGTHS were numbers properties and operations and problem solving. Our WEAKNESSES were geometry and measurement. FIRST GRADE ITBS 2011 In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 51.5%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-40% CAUCASIAN-63.6% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-44% FIRST GRADE STRENGTH was measurement. WEAKNESSES were numbers and operations, geometry, and problem solving. . SECOND GRADE 2011 In 2011 ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 64.1%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-66.7% HISPANIC-40% CAUCASIAN-66.7% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-60.6% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-50% SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS were numbers and operations, algebraic concepts, geometry, and single step problems. WEAKNESSES were measurement, multiple step problems, data, relationships/trends, and comparing quantities.
  3. Lepanto Elementary's daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  4. EVALUATION This is Lepanto Elementary's fifth year to utilize THE LEARNING INSTITUTE. We will assess the impact on student achievement by analyzing students performance on TLI modules throughout the year. TLI Math Data 2014-2015 Our weak areas in FIRST GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (c) add to: start unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (j) compare: difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (k) compare: bigger unknown; understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6=6, 7=8-1,5+2=2+5, 4+1=5+2; count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral; add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, one and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten; express the length of an object as a whole number of length units; by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps; tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks; organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another; compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangle, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape (a) 2-d shapes. Our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (d) take from: result unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem . (e) take from change unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (h) put together/take apart: added unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (j) put together/take apart: both addends unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (i) compare difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (l) compare smaller unknown; determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g. , by pairing objects or counting them by 2’s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends. (a) even and odd; count within 1000, skip count by 5’s, 10’s 100’s. (b) skip counting; measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. (b) equal shares not same shape. Our weak areas in THIRD GRADE were: solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation for estimation strategies including rounding. (a) addition & subtraction; use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 to 100 (a) round to nearest 10; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. (b) subtract; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 5 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. (A range of algorithms may be used); measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g) , kilograms (k), and liters (l). 6 add subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem. (a) measure and estimate liquid volumes; draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets. (a) picture graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units); relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. (a) find perimeter. Our weak areas in FOURTH GRADE were: multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (a) equal group-unknown products, equal groups-group size unknown, equal groups-number of groups unknown, arrays, area-unknown products, arrays, area-group size unknown, arrays, area-number of groups unknown; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (b) compare-unknown product; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (d) compare- number of groups unknown; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite. (c) prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain formally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way. (b) identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself; fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure. (a) recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, line segments, rays, angles, (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. 2012-2013-As we analyzed our data for 2012-2013, we found the following weaknessess: SECOND GRADE: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-stewp word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positins; determine whether a group of objects has an odd or even number of members; count within 10000, skip county by 5's, 10's, and 100's; measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares; desvribing the shares using the word halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. We will also concentrate on CCSS weaknesses: Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations in Base Ten THIRD GRADE:interpret products of whole numbers; solve two-step word problems using the four operations; represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity;l use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value; properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 usings strategies based on place value and properties of operations; draw a scaled picture-graph adn a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several catergories; solve one- and two- step "how many more" and "how many less" praoblems using information presented in scaled bar graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares; relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons; including finding the perimeter given the side lengths; finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimters. We have adopted CCSS and will work on the following areas also: Operations & Algebraic Thinking, Numbers & Operations-Fractions FOURTH GRADE: interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicaiotn equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicatiogn equation by using draawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100; recognize that a whole numbers is a multiple of each of its factors; determine whether a given whole number in in the range of 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number; determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; fluently add and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers, using the standard algorithm; recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, lines, line segments, rays angles. and perpendicular and parallel lines. We have adopted the CCSS and will also focus on these areas of weak ness: Numbers& Operations in Base Ten and Numbers & Operations-Fractions 2011-2012 EVALUATION As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 , we found the following weaknesses: SECOND GRADE: Operations and Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. THIRD GRADE: Data analysis and probalility; measurement; numbers and operations; geometry; FOURTH GRADE: Geometry; measurement.
  5. TLI Science Data 2014 4th Grade The weak areas in SCIENCE were: generate conclusions based on evidence; evaluate the quality and feasibility of an idea or project; use simple equipment, age appropriate tools, technology, and mathematics in scientific investigations (e.g., balances, hand lenses, microscopes, rulers, thermometers, calculators, computers); apply lab safety rules as they relate to specific science lab activities; classify vertebrates into major subgroups; mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles; identify major parts and functions of the following systems: circulatory; illustrate the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem; collect and interpret measurable empirical evidence in teams and as individuals; evaluate the impact of water pollution.
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Benchmark The 2014 CRT indicated combined population scored 85% for third grade and fourth grade scored 54%. We will continue to move our third and fourth grade students to the proficient or advanced level on the Math portion of the upcoming PARRC assessment. We have adopted Common Core Standards at Lepanto Elementary. Our scores on the ACTAAP were as follows: THIRD GRADE: Combined Population 85% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra (67%), Measurement (56%), Data/Probability (62%), Numbers/Operations (72%)OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (53%), Algebra (68%), Data/Probability (50%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%); OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry (1%), Measurement (15%). FOURTH GRADE Combined Population 54% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS IN MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers/Operations (73%), Algebra (56%), Data/Probability (58%); OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement (55%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Intervention: Computer Assisted Instruction
Scientific Based Research: Ed Thoughts: What We Know About Mathematics Teaching and Learning. p. 61-71, McRel, edited by John Sutton and Alice Krueger, Aurora, CO, 2002. PRWeb, "Reserach Study Shows Stunning Gains for Elemenrtary Student with Person's enVisionMATH Program" April, 2010.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will purchase 8 IPADS and 1 MAC Computer for use by students for research.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Mike Kelly Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $3,903.00

ACTION BUDGET: $3,903.00
Lepanto Elementary purchased 10 computers at $631.45 each plus tax and then 16 computers at $673.80 for the library for students in K-4 grades to utilize for research projects.
Carey Smith Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • School Library
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $17,808.00

ACTION BUDGET: $17,808.00
Total Budget: $21,711.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $5148
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2013-2014 As we analyzed our data for the 2013-2014 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in Second Grade were: ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text; recount stories including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral; describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song; describe the overall structure of a story, including describing the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action; describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area; know and use various text features to locate key information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. Weak areas for THIRD GRADE were: ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language; refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters; ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers; use text features and search tools to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently; distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use determiners; produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts; capitalize dates and names of people; use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series; use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Weak areas for FOURTH GRADE were: refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the meaning fo words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text; determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text; explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text; explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking; use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening; demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings; explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences; produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. Our weak areas in Third Grade were: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how (20%), know and use various text features (23%), describe how reasons support specific points the authors makes in a text (35%), identify the main topic of a multi paragraph text (44%), recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures (45%). Our weak areas in Fourth Grade were: Reading: refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a topic (19%), determine the main idea of a text; recount key details (31%), describe the relationship between a series of historical events (38%), ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text (38%), describe characters in a story (36%). Writing: demonstrate common of conventions of standard English grammar and usage (7%) demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization and punctuation (33%), produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentences (46%), use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series (47%). THE LEARNING INSTITUTE DATA 2012-2013 As we analyzed our data for the 2012-2013 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: article details;inference; main idea; literary element analysis; sequencing; vocabulary; literary devices; analysis; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area, know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently; identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. THIRD GRADE: article details; inference; literary devices; analysis; use text features and search tools to locate informatin relevant to a given topic efficiently; describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text; use abstract nouns; irregular nouns; subordinating conjunctions; commas; quotation marks. FOURTH GRADE: article details; inference; determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology; explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama when writing or speaking about a text; compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations; main idea; analysis; explain how an author uses reasons for reading and evidence to support particular points in a text; fragments; demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar adn usage when writing or speaking; metaphor; adage/proverb; demonstratives; adverbs; simple sentences. 2011-2012 As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 school year from The Learning Institute we found that our greatest need in SECOND GRADE were main topic of a multiparagraph text, identifying the main purpose of a text and know and use various text features. In SECOND GRADE WRITING demonstrate command of the conventions of standards, use commas in dates to separate single words and capitalize dates and names of people. THIRD GRADE'S weakest areas were in describe the relationship between a series, recount stories and including fables and folktales. In THIRD GRADE WRITING the data showed demonstrate command of conventions, and use knowledge of language and its conventions. . FOURTH GRADE data showed a need in the overall structure, describe in depth a character, setting or events, and determine the main idea of a text. In FOURTH GRADE WRITING the areas were produce simple, compound, and complex sentences and demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English. We will focus on these areas in both classroom instruction and intervention time.
  2. 2013-2014 ACTAAP Data According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, the data is as follows: COMBINED POPULATION: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 13% basic, 50% proficient, 25% advanced; NON DISABLED STUDENTS: 6% basic, 53% proficient, and 41% advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% proficient; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 17% below basic, 53% proficient, and 37% advanced. As we analyzed our data, we will strive to improve the following weak areas: CONTENT (58%) MULTIPLE CHOICE WRITING (54%) OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGES (45%) CONTENT (25%) PRACTICAL (41%) Our STRENGTHS were MULTIPLE CHOICE-LITERARY PASSAGE 62% PRACTICAL PASSAGE 71%; OPEN RESPONSE-WRITING CONTENT 61%, WRITING STYLE 63%, SENTENCE FORMATION 70%, USAGE 76%, MECHANICS 73%. 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% proficient. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 0% basic, 0% proficient, and 0% advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANAGED: 9% scored below basic, 30% scored basic, 26% scored proficient, and 36% scored advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 10% below basic, 0% basic, 30% proficient, and 60% advanced. As we analyzed our data we will strive to improve in the following weak areas: In THIRD GRADE we will work on Literary (50%), Content (50), Practical (38%) all being Open Response items. Our STRENGTHS were Multiple Choice: Content (63%), Practical (63%), Writing (63%), Content (65%), Style (65%), Sentence Formation (70%), Usage (84%), Mechanics (78%)/ 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 year the THIRD GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES-0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-11% Below basic 5% Basic 84% Proficient/Advanced GENDER GAP FEMALE-7% Below Basic 7% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE 21% Below Basic 0% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced ETHNICITY-HISPANIC-40% Below Basic 0% Basic 60% Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN-6% Below Basic 6% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced Our Strengths included Multiple Choice Writing and Content Passage. Our strengths in Open Response were Reading Content and Writing Sentence Formation. We scored above State Average in all areas. We will focus on our weak areas being Multiple Choice Literacy Passage and Practical Passage. Our weak areas in Open Response were Reading Practical and Writing Content. 2013-2014 ACTAAP DATA According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 88% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the sub populations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 17% proficient, and 17% advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 39% proficient, 18% advanced; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 42% proficient, and 4% advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 20% proficient, and 50% advanced. Our weak areas included WRITING MULTIPLE CHOICE (63%) and OPEN RESPONSE LITERARY PASSAGE (35%). Our STRENGTHS were in the area of LITERARY PASSAGE (64%), CONTENT PASSAGE (71%) PRACTICAL (66%); open response-CONTENT PASSAGE (78%) PRACTICAL PASSAGE (63%), WRITING CONTENT (71%) STYLE (71%), SENTENCE FORMATION (80%) USAGE (89%) MECHANICS (80%) 2012-2013 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 90% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 13% below basic, 25% basic, 50% proficient, and 13% advanced NON-DIABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 0% basic, 38% proficient, and 59% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 1: 0% MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% Advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 0% basic, 40% proficient, and 40% advanced 1ST YEAR LEP STUDENTS: 0% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 6% below basic, 3% basic, 42% proficient, and 48% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 11% basic, 33% proficient, and 56% advanced. In Fourth Grade, we will work on Literary (38%)and Practical (50%) in Open Response items. Our only weak area in Multiple Choice for Fourth Grade was Writing (50%). Our STRENGTHS included the following: all strands of Writing: Content(74%),Style (74%), Sentence Formation (88%), Usage (98%), Mechanics (86%); MULTIPLE CHOICE: Literary (63%), Content (75%), Practical (75%). OPEN RESPONSE: Content (63%). 2011-2012 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall 87% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-3.1% Below Basic 11.1% Basic 86% Proficient/Advanced MALE-7.1% Below Basic 7.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE-0% Below Basic 13.1% Basic 87% Proficient/Advanced WHITE-4.1% Below Basic 8.1% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN-0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced Our STRENGTHS in Multiple Choice include Writing-Multiple Choice. Open Response Reading Practical Passage, Writing Sentence Formation, Writing Usage, Writing Mechanics. Our WEAKEST areas in multiple choice was Reading Practical Passage. In Open Response Writing Style Domain, Writing Content Domain and Reading Content Domain.
  3. 2013-2014 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2014, FIRST GRADE: COMBINED POPULATION VOCABULARY Out of 31 students tested, 12 scored above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-out of 31 students tested, 15 scored above benchmark, SPELLING-31 students tested, 14 scored above benchmark. Weak areas being in VOCABULARY. SECOND GRADE ITBS DATA 2013-2014 COMBINED POPULATION-VOCABULARY 31.3% above benchmark, COMPREHENSION-43.8% above benchmark, SPELLING-43.7% above benchmark. Our weakest area being in VOCABULARY. 2012-2013 ITBS DATA According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2013, FIRST GRADE: VOCABULARY 26 out of 32 students scored below basic. 6 out of 32 students scored at or above benchmark. SPELLING: 18 out of 32 scored below basic. 14 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION: 17 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark. 15 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE VOCABULARY: 14 out of 25 scored below benchmark. 11 out of 25 scored 44% at or above benchmark. COMPREHENSION 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark. 10 out of 25 scored below benchmark. Our STRENGTHS were in COMPREHENSION for both grades with 17 out of 32 scoring at or above benchmark in FIRST GRADE and 15 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark in SECOND GRADE. SECOND GRADE had a STRENGTH in SPELLING with 13 our of 25 scored at or above benchmark. Our WEAKNESSESS were in VOCABULARY with 26 out of 32 scoring below benchmark and SPELLING with 18 out of 32 scored below benchmark. According to the data from the ITBS for the school year 2011-2012, out of 31 students tested, First Grade scored 41% in Reading and 47% in Language. When analyzing the subpopulations, they were as follows: African American-25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient HISPANIC-100% Below Basic CAUCASIAN-16.7% Below Basic 33.3% in Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED- 18.5 Below Basic 37% Basic 44% Proficient/Advanced SECOND GRADE 2011-2012 Overall, 36 students tested-38% Reading 40% Language. When the sub populations were analyzed the results are the following: African American-66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced Hispanic-50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Causasion-41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 41.6 Proficient/Advanced Economically Disadvantaged-46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced
  4. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2013-2014 KINDERGARTEN: EOY-46 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY-45 students were tested 44% scored at or above benchmark 18% scored some risk 38% scored at risk FIRST GRADE EOY-31 students were tested 32% scored at risk 10% scored some risk 58% scored at or above benchmark BOY:34 students were tested 64% scored at or above benchmark 21% scored some risk 15% scored at risk SECOND GRADE EOY-32 students were tested 6% scored at risk 16% scored some risk 78% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 16 students were tested 88% scored at or above benchmark 6% scored some risk 6% scored at risk THIRD GRADE EOY-24 students were tested 17% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 66% scored at or above benchmark BOY: 15 students were tested 47% scored at or above benchmark 20% scored some risk 33% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2012-2013 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested 50%% scored at risk 17% scored some risk 33% scored low risk EOY-36 students were tested 81% scored low risk 11% scored some risk 8% scored at risk FIRST GRADE: BOY-36 students were tested 33% scored well below benchmark 19% scored below benchmark 48% scored at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 53 scored low risk 38 scored some risk 9% scored at risk SECOND GRADE: BOY-25 students were tested 84% students scored at or above benchmark 8% scored some risk 8% scored at risk EOY-24 students were tested 83% scored low risk 17% scored some risk 0 scored at risk THIRD GRADE: BOY- 36 students were tested 46% were well below benchmark 3% were below benchmark 51% were at or above benchmark EOY-32 students were tested 62% scored low risk 3% scored some risk 46% scored at risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-40 students were tested 60% were at or above benchmark 15% were some risk 25% were at risk EOY-40 students were tested 65% scored at or above benchmark 15% scored some risk 20% scored at risk DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2011-2012 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-33 students tested. 10 students low risk 10 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-35 students tested 17 students low risk 14 students some risk 4 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 28 students low risk 7 students some risk 2 students high risk FIRST GRADE BOY-29 students tested 18 low risk 5 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-29 students tested 17 students low risk 6 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-31 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 5 students high risk SECOND GRADE BOY-32 students tested 23 low risk 3 students some risk 6 students high risk MOY-38 students tested 21 students low risk 2 students some risk 15 students high risk EOY-37 students tested 20 students low risk 7 students some risk 9 students high risk THIRD GRADE BOY-38 students tested 22 students low risk 6 students some risk 10 students high risk MOY-41 students tested 25 students low risk 10 students some risk 6 students high risk EOY-41 students tested 29 students low risk 5 students some risk 7 students low risk FOURTH GRADE BOY-37 students tested 16 students low risk 8 students some risk 13 students high risk MOY-36 students tested 24 students low risk 3 students some risk 9 students high risk EOY-38 students tested 19 students low risk 10 students some risk 9 students high risk
  5. Lepanto Elementary's average daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  6. DIBELS ASSESSMENT 2014-2015 KINDERGARTEN: BOY-36 students were tested First Sound Fluency: 25% scored at risk 11% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark FIRST GRADE: BOY-43 students were tested Letter Naming Fluency: 100% scored at or above benchmark Phoneme Segmentation Fluency: 9% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 72% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Correct Letter Sound 7% scored at risk 23% scored some risk 70% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency: Word Read 58% scored some risk 42% scored at or above benchmark SECOND GRADE-26 students were tested Nonsense Word Fluency-Correct Letter Sound 39% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark Nonsense Word Fluency-Words Read 19% scored at risk 27% scored some risk 54% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Fluency 27% scored at risk 19% scored some risk 54% scored at or above risk DORF-Accuracy 12% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 76% scored at or above benchmark DORF-Retell 24% scored at risk 12% scored some risk 64% scored at or above benchmark THIRD GRADE: 51 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 18% scored at risk 35% scored some risk 47% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 14% scored at risk 25% scored some risk 61% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 2% scored at risk 8% scored some risk 90% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 22% scored at risk 22% scored some risk 56% scored at or above benchmark FOURTH GRADE 46 students were tested DORF (Fluency) 39% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 46% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Accuracy) 20% scored at risk 15% scored some risk 65% scored at or above benchmark DORF (Retell) 11% scored at risk 89% scored at or above benchmark DAZE 15% scored at risk 33% scored some risk 52% scored at or above benchmark
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to utilize our data, interventions, and tutoring to improve and motivate our students in their weakest areas, while striving to meet the rigor of PARCC and Common Core State Standards.
Benchmark Lepanto Elementary scored 87.27% for combined population in Literacy. We will continue to enhance our students knowledge base as set forth in the Common Core State Standards.
Intervention: Lepanto Elementary is continuing to utilize STANDARDS BASED INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES including the COMMON CORE STANDARDS.
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005). Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Reserach on Progress Monitoring?" Scientific Based Research: The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comrehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief. Marianne Perie, Scott Marion, Brian Gong, and Judy Wurtzel. November (2007). Lorrie Shepard, Jane Hannaway, Eva Baker. (2009) Copyright by National Academy of Education. Standards, Assessments-and What Else? The Essential Elements of Standards-Based School Improvement; CSE Technical Report 528; Diane J. Briars, Pittsburgh Public Schools; Lauren B. Resnick, CRESST/University of Pittsburgh; August 2000.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will purchase DIBELS software to be used in all classrooms. 63000/65000 Purchased services
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Title I Schoolwide
Paige Tyler Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Central Office
  • Computers
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,253.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,253.00
Total Budget: $2,253.00
Goal All students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten more prepared for math and reading readiness.
Benchmark All kindergarten students who attended Pre-K will enter kindergarten prepared for math and reading readiness.
Intervention: Two ABC preschool classrooms will serve the Lepanto campus providing transition from home to school for low income families.
Scientific Based Research: "The Effects of Preschool Experiences on Academic Achievement of First Graders Kohart, Rebecca; Nickell, Kathryn June 1994, Starting at 3, a project of Education Law Center, supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, 2005 Education Law Center Hustedt, Jason T., et al. "The effects of the Arkansas Better Chance Program on young children’s school readiness." National Institute for Early Education Research (2007)
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will continue to fund the NSLA Pre-K classroom due to the large number of children who couldn't get into the regular ABC Pre-K program. We felt this was a good use of our monies. 1 classified teacher and 1 parapro hired. PD/Materials & Supplies used to set classroom up. They are under Department of Human Services and Arkansas Minimun Licensure.
Action Type: Parental Engagement
Action Type: Professional Development
Connie Gill, June Franks Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Central Office
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $500.00

ACTION BUDGET: $500.00
Total Budget: $500.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 85% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 25% basic, 76% proficient/advanced; NON-DISABLED STUDENTS 12% basic, 88% proficient/advanced; LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 100% basic; ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% basic, 89% proficient/advanced; NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 33% basic, 67% proficient/advanced We will focus on our greatest areas of needs: Geometry (44%) and Measurement (15%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year our data is as follows: Overall: 73.61% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: STUDENENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 23% basic, 39% proficient, and 39% advanced. LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 50% basic, 50% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 26% basic, 57% proficient, and 17% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 0% below basic, 20% basic, 0% proficient, and 80% advanced. We will focus on our greatest areas of being Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations-Fractions. 2012 BENCHMARK DATA THIRD GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84.49% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: Below Basic 8% Basic 11% 81%% Proficient/Advanced LEP: Below Basic: 40% Basic 0% 60% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 0% Basic 100% Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 0% Below Basic 12% Basic 88% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 7% Below Basic 7% Basic 85% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 7% Below Basic 10% Basic 82% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history shows a gain of 2.49% from last year. Our weaknesses in MULTIPLE CHOICE were DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY AND MEASUREMENT. OPEN RESPONSE WEAKNESSES were DATA ANALYSIS % PROBABILITY/NUMBERS AND OPERATIONS. Our STRENGTHS included for MULTIPLE CHOICE NUMBERS & OPERATIONS. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE were GEOMETRY. 2014 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE 2013-2014 According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2014 school year, the FOURTH GRADE BENCHMARK DATA is as follows: Overall, 54% Proficient/Advanced. When analyzing the subpopulations, they scored as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 33% below basic, 33% basic, 34% proficient/advanced NON DIABLED STUDENTS: 18% below basic, 25% basic, 57% proficient/advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 50% below basic, 50% basic ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 21% below basic, 33% basic, 46% proficient/advanced NON ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 10% basic, 70% proficient/advanced We will FOCUS on our weak areas: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%), Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra (39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%). 2013 BENCHMARK DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2013 school year is as follows: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: 50% below basic, 25% basic, 25% proficient, and 0% advanced NON-DISABLED STUDENTS: 3% below basic, 12% basic, 50% proficient, and 35% advanced. MONITORED FORMER LEP STUDENTS YEAR 2: 100% advanced LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS: 20% below basic, 40% basic, 40% proficient, and 0% advanced. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 12% below basic, 0% basic, 45% proficient, and 24% advanced. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: 11% below basic, 0 basic, 44% proficient, and 44% advanced. We will FOCUS on Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. DATA FOURTH GRADE According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 84% PROFICIENT/ADVANCED Analysis of subpopulations are as follows: COMBINED: 13.1% Below Basic 21.1% Basic 66% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 14% Below Basic 20% Basic 65% Proficient/Advanced LEP: 0% Below Basic 25% Basic 75% Proficient/Advanced CAUSCASIAN: 19% Below Basic 33% Basic 62% Proficient/Advanced MALE: 20% Below Basic 33% Basic 47% Proficient/Advanced FEMALE: 9% Below Basic 13% Basic 78% Proficient/Advanced AFRICAN AMERICAN: 0% Below Basic 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our performance history showed a 1% gain over 2011 school year. Our STRENGTHS included MEASUREMENT in MULTIPLE CHOICE. STRENGTHS in OPEN RESPONSE were ALGEBRA. Our WEAKNESSES in MULTIPLE CHOICE included GEOMETRY. WEAK area for OPEN RESPONSE was DATA ANALYSIS & PROBABILITY.
  2. In 2014, ITBS scores First Grade-Math Concepts 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 12 out of 31 scored at or above benchmark. Both areas are weaknesses for our school. Second Grade-Math Concepts 46.9% scored at or above benchmark; Math Problems 31.3% scored at or above benchmark. Math problems are our weakest area. In 2013, ITBS scores FIRST GRADE: MATH CONCEPTS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 20 out of 32 scored below benchmark. MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 15 out of 32 scored at or above benchmark; 17 out of 32 scored below benchmark. SECOND GRADE: MATH PROBLEMS: WEAKNESS 12 out of 25 students scored at or above benchmark; 13 out of 25 students scored below benchmark. STRENGTHS: MATH CONCEPTS: 16 out of 25 scored at or above benchmark; 9 out of 25 scored below benchmark. In 2012, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 53%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011-2012 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN: 25% Below Basic 50% Basic 25% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 100% Below Basic MULTI-ETHNIC: 50%Basic 50% Advanced CAUCASIAN: 16.7% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced Our weak areas were MATH CONCEPTS & MATH PROBLEMS. SECOND GRADE: According to the TREND ANALYSIS for the 2011-2012 school year is as follows: OVERALL: 35% AFRICAN AMERICAN: 66.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 16.7% Proficient/Advanced HISPANIC: 50% Basic 50% Proficient/Advanced MULTI ETHNIC: 33.3% Below Basic 33.3% Basic 33.3 Proficient/Advanced CAUCASIAN: 41.7% Below Basic 16.7% Basic 56% Proficient/Advanced ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED: 46.4% Below Basic 25% Basic 28.6% Proficient/Advanced Our WEAK areas were MATH CONCEPTS and MATH PROBLEMS. Our data showed no strengths. KINDERGARTEN In 2011, ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 55.9%. According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the data is as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-28.6% HISPANIC-50% CAUCASIAN-60.9% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-55.2% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-100% Our STRENGTHS were numbers properties and operations and problem solving. Our WEAKNESSES were geometry and measurement. FIRST GRADE ITBS 2011 In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 51.5%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-40% CAUCASIAN-63.6% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-44% FIRST GRADE STRENGTH was measurement. WEAKNESSES were numbers and operations, geometry, and problem solving. . SECOND GRADE 2011 In 2011 ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 64.1%. The subpopulations were as follows: AFRICAN AMERICAN-66.7% HISPANIC-40% CAUCASIAN-66.7% ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-60.6% LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT-50% SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS were numbers and operations, algebraic concepts, geometry, and single step problems. WEAKNESSES were measurement, multiple step problems, data, relationships/trends, and comparing quantities.
  3. Lepanto Elementary's daily attendance rate for 2012-2013 was 94.2%, 2011-2012 was 94.3%, 2010-2011 was 92.8%.
  4. EVALUATION This is Lepanto Elementary's fifth year to utilize THE LEARNING INSTITUTE. We will assess the impact on student achievement by analyzing students performance on TLI modules throughout the year. TLI Math Data 2014-2015 Our weak areas in FIRST GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (c) add to: start unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (j) compare: difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem (k) compare: bigger unknown; understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6=6, 7=8-1,5+2=2+5, 4+1=5+2; count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral; add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, one and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten; express the length of an object as a whole number of length units; by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps; tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks; organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another; compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangle, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape (a) 2-d shapes. Our weak areas in SECOND GRADE were: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (d) take from: result unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem . (e) take from change unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (h) put together/take apart: added unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (j) put together/take apart: both addends unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (i) compare difference unknown; use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (l) compare smaller unknown; determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g. , by pairing objects or counting them by 2’s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends. (a) even and odd; count within 1000, skip count by 5’s, 10’s 100’s. (b) skip counting; measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape. (b) equal shares not same shape. Our weak areas in THIRD GRADE were: solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation for estimation strategies including rounding. (a) addition & subtraction; use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 to 100 (a) round to nearest 10; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. (b) subtract; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 x 80, 5 x 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. (A range of algorithms may be used); measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g) , kilograms (k), and liters (l). 6 add subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem. (a) measure and estimate liquid volumes; draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets. (a) picture graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and improvised units); relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters. (a) find perimeter. Our weak areas in FOURTH GRADE were: multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (a) equal group-unknown products, equal groups-group size unknown, equal groups-number of groups unknown, arrays, area-unknown products, arrays, area-group size unknown, arrays, area-number of groups unknown; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g. by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (b) compare-unknown product; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. (d) compare- number of groups unknown; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite. (c) prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain formally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way. (b) identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself; fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure. (a) recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, line segments, rays, angles, (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. 2012-2013-As we analyzed our data for 2012-2013, we found the following weaknessess: SECOND GRADE: use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one and two-stewp word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positins; determine whether a group of objects has an odd or even number of members; count within 10000, skip county by 5's, 10's, and 100's; measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen; partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares; desvribing the shares using the word halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc. We will also concentrate on CCSS weaknesses: Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations in Base Ten THIRD GRADE:interpret products of whole numbers; solve two-step word problems using the four operations; represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity;l use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100; fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value; properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 usings strategies based on place value and properties of operations; draw a scaled picture-graph adn a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several catergories; solve one- and two- step "how many more" and "how many less" praoblems using information presented in scaled bar graphs; measure areas by counting unit squares; relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition; solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons; including finding the perimeter given the side lengths; finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimters. We have adopted CCSS and will work on the following areas also: Operations & Algebraic Thinking, Numbers & Operations-Fractions FOURTH GRADE: interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicaiotn equation as a comparison; multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicatiogn equation by using draawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison; find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100; recognize that a whole numbers is a multiple of each of its factors; determine whether a given whole number in in the range of 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number; determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite; generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule; use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place; fluently add and subtracts multi-digit whole numbers, using the standard algorithm; recognize angle measure as additive; draw points, lines, line segments, rays angles. and perpendicular and parallel lines. We have adopted the CCSS and will also focus on these areas of weak ness: Numbers& Operations in Base Ten and Numbers & Operations-Fractions 2011-2012 EVALUATION As we analyzed our data for the 2011-2012 , we found the following weaknesses: SECOND GRADE: Operations and Algebraic Thinking and Numbers & Operations in Base Ten. THIRD GRADE: Data analysis and probalility; measurement; numbers and operations; geometry; FOURTH GRADE: Geometry; measurement.
  5. TLI Science Data 2014 4th Grade The weak areas in SCIENCE were: generate conclusions based on evidence; evaluate the quality and feasibility of an idea or project; use simple equipment, age appropriate tools, technology, and mathematics in scientific investigations (e.g., balances, hand lenses, microscopes, rulers, thermometers, calculators, computers); apply lab safety rules as they relate to specific science lab activities; classify vertebrates into major subgroups; mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles; identify major parts and functions of the following systems: circulatory; illustrate the interdependence of organisms in an ecosystem; collect and interpret measurable empirical evidence in teams and as individuals; evaluate the impact of water pollution.
Goal Our goal at Lepanto Elementary is to prepare our students to achieve success on the PARCC assessment. We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Benchmark The 2014 CRT indicated combined population scored 85% for third grade and fourth grade scored 54%. We will continue to move our third and fourth grade students to the proficient or advanced level on the Math portion of the upcoming PARRC assessment. We have adopted Common Core Standards at Lepanto Elementary. Our scores on the ACTAAP were as follows: THIRD GRADE: Combined Population 85% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra (67%), Measurement (56%), Data/Probability (62%), Numbers/Operations (72%)OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (53%), Algebra (68%), Data/Probability (50%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%); OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry (1%), Measurement (15%). FOURTH GRADE Combined Population 54% proficient/advanced. STRENGTHS IN MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers/Operations (73%), Algebra (56%), Data/Probability (58%); OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement (55%). We will strive to improve in our weak areas: MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry (44%), Measurement (46%); OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers/Operations (44%), Algebra(39%), Geometry (25%), Data/Probability (28%).
Intervention: Computer Assisted Instruction
Scientific Based Research: Ed Thoughts: What We Know About Mathematics Teaching and Learning. p. 61-71, McRel, edited by John Sutton and Alice Krueger, Aurora, CO, 2002. PRWeb, "Reserach Study Shows Stunning Gains for Elemenrtary Student with Person's enVisionMATH Program" April, 2010.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Lepanto Elementary will purchase Follett software will be maintained for the library.
Carey Smith Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $1,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,000.00
Lepanto Elementary will purchase a subscription to Brian Pop for use by teachers and students.
Mike Kelly Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Central Office
  • Computers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $1,395.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,395.00
Total Budget: $2,395.00

TYRONZA ELEMENTARY -- $171552

Source of Funds

For: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits, NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries, NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies, NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects, NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services.


Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay -- $9941
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP math Priority:

    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 80 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 32% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 57% PROFICIENT, and 19% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, Female 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 19% Below Basic, 48% Basic, 33% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 17% Basic, 48% Proficient, 35% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: all multiple choice were above 50%. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, data analysis and probability. The data showed that the scores remained the same. According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 53 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 21% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 100% PROFICIENT, and 0% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 30% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 22% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 33% Proficient, 30% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 29% Proficient, 29% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 100% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 40% Proficient, 27% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 20% DECREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 49 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 30% scored BASIC, and 22% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 23% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 10% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 17% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 17% ADVANCED. Male 19% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 46% Proficient, 4% Advanced, Female 24% Below Basic, 29% Basic, 29% Proficient, 18% Advanced, African American 50% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 25% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 40% Proficient, 13% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 17% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 54% Below Basic, 38% Basic, 8% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 17% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, and data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations, measurement and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry, measurement and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 3% INCREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6th GRADE. Overall, 59 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 20% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 39% PROFICIENT, and 12% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 8% BASIC, 69% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Male 24% Below Basic, 19% Basic, 48% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 18% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 23% Below Basic, 16% Basic, 48% Proficient, 14% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 70% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 10% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 9% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 55% Proficient, 16% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 33% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: measurement. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: numbers and operations.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 10% scored BASIC, and10 % BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 47% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 60% ADVANCED. Male 70% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 90% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, 13% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% INCREASE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement, Geometry, and Data and Probablilty. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 65% compared to the state total of 71%, Data Analysis and Probability-61% compared to the state total of 73%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis in O/R, and numbers and operations in O/R, Measurement, Geometry, and Algebra. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 73% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 17% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 47% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A- ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 56% ADVANCED, 13% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Measurement, and Data and Probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, Geometry, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, measurement O/R, and Data Analysis and Probability O/R. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 46% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 28% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 33% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 7% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 9% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 64% PROFICIENT, and 9% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, 67% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 33% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 7% ADVANCED, 42% PROFICIENT, 23% BASIC, 28% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 15% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement, and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability, Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Data Analysis and Probability, and Geometry. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, and Measurement. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6TH GRADE. Overall, 64% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 10% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 12% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 28% PROFICIENT, and 32% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 66% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 25% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 42% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 20% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 5% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: N/A. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, algebra, and data analysis and probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on number and operations, and measurement. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    2012
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 25% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33 % BASIC, 25% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 17% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 29% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECLINE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement and Algebra. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 72% compared to the state total of 78%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis, probability, and numbers and operations in O/R.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 79% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 15% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 46% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 3% PROFICIENT, and 3% ADVANCED. Male 38% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 32% ADVANCED, 47% PROFICIENT, 11% BASIC, 11% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 4% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 61% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 23% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 36% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 30% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Male 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 26% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 18% ADVANACED, 36% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 27% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 28% ADVANCED, 40% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 15% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 16% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 9% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 11% BELOW BASIC, 27% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 68 % ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 50% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 25% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 43% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 10% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 3% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Data Analysis/Probability. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on data analysis/probability.
    2011
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 78% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 76%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Number and Operations and Data Analysis. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra and Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Measurement as well as open response questions focusing on algebra and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 4TH GRADE: Overall, 83% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 79%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 89% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, and Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 10% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, and Algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Geometry and Measurement in 4th grade.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 5th GRADE. Overall, 77% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75%, Non-economically disadvantaged 81%, Male 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 83% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 25% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations, and Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Measurement, Numbers and Operations, and Data and Probability.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 6th GRADE. Overall, 66% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 63%, Non-economically disadvantaged 79%, Male 56% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 34% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 65% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability and Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement, and Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Algebra and Geometry. In Open Response we will focus on Measurement and Numbers and Operations.
  2. 2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2011-2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
  3. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%. 2011/2012 was 94.96%, and 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
  4. 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st) - Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding, to taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in positions, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. 2. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. 3. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (addition). 4. Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. 5. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equals shares created smaller shares. 6. Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. 7. Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral. 8. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers who sum is less than or equal to 20, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown to represent the problem. 9. Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps. 10. Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used. Second Grade (2nd) are as follows: 1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Compare: Difference Unknown) 2. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions ( Compare: Bigger Unknown). 3. Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >,=, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. 4. Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write and equations to express and even number as a sum of two equal addends. b. write and equation. 5. Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds (addition). 6. Understand that the three digit number represents amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones. 7. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknown positions. 9. Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. 10. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Result Unknown). Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters (find perimeters). 2. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognizes area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts applying this technique to solve real world problems. 3. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the sides’ lengths, finding and unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas with the same area and different perimeters (compare area and perimeter). 4. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including (Addition and Subtraction). 5. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. 6. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. (Picture graph) 7Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs (bar graph). 8. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. 9. Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. A. represents a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line. 10. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). 6 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (perimeter). 2. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the rage 1-100 is a multiple of a given one digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime of composite (prime or composite). 3. Apply area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (Area). 4. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (find unknown angle). 5. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm, kg, g, lb, oz, ml, hr, min, sec; Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. 6. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (recognize angle measure as additive). 7. Multiply of divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. 8. Draw points, line, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in tow-dimensional figures. 9. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison e.g. Interpret 35=5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. (Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison). 10. Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison for additive comparison. (Compare-number of groups unknown). Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: 1. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consistent of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. 2. Apply and extent previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction of a whole number by a fraction. B. Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by tilting it with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles and represent fraction produces as rectangular areas. 3. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. B. a solid figure can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units. 4. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition an solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. A. find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as it would be found by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of the base. Represent threefold whole-number products as volumes, to represent the associative property of multiplication. 5. Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. 6. Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by: a. comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication. 7. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume. 8. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. C. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two non-overlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. 9. Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. 10. Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions. Sixth Grade (6th) are as follows: 1. Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. 2. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinates axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. A. Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line; recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself. 3. Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to expression quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought as the independent variables using graphs and tables, relate these to the equation. 4. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 5. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 6. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expression to produce the equivalent expression. 7. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. 8. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 9. Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values. 10. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents. A. write numerical expressions.
    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two- step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, compare: difference unknown, compare: bigger unknown, write and equation, understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amount of hundreds, tens, ones, compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits using >, =, and < symbols, add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations, add and subtract within 1000 using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares. Third Grade- Solve two-step word problems using the four operations, use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100, understand a fraction as a number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram, explain equivalence of fractions by reasoning their size, draw a scaled picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories, bar graphs, picture graphs, relate areas to operations of multiplication and addition, solve real world and mathematical problems finding perimeter, compare area and perimeter, partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Fourth Grade- Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplication comparison, compare- number of groups unknown, multiples, know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including: km, m, cm; kg, g, lb, oz, l, ml, hr, min, sec., Area, Perimeter, Recognize angle measure as additive, find unknown angles, draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines: identify these in two-dimensional figures. Fifth Grade- Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them-read, write, and compare decimal to thousandths, add and subtract fractions with like denominators, apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or a whole number by a fraction, interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), Apply and extend previous understandings of division and divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions, recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. Sixth Grade- Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write and equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, solve real- world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane, apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions, understand a rational number as a point on the number line (coordinate plane), understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values, write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents.
    11-12-THE LEARNING INSTITUTE: Analyzing data from 11-12 we found these areas that need improvement for the 12-13 school year: FIRST GRADE: Represent a whole number less than 15 in all possible ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 20 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 20 in various forms. Recognize the number or quality of sets up to 10 without counting, regardless of arrangement. Compare 2 numbers, with less than 12 in each set, using objects and pictures with and without appropriate technology. Count on and back using physical models or a number line starting at any whole number to fifty. Develop an understanding of the commutative property of addition using objects. Develop and understanding of the commutative property of addition. Apply number theory: odd or even. Apply number theory: use conventional symbols to represent the operations of addition and subtraction. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Develop strategies for basic addition. Solve addition problems by using a variety of methods. Solve subtraction problems by using a variety of methods and tools. Sort and classify objects by one or two attributes in more than one way. Identify and describe patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count. Recognize, extend, and create simple repeating patterns using a wide variety of materials and describe those using words. Interpret qualitative change. Compare three-dimensional solids. Compare and make geometric figures. Identify a line of symmetry. Replicate a simple two-dimensional figure from a briefly displayed example. Recognize that new figures can be created by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize the number of days in a week and the number of days in a month using a calendar. Orally sequence the months of a year. Recognize that an hour is longer than a minute and a minute is longer than a second. Recognize coins. Compare the value of coins. Distinguish between hot and cold temperatures on a thermometer. Recognize attributes of measurement and tools used to measure. Use a calendar to determine elapsed time. Tell time to the half-hour. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations. Determine the value of a small collection of coins. Show different combinations of coins. Select the appropriate non-standard measurement tools for length, capacity and mass. Estimate and measure the capacity, volume, length, width, weight, and mass of an object. Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs, Venn diagram, t chart. Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart. Describe probability of an event with more, less, or equally likely to occur. SECOND GRADE: Use efficient strategies to count a given set of objects in groups of 2s and 5s. Represent a whole number in multiple ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 100 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 100 in various forms. Determine relative position using ordinal numbers. Compare 2 numbers, less than 100 using numerals without appropriate technology. Model and use the commutative property for addition. Apply number theory. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Model, represent and explain division as sharing equally and represented subtraction in contextual situations. Develop strategies for basic addition facts. Demonstrate multiple strategies for adding two-digit whole numbers. Demonstrate computational fluency. State the value of a dollar. Demonstrate computational fluency. Use estimation strategies to solve addition problems and judge in reasonableness of the answer. Sort, classify, and label objects by 3 or more attributes in more than one way. Describe repeating patterns in the environment. Describe growing patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count forward and backward when given a number less than or equal to 100. Identify, describe and extend skip counting patterns from any given number. Identify a number that is more or less than any whole number less than 100 using multiples of ten. Compare the value of coins. Recognize, describe, extend, and create growing patterns using a wide variety of materials to solve problems. Select and/or write number sentences to find the unknown in problem-solving contexts involving two-digit addition and subtraction using appropriate labels. Interpret and compare quantitative change. Identify, classify and describe two-dimensional geometric figures. Use lines of symmetry to demonstrate and describe congruent figures within a two-dimensional figure. Create new figures by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize there are 12 months in a year and that each month has a specific number of days. Compare temperatures using the Fahrenheit scale. Tell time to the nearest 5 minute interval. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations in hour increments regardless of starting time. Demonstrate a given value of money up to $1.00 using a variety of coin combinations. Estimate and Measure length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools. Identify the purpose for data collection and collect, organize, record, and display the stat using physical materials. Make simple predications for a set of given data.
  5. TLI 5th Grade Science:
    Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: Compare the cell theory to the characteristics of a scientific theory. 2. Calculate mode from scientific data using SI units. 3. Identify the transfer of energy using pyramids; terrestrial and aquatic. 4. Identify characteristics of physical change. 5. Calculate range from scientific data using Si units. 6. Calculate median from scientific data using SI units. 7. Examine the role of limiting factors on the carrying capacity of an ecosystem: food, space, water, shelter. 8. Conduct investigations using: inclined planes-ramps. 9. Compare the human body’s mass to weight on Earth, the moon, and other planets in our solar system. 10. Explain the role of observation in the development of a theory.
Goal Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored a 59.09. We are a Needs Improvement school in Math. We will continue to strive to show growth in 2014-2015 school year, in order to make AMO of 83.12.
Intervention: Provide a standards based math program utilizing Common Core Math Curriculum.
Scientific Based Research: U.S. Department of Education, " What works Clearinghouse: EnVisionMATH" January, 2013.
PRWeb, "Reserach Study Shows Stunning Gains for Elemenrtary Student with Person's enVisionMATH Program" April, 2010.
An Action Based Research Study on How Using Manipulatives will Increase Students' Achievement in Mathematics. Published by Crystal Allen in 2007.
Standards, Assessments, and Accountability (2009) National Academy of Education.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
2 smartboards will be purchased to enhance our daily instruction. These smartboards will help reach the individual needs of every student.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Janice Baine and Tabitha Thacker Start: 07/01/2015
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $8,759.00

ACTION BUDGET: $8,759.00
Total Budget: $8,759.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance math instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: A Job-Embedded Professional Development: What It Is, Who is Responsible, and How to Get It Done Well, published by Andrew Croft, Jane G Coggshall, ph.D., Megan Dolan, Ed. D., Elizabeth Powers, Joellen Killion in 2010.
Michelle Larocque, Ira Kleiman, and Sharon M. Darling. (2011) "Parental Involvement: The Missing Link in School Achievement". 55(3), 115-122.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
11 ipads and 1 mac computer will be purchased to run the ipad mobile card. The mobile cart will help enhance instruction within the classroom. The mobile cart will hold 30 ipads and students will have one to one with the devices.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Capital Outlay: $1,182.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,182.00
Total Budget: $1,182.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits -- $26309
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .8 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $8,876.00

ACTION BUDGET: $8,876.00
(Jan Mullins)Paraprofessional will assist teachers in small groups in grades K-6. Providing interventions in response to literacy. 1120 FTE 1.00
Jan Mullins, paraprofessional, Doris Armstrong, paraprofessional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $3,009.00

ACTION BUDGET: $3,009.00
Frances Busby will be a child care provider for one child.
Jacinda Prince, Principal Start: 08/18/2014
End: 05/30/2015
  • Performance Assessments
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $4,638.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,638.00
Total Budget: $16,523.00
Intervention: Implementing Standards Based Instructional Practices
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Judy Meyer will be hired as an interventionist for grade k-6. She will help students to achieve common core standards. FTE 1.00 1591/62000
Action Type: Collaboration
Judy Meyer Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $4,800.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,800.00
Keiona Smith will tutor at risk students 30 minutes in the mornings.
Keiona Smith Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $159.00

ACTION BUDGET: $159.00
Total Budget: $4,959.00
Intervention: COMPUTER LAB
Scientific Based Research: "What Do Students Need to Know?", Willard R. Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc., published in Smart Start Summer Conference Program Materials Booklet, 1999 by the National School Conference Institute.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Computer lab manager will maintain Title I computer lab for grades K-6. 1120. FTE 1.00 Survey results are as follows: 153 students were asked if they were asked if they were comfortable using a computer, 153 said yes. 153 students were asked if they had internet at home, 20 replied with no and 133 replied yes. 153 students were asked if they were comfortable asking for help in computer lab, and 153 said yes.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doris Armstrong, computer para professional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Computers
  • District Staff
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Benefits: $4,827.00

ACTION BUDGET: $4,827.00
Total Budget: $4,827.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries -- $94647
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .8 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $39,316.00

ACTION BUDGET: $39,316.00
(Jan Mullins)Paraprofessional will assist teachers in small groups in grades K-6. Providing interventions in response to literacy. 1120 FTE 1.00
Jan Mullins, paraprofessional, Doris Armstrong, paraprofessional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,899.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,899.00
Frances Busby will be a child care provider for one child.
Jacinda Prince, Principal Start: 08/18/2014
End: 05/30/2015
  • Performance Assessments
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,024.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,024.00
Total Budget: $66,239.00
Intervention: Implementing Standards Based Instructional Practices
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Judy Meyer will be hired as an interventionist for grade k-6. She will help students to achieve common core standards. FTE 1.00 1591/62000
Action Type: Collaboration
Judy Meyer Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,774.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,774.00
Keiona Smith will tutor at risk students 30 minutes in the mornings.
Keiona Smith Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $735.00

ACTION BUDGET: $735.00
Total Budget: $14,509.00
Intervention: COMPUTER LAB
Scientific Based Research: "What Do Students Need to Know?", Willard R. Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc., published in Smart Start Summer Conference Program Materials Booklet, 1999 by the National School Conference Institute.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Computer lab manager will maintain Title I computer lab for grades K-6. 1120. FTE 1.00 Survey results are as follows: 153 students were asked if they were asked if they were comfortable using a computer, 153 said yes. 153 students were asked if they had internet at home, 20 replied with no and 133 replied yes. 153 students were asked if they were comfortable asking for help in computer lab, and 153 said yes.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Doris Armstrong, computer para professional Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Computers
  • District Staff
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Employee Salaries: $13,899.00

ACTION BUDGET: $13,899.00
Total Budget: $13,899.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies -- $35402
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .8 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $1,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,000.00
Total Budget: $1,000.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance literacy instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Research on Progress Monitoring?" Brooks, D. Christopher. “Space Matters: The impact of Formal Learning Environments’ On student Learning. “ British Journal of Educational Technology 42.5 (2011): 719-726. ERIC. Web. 6 Sept. 2013.
Morris, Betty. (2002). “Overcoming Dyslexia.” Shaywitz, Sally E., ( 1996). “Dyslexia” Scientific American, (1996): November.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Tyronza Elementary will implement the Orton Gillingham Dyslexia program for all students. We will purchase raised alphabet letters, spellers, sand trays, glass beads, and glass slates. These items will be purchased for every student in grades K-2nd.
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $6,740.00

ACTION BUDGET: $6,740.00
Total Budget: $6,740.00
Intervention: COMPUTER LAB
Scientific Based Research: "What Do Students Need to Know?", Willard R. Daggett, International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc., published in Smart Start Summer Conference Program Materials Booklet, 1999 by the National School Conference Institute.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Teachers will take students to the computer lab to work on common core research projects. There will be four research projects due per student each year. The research projects will be completed based on common core standards. Purchase of a computer lab printer.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
All classroom teachers Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $760.00

ACTION BUDGET: $760.00
32 computers will be purchased to update our 7 year old computer lab. These computers will help our students with research projects. These computers will also help enhance daily instruction.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $21,568.00

ACTION BUDGET: $21,568.00
Total Budget: $22,328.00
Priority 2: Math
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP math Priority:

    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 80 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 32% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 57% PROFICIENT, and 19% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, Female 0% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 55% Proficient, 27% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 19% Below Basic, 48% Basic, 33% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 17% Basic, 48% Proficient, 35% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: all multiple choice were above 50%. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, data analysis and probability. The data showed that the scores remained the same. According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 53 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 21% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 100% PROFICIENT, and 0% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 30% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 22% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 33% Proficient, 30% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 29% Proficient, 29% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 100% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 40% Proficient, 27% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra, numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 20% DECREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 49 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 30% scored BASIC, and 22% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 23% BELOW BASIC, 29% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 10% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 17% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 17% ADVANCED. Male 19% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 46% Proficient, 4% Advanced, Female 24% Below Basic, 29% Basic, 29% Proficient, 18% Advanced, African American 50% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 25% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 21% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 40% Proficient, 13% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 17% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 54% Below Basic, 38% Basic, 8% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 17% Below Basic, 28% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: geometry, and data analysis and probability. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: numbers and operations, measurement and algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: geometry, measurement and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and numbers and operations. The data showed that the scores had a 3% INCREASE.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6th GRADE. Overall, 59 % scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 20% scored BASIC, and 20% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 24% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 39% PROFICIENT, and 12% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 8% BASIC, 69% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Male 24% Below Basic, 19% Basic, 48% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 18% Below Basic, 21% Basic, 45% Proficient, 15% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 23% Below Basic, 16% Basic, 48% Proficient, 14% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 70% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 10% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 9% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 55% Proficient, 16% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 33% Proficient, 0% Advanced. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: measurement. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE: algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: algebra and data analysis and probability. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: numbers and operations.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 10% scored BASIC, and10 % BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 47% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 60% ADVANCED. Male 70% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 90% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, 13% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% INCREASE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement, Geometry, and Data and Probablilty. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 65% compared to the state total of 71%, Data Analysis and Probability-61% compared to the state total of 73%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis in O/R, and numbers and operations in O/R, Measurement, Geometry, and Algebra. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 73% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 17% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 13% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 47% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A- ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 56% ADVANCED, 13% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations, Algebra, Measurement, and Data and Probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, Geometry, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, measurement O/R, and Data Analysis and Probability O/R. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 46% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 28% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 33% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 7% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 9% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 64% PROFICIENT, and 9% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, 67% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 33% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 7% ADVANCED, 42% PROFICIENT, 23% BASIC, 28% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 15% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement, and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability, Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, Data Analysis and Probability, and Geometry. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra, and Measurement. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows:
    6TH GRADE. Overall, 64% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 26% scored BASIC, and 10% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 12% BELOW BASIC, 28% BASIC, 28% PROFICIENT, and 32% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 66% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 25% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 42% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 20% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 5% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: N/A. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, algebra, and data analysis and probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on number and operations, and measurement. (We will follow Common Core standards, and some of the weaknesses are not addressed within that grade. We will work to our best knowledge to improve the weaknesses along with the common core standards.)
    2012
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 25% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33 % BASIC, 25% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 17% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 29% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECLINE in performance. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Measurement and Algebra. Strength in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations- 72% compared to the state total of 78%. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Data and Analysis, probability, and numbers and operations in O/R.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 79% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 11% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 15% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 46% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 3% PROFICIENT, and 3% ADVANCED. Male 38% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 32% ADVANCED, 47% PROFICIENT, 11% BASIC, 11% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 4% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry, and measurement. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Analysis and Probability, and numbers and operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 61% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 23% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 36% PROFICIENT, and 23% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 30% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Male 27% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 26% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 18% ADVANACED, 36% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 27% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 28% ADVANCED, 40% PROFICIENT, 18% BASIC, 15% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 16% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Geometry and Data Analysis/ Probability. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on geometry, numbers and operations, and data analysis/probability. According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in math is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 69% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 9% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 11% BELOW BASIC, 27% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 68 % ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 50% ADVANACED, 25% PROFICIENT, 25% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. , Caucasian 43% ADVANCED, 29% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 10% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 3% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: number and operations. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Data Analysis/Probability. Strength in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on data analysis/probability.
    2011
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 78% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 76%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Number and Operations and Data Analysis. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Algebra and Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Measurement as well as open response questions focusing on algebra and measurement.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 4TH GRADE: Overall, 83% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 79%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 89% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, and Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 10% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability, Numbers and Operations and Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Measurement and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Numbers and Operations, and Algebra. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Geometry and Measurement in 4th grade.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 5th GRADE. Overall, 77% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75%, Non-economically disadvantaged 81%, Male 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 69% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 75% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 83% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 25% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Algebra. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Numbers and Operations, and Measurement. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Data and Probability. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Measurement, Numbers and Operations, and Data and Probability.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Math is as follows: 6th GRADE. Overall, 66% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 63%, Non-economically disadvantaged 79%, Male 56% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 82% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 34% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 65% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 7% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Data Analysis and Probability and Measurement. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Algebra and Geometry. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Geometry. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Measurement, and Numbers and Operations. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically in Algebra and Geometry. In Open Response we will focus on Measurement and Numbers and Operations.
  2. 2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2011-2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
  3. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%. 2011/2012 was 94.96%, and 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
  4. 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st) - Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding, to taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in positions, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. 2. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. 3. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (addition). 4. Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks. 5. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equals shares created smaller shares. 6. Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. 7. Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral. 8. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers who sum is less than or equal to 20, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown to represent the problem. 9. Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps. 10. Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used. Second Grade (2nd) are as follows: 1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Compare: Difference Unknown) 2. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions ( Compare: Bigger Unknown). 3. Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >,=, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. 4. Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write and equations to express and even number as a sum of two equal addends. b. write and equation. 5. Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds (addition). 6. Understand that the three digit number represents amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones. 7. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknown positions. 9. Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. 10. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing with unknowns in all positions (Result Unknown). Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters (find perimeters). 2. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. D. recognizes area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts applying this technique to solve real world problems. 3. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including finding the perimeter given the sides’ lengths, finding and unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas with the same area and different perimeters (compare area and perimeter). 4. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including (Addition and Subtraction). 5. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. 6. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. (Picture graph) 7Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set within several categories. Solve one-and two-step “how many more” and “how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs (bar graph). 8. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size. 9. Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. A. represents a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line. 10. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). 6 Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (perimeter). 2. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the rage 1-100 is a multiple of a given one digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime of composite (prime or composite). 3. Apply area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems (Area). 4. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (find unknown angle). 5. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm, kg, g, lb, oz, ml, hr, min, sec; Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. 6. Recognize angles as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram on real world and mathematical problems by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure (recognize angle measure as additive). 7. Multiply of divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. 8. Draw points, line, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in tow-dimensional figures. 9. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison e.g. Interpret 35=5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. (Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison). 10. Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison for additive comparison. (Compare-number of groups unknown). Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: 1. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consistent of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. 2. Apply and extent previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction of a whole number by a fraction. B. Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by tilting it with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles and represent fraction produces as rectangular areas. 3. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. B. a solid figure can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units. 4. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition an solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. A. find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as it would be found by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of the base. Represent threefold whole-number products as volumes, to represent the associative property of multiplication. 5. Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. 6. Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by: a. comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication. 7. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. A. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a “unit cube” is said to have “one cubic unit” of volume, and can be used to measure volume. 8. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume. C. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two non-overlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems. 9. Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. 10. Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions. Sixth Grade (6th) are as follows: 1. Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers. 2. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinates axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. A. Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line; recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself. 3. Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to expression quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought as the independent variables using graphs and tables, relate these to the equation. 4. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 5. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 6. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expression to produce the equivalent expression. 7. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. 8. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the plane with negative number coordinates. 9. Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values. 10. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents. A. write numerical expressions.
    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Math showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two- step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, compare: difference unknown, compare: bigger unknown, write and equation, understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amount of hundreds, tens, ones, compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits using >, =, and < symbols, add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations, add and subtract within 1000 using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares. Third Grade- Solve two-step word problems using the four operations, use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100, understand a fraction as a number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram, explain equivalence of fractions by reasoning their size, draw a scaled picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories, bar graphs, picture graphs, relate areas to operations of multiplication and addition, solve real world and mathematical problems finding perimeter, compare area and perimeter, partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Fourth Grade- Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplication comparison, compare- number of groups unknown, multiples, know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including: km, m, cm; kg, g, lb, oz, l, ml, hr, min, sec., Area, Perimeter, Recognize angle measure as additive, find unknown angles, draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines: identify these in two-dimensional figures. Fifth Grade- Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them-read, write, and compare decimal to thousandths, add and subtract fractions with like denominators, apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or a whole number by a fraction, interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), Apply and extend previous understandings of division and divide unit fractions by whole number and whole numbers by unit fractions, recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. Sixth Grade- Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the question and accounts for it in the answers, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write and equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable, understand a rational number as a point on the number line, solve real- world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane, apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions, understand a rational number as a point on the number line (coordinate plane), understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values, write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents.
    11-12-THE LEARNING INSTITUTE: Analyzing data from 11-12 we found these areas that need improvement for the 12-13 school year: FIRST GRADE: Represent a whole number less than 15 in all possible ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 20 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 20 in various forms. Recognize the number or quality of sets up to 10 without counting, regardless of arrangement. Compare 2 numbers, with less than 12 in each set, using objects and pictures with and without appropriate technology. Count on and back using physical models or a number line starting at any whole number to fifty. Develop an understanding of the commutative property of addition using objects. Develop and understanding of the commutative property of addition. Apply number theory: odd or even. Apply number theory: use conventional symbols to represent the operations of addition and subtraction. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Use physical, pictorial and symbolic models to demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Develop strategies for basic addition. Solve addition problems by using a variety of methods. Solve subtraction problems by using a variety of methods and tools. Sort and classify objects by one or two attributes in more than one way. Identify and describe patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count. Recognize, extend, and create simple repeating patterns using a wide variety of materials and describe those using words. Interpret qualitative change. Compare three-dimensional solids. Compare and make geometric figures. Identify a line of symmetry. Replicate a simple two-dimensional figure from a briefly displayed example. Recognize that new figures can be created by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize the number of days in a week and the number of days in a month using a calendar. Orally sequence the months of a year. Recognize that an hour is longer than a minute and a minute is longer than a second. Recognize coins. Compare the value of coins. Distinguish between hot and cold temperatures on a thermometer. Recognize attributes of measurement and tools used to measure. Use a calendar to determine elapsed time. Tell time to the half-hour. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations. Determine the value of a small collection of coins. Show different combinations of coins. Select the appropriate non-standard measurement tools for length, capacity and mass. Estimate and measure the capacity, volume, length, width, weight, and mass of an object. Analyze and interpret concrete and pictorial graphs, Venn diagram, t chart. Make a true statement about the data displayed on a graph or chart. Describe probability of an event with more, less, or equally likely to occur. SECOND GRADE: Use efficient strategies to count a given set of objects in groups of 2s and 5s. Represent a whole number in multiple ways using composition and decomposition. Connect various physical models and representations to the quantities they represent using number names, numerals and number words to 100 with and without appropriate technology. Represent numbers to 100 in various forms. Determine relative position using ordinal numbers. Compare 2 numbers, less than 100 using numerals without appropriate technology. Model and use the commutative property for addition. Apply number theory. Demonstrate various meanings of addition and subtraction. Model, represent and explain division as sharing equally and represented subtraction in contextual situations. Develop strategies for basic addition facts. Demonstrate multiple strategies for adding two-digit whole numbers. Demonstrate computational fluency. State the value of a dollar. Demonstrate computational fluency. Use estimation strategies to solve addition problems and judge in reasonableness of the answer. Sort, classify, and label objects by 3 or more attributes in more than one way. Describe repeating patterns in the environment. Describe growing patterns in the environment. Use patterns to count forward and backward when given a number less than or equal to 100. Identify, describe and extend skip counting patterns from any given number. Identify a number that is more or less than any whole number less than 100 using multiples of ten. Compare the value of coins. Recognize, describe, extend, and create growing patterns using a wide variety of materials to solve problems. Select and/or write number sentences to find the unknown in problem-solving contexts involving two-digit addition and subtraction using appropriate labels. Interpret and compare quantitative change. Identify, classify and describe two-dimensional geometric figures. Use lines of symmetry to demonstrate and describe congruent figures within a two-dimensional figure. Create new figures by combining and subdividing models of existing figures. Recognize there are 12 months in a year and that each month has a specific number of days. Compare temperatures using the Fahrenheit scale. Tell time to the nearest 5 minute interval. Determine elapsed time in contextual situations in hour increments regardless of starting time. Demonstrate a given value of money up to $1.00 using a variety of coin combinations. Estimate and Measure length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools. Identify the purpose for data collection and collect, organize, record, and display the stat using physical materials. Make simple predications for a set of given data.
  5. TLI 5th Grade Science:
    Fifth Grade (5th) are as follows: Compare the cell theory to the characteristics of a scientific theory. 2. Calculate mode from scientific data using SI units. 3. Identify the transfer of energy using pyramids; terrestrial and aquatic. 4. Identify characteristics of physical change. 5. Calculate range from scientific data using Si units. 6. Calculate median from scientific data using SI units. 7. Examine the role of limiting factors on the carrying capacity of an ecosystem: food, space, water, shelter. 8. Conduct investigations using: inclined planes-ramps. 9. Compare the human body’s mass to weight on Earth, the moon, and other planets in our solar system. 10. Explain the role of observation in the development of a theory.
Goal Students will improve math performance in all areas.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored a 59.09. We are a Needs Improvement school in Math. We will continue to strive to show growth in 2014-2015 school year, in order to make AMO of 83.12.
Intervention: Strategies to enhance math instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: A Job-Embedded Professional Development: What It Is, Who is Responsible, and How to Get It Done Well, published by Andrew Croft, Jane G Coggshall, ph.D., Megan Dolan, Ed. D., Elizabeth Powers, Joellen Killion in 2010.
Michelle Larocque, Ira Kleiman, and Sharon M. Darling. (2011) "Parental Involvement: The Missing Link in School Achievement". 55(3), 115-122.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
11 ipads and 1 mac computer will be purchased to run the ipad mobile card. The mobile cart will help enhance instruction within the classroom. The mobile cart will hold 30 ipads and students will have one to one with the devices.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Jacinda Prince Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Materials & Supplies: $5,334.00

ACTION BUDGET: $5,334.00
Total Budget: $5,334.00

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects -- $0
There is no data for the Source of Funds "NSLA (State-281) - Other Objects".

Source of Funds: NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services -- $5253
Priority 1: Literacy
Supporting Data:
  1. The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    2014
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 76% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 8% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 19% BELOW BASIC, 10% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 38% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 18% Below Basic, 18% Basic, 18% Proficient, 45% Advanced, Female 14% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 36% Proficient, 50% Advanced, African American 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 33% Proficient, 33% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 6% Basic, 29% Proficient, 48% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 50% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 50% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 13% Below Basic, 9% Basic, 26% Proficient, 52% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 68% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 16% scored BASIC, and 16% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 18% BELOW BASIC, 18% BASIC, 24% PROFICIENT, and 41% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 50% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 20% Below Basic, 10% Basic, 40% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Female 11% Below Basic, 22% Basic, 11% Proficient, 56% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 0% Proficient, 67% Advanced, Caucasian 14% Below Basic, 14% Basic, 36% Proficient, 36% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 75% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 33% Proficient, 53% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 26% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: All areas were above 50%. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: We fill as if we will work to improve all areas. We need to always strive to improve every area. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading literary passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation and usage /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    5th GRADE. Overall, 75% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 21% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 21% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 42% PROFICIENT, and 33% ADVANCED. Male 4% Below Basic, 31% Basic, 50% Proficient, 15% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 15% Basic, 53% Proficient, 29% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 25% Basic, 75% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 0% Below Basic, 26% Basic, 45% Proficient, 30% Advanced, Hispanic 33% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 8% Below Basic, 54% Basic, 38% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 2% Below Basic, 13% Basic, 55% Proficient, 30% Advanced. LEP Students, 20% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 80% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing- multiple choice. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Literary Passage, Content Passage, writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation /Reading-practical passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2014 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    6th GRADE Overall, 65% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT,31% scored BASIC, and 4% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 5% BELOW BASIC, 37% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 15% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 15% BASIC, 54% PROFICIENT, and 31% ADVANCED. Male 5% Below Basic, 43% Basic, 43% Proficient, 10% Advanced, Female 3% Below Basic, 24% Basic, 48% Proficient, 24% Advanced, African American 0% Below Basic, 33% Basic, 67% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Caucasian 5% Below Basic, 27% Basic, 48% Proficient, 20% Advanced, Hispanic 0% Below Basic, 50% Basic, 33% Proficient, 17% Advanced, Students with Disabilities, 20% Below Basic, 80% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced, Non-Disabled Students, 0% Below Basic, 20% Basic, 57% Proficient, 23% Advanced. LEP Students, 0% Below Basic, 0% Basic, 0% Proficient, 0% Advanced. The supporting data of the testing showed 9% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, Practical passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Content and Style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage and Mechanics/Reading-practical and content passage.
    2013
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    3rd GRADE. Overall, 70% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 15% scored BASIC, and 15% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 20% BELOW BASIC, 20% BASIC, 33% PROFICIENT, and 27% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 20% PROFICIENT, and 80% ADVANCED. Male 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 40% ADVANCED, 27% PROFICIENT, 27% BASIC, 13% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content Passage, and writing. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing content, and writing style. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, usage, mechanics, /Reading Literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Practical passages, writing content and writing style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows:
    4th GRADE. Overall, 94% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 7% BASIC, 40% PROFICIENT, and 53% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 84% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American N/A-, Caucasian ADVANACED 56%, 38% PROFICIENT, 6% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 1% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: N/A- STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- practical, literary, content passages. Writing- Content, style, sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on writing M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    5TH GRADE. Overall, 80% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 23% BASIC, 35% PROFICIENT, and 40% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 27% PROFICIENT, and 73% ADVANCED. Male 68% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT African American 67 % ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 33% BASIC, 0 % BELOW BASIC 0%, Caucasian 44% ADVANCED, 35% PROFICIENT, 19% BASIC, 2% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, Content passage, and Practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- sentence formation, content, style, mechanics, usage. and reading- literary passage, content passage, and practical passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2013 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows:
    6TH GRADE Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 22% scored BASIC, and 3% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 4% BELOW BASIC, 24% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 24% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 48% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Male 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 87% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANCED, 58% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 8% BELOW BASIC, Caucasian 38% ADVANCED, 45% PROFICIENT, 15% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 7% DECREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary passage, content passage, practical passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- literary, content, and practical passage. Writing- content, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing in M/C.

    2012
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 63% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 31% scored BASIC, and 6% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 33% BASIC, 8% PROFICIENT, and 50% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 25% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 75% ADVANCED. Male 60% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 57% ADVANCED, 0% PROFICIENT, 36% BASIC, 7% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 11% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading content passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading content passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in literacy is as follows: 4th GRADE. Overall, 95% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 0% scored BASIC, and 5% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 8% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 38% PROFICIENT, and 54% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 0% PROFICIENT, and 100% ADVANCED. Male 73% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 63% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED, Caucasian 68%, 26% PROFICIENT, 0% BASIC, 5% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 8% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage, and content passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading Practical Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Content Passage and Writing sentence formation. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Reading practical passage and writing.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall, 88% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 11% scored BASIC, and 2% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 2% BELOW BASIC, 13% BASIC, 34% PROFICIENT, and 51% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 30% PROFICIENT, and 70% ADVANCED. Male 43% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 67% ADVANCED African American 36%, PROFICIENT, 36%, BASIC, 27% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 63% ADVANCED, 30% PROFICIENT, 5% BASIC, 3% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 10% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Content Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing sentence formation, and reading literary passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically Content passage in M/C.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2012 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE Overall, 81% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT, 19% scored BASIC, and 0% BELOW BASIC. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 22% BASIC, 49% PROFICIENT, and 29% ADVANCED. Non-economically disadvantaged 0% BELOW BASIC, 0% BASIC, 44% PROFICIENT, and 56% ADVANCED. Male 41% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 24% ADVANCED African American 50% ADVANCED, 25% PROFICIENT, BASIC, 25% , BELOW BASIC 0%, ADVANACED, Caucasian 36% ADVANCED, 48% PROFICIENT, 17% BASIC, 0% BELOW BASIC. The supporting data of the testing showed 22% INCREASE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing, and Literary Passage. STRENGTH IN OPEN RESPONSE: Writing style and reading content passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically writing and literary passage in M/C.
    2011
    The following is the three year trend for the ACSIP Literacy Priority:
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 3rd GRADE. Overall, 74% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 71 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 71% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 91% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 0% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed 6% DECLINE in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Literary Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading-Practical Passages. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage and Content Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading-Content and Style, and Practical Passages. For the upcoming school year we will focus specifically on Reading- Practical Passage and Content and Style.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 4TH GRADE. Overall, 91% scored ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 84 %, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 100% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 85% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 86% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a 6% GAIN in performance. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Writing, and Partial Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Writing- Usage, Mechanics, and Sentence Formation, and Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Practical Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on multiple choice questions, focusing specifically on Reading-Literary Passage and Content Passage. In open Response we will work specifically on Reading- Content Passage, Reading Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 5TH GRADE. Overall,77% scored ADVANCED / PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 72%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 76% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 77% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 100% ADVNACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 79% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 50% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a 9% GAIN. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICE: Reading- Practical Passage and Writing. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Sentence Formation, Content, and Style. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Literary Passage and Writing-Mechanics, and Usage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Writing, Literary Passage, and Practical Passage.
    According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school the Benchmark data in Literacy is as follows: 6TH GRADE. Overall, 60% scored ADVANCED /PROFICIENT. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 56%, Non-economically disadvantaged 100%, Male 47% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Female 78% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, African American 17% ADVANACED/PROFICIENT, Caucasian 61% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT, Hispanic 80% ADVANCED/PROFICIENT. The supporting data of the testing showed a performance history of a performance history of a 10% DECLINE. Strengths in MULTIPLE CHOICE items were as follows: Reading-Practical Passage. Weakness in MULTIPLE CHOICES: Reading Literary Passage. Strengths in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Literary Passage. Weakness in OPEN RESPONSE: Reading- Content Passage. For the upcoming school year we will focus on Content Passage and Literary Passage.
  2. 2014
    2013-2014 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 13 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Spelling was 77% with 10/13 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 54% with 7/13 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 38% with 5/13 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 18 students tested. Comprehension was 67% scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 39% with scoring proficient. Spelling was 39% with scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 61% with scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 56% with scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 54%, math concepts 38% and math problems 54%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension and math problems. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts and math problems in 2014-2015. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, and math concepts, in 2014-2015.
    2013
    2012-2013 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 20 students tested. Comprehension was 60% with 12/20 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 30% with 6/20 scoring proficient. Spelling was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Problems was 65% with 13/20 scoring proficient. Math- Concepts was 55% with 11/20 scoring proficient. SECOND GRADE: There were 23 students tested. Comprehension was 61% with 14/23 scoring proficient. Vocabulary was 35% with 8/23 scoring proficient. Spelling was 43% with 10/23 scoring procficient. Math- Problems was 43% with 10/23 scoring proficient. Math-Concepts was 52% with 12/23 scoring proficient. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 30%, math concepts 55%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling and math- problems. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: Vocabulary, Spelling, Math- problems, and Math- concepts. SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: comprehension. First grade will work to improve their vocabulary and math concepts in 2013-2014. Second grade will work to improve their vocabulary, spelling, math concepts, and math problems in 2013-2014.
    2012
    2011-2012 ITBS scores are as follows: KINDERGARTEN- none. FIRST GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 43%, Language was 55% and Math 54%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 11.1% advanced, 44.4% proficient, 33.3% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The male population was 11.1% advanced, 55.6% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 11.1% below basic. The total combined with 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% below, and 11.1% below basic. SECOND GRADE: There were 19 students tested. Reading was 67%; Language was 69% and Math 62%. There were 10 females and 9 males tested in first grade. The female population was 30% advanced, 30% proficient, 30% basic, and 10% below basic. The male population was 44.4% advanced, 11.1% proficient, 22.2% basic, and 22.2% below basic. The total combined with 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% below, and 15.8% below basic. Sub Pops- FIRST GRADE: black 100% proficient, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 12.5% advanced, 43.8% proficient, 31.3% basic, and 12.5% below basic. Total Ethnicity 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. Sub Pops- SECOND GRADE: black 50% proficient and 50% basic, Multi Ethnic 100% proficient, White 43.8% advanced 12.5% proficient, 25% basic, and 18.8% below basic. Total Ethnicity 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 14 students, 46.2% Proficient, 38.5% basic, 15.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 40% advanced 60% proficient, and 27.8% basic. Total- 11.1% advanced, 50% proficient, 27.8% basic, and 11.1% below basic. ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-SECOND GRADE: 14 students, 28.6% advanced, 28.6% proficient, 21.4% basic, and 21.4% below basic. NON-ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED-FIRST GRADE: 5 students, 60% advanced and 40% basic. Total- 36.8% advanced, 21.1% proficient, 26.3% basic, and 15.8% below basic. ITBS FIRST GRADE WEAKNESSES: vocabulary 33%, math concepts 51%, and math problems 53%. FIRST GRADE STRENGTHS: Reading comprehension and spelling. ITBS SECOND GRADE WEAKNESSES: NONE- SECOND GRADE STRENGTHS: Vocabulary, comprehension, spelling, math concepts, and math problems.
    2011
    Kindergarten: According to the trend analysis for the 2011 school year the ITBS data in Literacy is as follows: Overall, 73.7 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American N/A, Caucasian 91.4%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    First Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored 76.5 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 75.0%, Non-economically disadvantaged, African American 100%, Caucasian 73.3%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    Second Grade: In 2011 the ITBS scores indicated that the combined population scored. Overall, 38.9 %. Analyzing the sub-populations, they scored as follows: Economically disadvantaged 50%, African American N/A, Caucasian 37.5%, Students with Disabilities 0%.
    The district item analysis shows the following areas of strengths and weaknesses. Kindergarten weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary, Verb Tense, Classification, Prepositions:Relationships. First grade weaknesses are as follows: Relationships. 2nd Grade Weaknesses are as follows: Vocabulary. Strengths for Kindergarten are as follows: Picture Clues, and Word Attach. Strengths for 1st grade are as follows: Vocabulary, Sentence Comprehension, Story Comprehension, Vowels, Consonants, Spelling in Context, Capitalization in Context, Punctuation in context. The strengths for 2nd grade are as follows: Vowels, Consonants, and Spelling in Context.
  3. 2014-2015
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 15 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 63% were low risk, % some risk, and 31% were at risk in FSF. Kindergarten had 100% in LNF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in PSF. In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 95% low risks, 5% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (CLS). In 1st grade, 20 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 68% low risks, 32% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 1st grade LNF was 100%. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 69% low risk, 23% some risk, 8% at risk in NWF (CLS). %. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in NWF (WWR). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 70% low risk, 15% some risk, 15% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 15% some risk, 8% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 13 students were tested, 77% low risk, 23% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 63% low risk, 26% some risk, 11% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 5% some risk, 16% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 79% low risk, 16% some risk, 5% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 3rd grade 19 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 78% low risk, 11% some risk, 11% at risk in DAZE. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 41% low risk, 17% some risk, 42% at risk in DORF (Fluency). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 67% low risk, 8% some risk, 25% at risk in DORF (Accuracy). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 92% low risk, 8% some risk, 0% at risk in DORF (Retell). In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 24 students were tested, 75% low risk, 21% some risk, 4% at risk in DAZE. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2013-2014
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 20 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 65% were low risk, 15% some risk, and 20% were at risk. In 1st grade, 11 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 82% low risks, 9% some risk, 9% at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 74% low risk, 5% some risk, 21% at risk. In 3rd grade 23 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 87% low risk, 0% some risk, 13% at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 80% low risk, 7% some risk, 13% at risk. We will strive to maintain the low risk students, working intensively with the some and at risk students to help them improve their status.
    2012-2013 DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  4. TLI 2013-2014
    The TLI Data from 2013-2014 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2014-2015 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade (1st)-No TLI data. Second Grade(2nd) are as follows: 1. Describe how reasons supports specific points of the author makes in the text. 2. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting or plot. 3. Ask and answer questions as who, what, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 4. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing of speaking. 5. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. 6. Capitalize dates, and names of people. 7. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. 8. Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series. 9. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. 10. Ask and answer questions to help understand key details in the text. Third Grade (3rd) are as follows: 1. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 3. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 4. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such a chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. 5. Describe characters in story and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. 6. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 7. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. 8. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. 9. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. 10. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author in the text. Fourth Grade (4th) are as follows: 1. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose and refer to the structural elements of a poem when writing or speaking about a text. 2. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 3. Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 4. Explain events, procedure, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (Analysis) 5. Explain events, procedures, idea, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text (Sequencing). 6. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain specific words of phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area. 7. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in a context. 8. Refer to details and examples in a text when explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 9. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meaning (simile). 10. Produce simple, compounds and complex sentences (Simple sentences). Fifth Grade (5th)are as follows: 1. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. 2. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Article Details). 3. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes (Vocabulary). 5. Explain relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Inference). 6. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text (Inference). 7. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text (Summary). 8. Explain how series of chapters, scenes or stanza fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama or poem. 9. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. 10. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in a text (Sequencing). Sixth Grade(6th) are as follows: 1. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution (Literary Element Analysis). 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal options or judgments (Central Idea). 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. maintain consistency in style and tone. 4. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaking in a text. 5. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. d. recognize and correct vague pronouns. 6. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene o stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (Text Features). 7. Choose words and phrases to covey ideas precisely. 8. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons. 9. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (Analysis). 10. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e. recognize variations from Standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identifying and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

    2012-2013
    The TLI Data from 2012-2013 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2013-2014 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Ask and answer questions (inference),Literary Element Analysis, Vocabulary, Analysis, Acknowledge different points of views of characters, Literary Element Analysis, Article Details, Determine the meaning of words from 2nd grade topics or subject areas, Identify the main purpose, and Author’s purpose. Third Grade- Ask and answer questions (inference), Sequencing, Literacy Element Analysis, Analysis, Text Features, Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text, Describe the logical connections between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text, form and use regular and irregular plural nouns, Use abstract nouns, Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement, Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, use commas in addresses, use commas and quotation marks in dialogue, use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening, Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. Fourth Grade- Article details, Inference, summary, Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements in poems, compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first and third-person narrations, Article details, Main idea, Analysis, inference, sequencing, Determine the meeting of general academic and domain specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area, Use relative pronouns, relative adverbs, simile, metaphor, Idiom, adage/proverb, adjectives, subject-verb, pronoun-antecedent, simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence. Fifth Grade- Article details, Inference, Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text, vocabulary, literary devices, explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem, article details, summary, sequencing, conjunctions, use correlative conjunctions, use punctuation to separate items in a series, use a comma to set off the words yes and no (mild interjections), nouns of direct address, adjectives, fragments, run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words. Sixth Grade- Article details, inference, central idea, literary element analysis, text features, explain how an author develops a the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text, inference, analysis, determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative and technical meanings, text features, ensure the pronouns are in the proper case, use intensive pronouns, recognize and correct vague pronouns, recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language, maintain consistency in style and tone, produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting, inappropriate fragments and run-ons, correctly use frequency confused words, choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely, recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, use punctuation to separate items
    2011-2012
    The TLI Data from 2011-2012 in Literacy showed the following areas of weakness. In 2012-2013 we will strive in making a gain in these areas. Kindergarten- No TLI data. First grade-No TLI data. Second Grade-Use context clues to make sense of new words. Use knowledge of personal pronouns, simple abbreviations, antonyms, synonyms, and root words to read with meaning. Locate information within a fictional text. Identify the main idea. Use fictional text to sequence events in logical order. Analyze different common genres of literature such as poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Determine the author’s purpose. Ask questions and support answers by connecting prior knowledge. Determine the main idea in nonfiction text. Distinguish between fact and opinion. Use nonfiction text to sequence events in logical order. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas. Create a well-developed paragraph that includes introduction, details, and conclusion. Include relevant information in writing. Use transition words. Revise writing for content based on teacher conferences. Delete irrelevant information. Use a variety of sentences that include a subject and verb and make sense. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use and correctly punctuate declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. Capitalize proper nouns. Use apostrophes for contractions. Third Grade- Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing a literary text. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Determine the main idea. Analyze poetry. Distinguish between facts and opinions. Understand and use reference materials such as dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and online resources. Determine the purpose for reading and the author’s purpose for writing in nonfiction text. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Use text features to find information and support understanding. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Write for different purposes and audiences. Create a strong introduction and conclusion. Use transition words. Delete irrelevant information. Edit and proofread for mechanics, punctuation, usage, and completeness. Use a variety of simple and compound sentences. Eliminate fragments. Use subject verb agreement in sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Use the pronouns “I” and “me” correctly in sentences. Use singular and plural pronouns correctly. Use past and present verb tense. Spell commonly used homophones correctly in context. Use commons in a series and in the greeting and closing of a letter. Use punctuate correctly. Use a comma before a conjunction in a compound sentence. Fourth Grade- Identify and explain synonyms, antonyms, and homographs. Analyze poetry. Determine the main idea. Summarize fiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Make inferences based on prior knowledge and the text. Use graphic organizers. Use text features to find information and support. Summarize nonfiction text. Use nonfiction text toe sequence events in a logical order. Create a strong introduction. Delete irrelevant information. Use complex sentences correctly. Use transitional words and phrases. Use complex sentences. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-ons. Employ standard English. Maintain appropriate tense throughout the text. Eliminate double negatives. Use the articles a, an, and the correctly. Apply conventional rules of capitalization in writing. Use an apostrophe with plural possessives. Use commas in a series. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence. Use a comma before a conjunction and a compound sentence. Fifth Grade- Use context clues to determine correct dictionary meaning of multiple meaning words. Identify and explain figurative language. Analyze different common genres of literature. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of literary text. Determine the main ideas and theme in fiction text. Identify cause/effect, compare/contrast and problem/solution relationship in nonfiction texts. Distinguish between facts and opinions in a text in order to evaluate the credibility of an argument or explanation. Determine the main idea. Determine the author’s purpose in a piece of informational text. Use a variety of informational text to find information and support understanding. Interpret information found in maps, charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams. Summarize nonfiction text identifying main idea and supporting details. Scan materials to locate specific information. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help generate and organize ideas and information. Determine the purpose and audience for a piece of writing. Create a strong lead and conclusion. Use transitional words and phrases to convey a logical thought process. Revise drafts for coherence style, content and sentence formation and logical support of ides based on peer responses and teacher conferences. Use a variety of simple, compound and complex sentences of varied lengths. Define and identify the parts of speech to construct effective sentences. Use possessive pronouns correctly. Spell homonyms correctly according to usage. Apply conventional rules of capitalizations of grammar with emphasis on end marks, questions marks, apostrophes. Use commas to set off a person’s name in a sentence, when appropriate. Use commas in a series. Use a comma with a introductory dependent clause. Use quotations marks and commas with dialogue. Identify and understand the use of prepositional phrases. Sixth Grade- Identify common Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts, and their connection to new vocabulary specialized or otherwise. Identify and explain the effects of significant literary devices. Identify and analyze elements and forms of a variety of narrative and lyric poetry. Determine the author’s purpose. Compare/contract information and ideas in text. Make inferences and generalizations about information and ideas in text. Locate and interpret specific details in text. Engage in appropriate prewriting strategies to help organize ideas and information. Create an organizational structure appropriate to specific composition’s intended audience and purpose. Organize or understand revision of content using the following criteria: central idea, organization, unity, elaboration and support, clarity. Organize or understand revision of style using the following criteria, sentence variety, tone and voice, word choice. Use commas in a series. Use commas in a direct address. Use a comma to set off a nonrestrictive clause/phase. Quotation marks. Capitalization. Identify prepositional phrases in a sentences. Demonstrate subject-verb agreement with using collective nouns and indefinite pronouns. Verb conjugation/tense. Parts of speech. Fragments/Run-ons. Sentence combination. Transitional words/phrases.
  5. 2013-2014
    After school tutoring was not offered in 2013-2014, therefore, no data was collected for the program.
    AFTER SCHOOL TUTORING DATA 2012-2013
    DIBELS assessments were given to K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, 4th grade students. In Kindergarten 11 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 12 low risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 5 low risks, 11 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 4 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 19 students were tested, 13 low risk, 2 some risk, 4 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 15 low risk, 4 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 14 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 14 low risk, 1 some risk, 3 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 15 students were tested, 8 low risk, 2 some risk, 5 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 1 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
    2011-2012
    In Kindergarten 17 students were tested. At the beginning of the school year, 14 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 1 were at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 12 were low risk, 5 some risk, and 0 at risk. At the end of the year, 15 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. In 1st grade, 18 students were tested at the beginning of the school year, 16 low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. During the middle of the year, 18 students were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, 0 at risk. At the end of the year in first grade, 17 low risk, 1 some risk, 0 at risk. In 2nd grade at the beginning of the year 17 students were tested, 11 low risk, 3 some risk, 2 at risk. During the middle of the year, 17 were tested, 16 were low risk, 2 some risk, and 2 at risk. At the end of the year in second grade, 14 low risk, 2 some risk, 2 at risk. In 3rd grade 16 students were tested at the beginning of the year, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. During the middle of the year, 16 students were tested, 11 low risk, 0 some risk, and 5 at risk. At the end of the year in third grade, 11 low risk, 1 some risk, 4 at risk. In 4th grade at the beginning of the year, 19 students were tested, 16 low risk, 0 some risk, 3 at risk. During the middle of the year 19 were tested, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. At the end of the year in Fourth grade, 16 low risk, 1 some risk, 2 at risk. In conclusion, our DIBELS score increased in every grade by the end of the year. We will strive to keep the scores above the low risk for the upcoming year.
  6. Tyronza Elementary School average daily attendance for the year 2010/2011 was 93%, 2011/2012 was 94.96%, 2012/2013 was 92.1%.
Goal To improve literacy with an emphasis in all literacy domains.
Benchmark Tyronza Elementary scored 72.08 in 2013-2014. We are a needs improvement school in literacy. We will strive to show gain for 2014-2015. We will continue to show progress by striving to meet the prescribed 81.85.
Intervention: Tyronza Elementary will follow the Comprehensive Literacy Model.
Scientific Based Research: Research Matters/ How Students Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction. Published by Nancy Safer and Steve Fleichman in Educational Leadership, Volume 62, number 5, Feburary 2005.
The Role of Interim Assessments in a Comprehensive Assessment System: A Policy Brief (2007) The Aspen Institute
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
A Literacy Coach will be employed to facilitate a comprehensive literacy program for grades k-6. The site-based coach will provide leadership and expertise at the local school level to support improvement in teacher instruction. The literacy coach will work intensively with the kindergarten through 6th grade teachers to initiate the components of the Comprehensive Literacy. FTE .8 1120/1591,63000-65000,66000
Action Type: Alignment
Action Type: Collaboration
Action Type: Professional Development
Action Type: Special Education
Dorthy Edwards, Literacy Coach Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • District Staff
  • Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,000.00
Total Budget: $2,000.00
Intervention: Implementing Standards Based Instructional Practices
Scientific Based Research: Standards-based Education: Putting Research into Practice, published by Ravay Snow-Renner and Patricia A. Lauer(2005).
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Tyronza librarian will help implement reading strategies to enhance student achievement. Follett software will provide technical support for library.
Action Type: Technology Inclusion
Carey Smith, media specialist Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Computers
  • Teaching Aids
  • Title Teachers
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $1,000.00

ACTION BUDGET: $1,000.00
Total Budget: $1,000.00
Intervention: Strategies to enhance literacy instruction for all students.
Scientific Based Research: Fuchs, Douglas & Lynn S. (2005)." What is Scientifically- Based Research on Progress Monitoring?" Brooks, D. Christopher. “Space Matters: The impact of Formal Learning Environments’ On student Learning. “ British Journal of Educational Technology 42.5 (2011): 719-726. ERIC. Web. 6 Sept. 2013.
Morris, Betty. (2002). “Overcoming Dyslexia.” Shaywitz, Sally E., ( 1996). “Dyslexia” Scientific American, (1996): November.
Actions Person Responsible Timeline Resources Source of Funds
Teachers will use Test preparation materials and DIBELS assessments.
Action Type: Equity
Action Type: Special Education
Jacinda Prince, Principal Start: 07/01/2014
End: 06/30/2015
  • Administrative Staff
  • Performance Assessments
  • Teachers
  • Teaching Aids
NSLA (State-281) - Purchased Services: $2,253.00

ACTION BUDGET: $2,253.00
Total Budget: $2,253.00